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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Warning: Some bloody pics.

On our way home from a barrel race, Tess tore up her foot in the trailer. I go to unload her and there's blood all over the floor and on her left hind hoof. We call the farrier first, and he says that the part of hoof that was almost completely ripped off probably needed to be trimmed, but that he couldn't do it without sedation. So we call the vet. The vet says that yes, the farrier needs to deal with it. The vet was closed, so I had to drive up to the clinic, meet one of the techs, and pick up the meds. I ended up with dormosedan, bute, and a tetanus shot. By this point I'd already cried a little and was really worried about my girl. Hoof injuries scare me. There's a reason there's a saying "no hoof, no horse".

The farrier came out about an hour after I gave her the meds and he used a hot iron to remove the broken part of the hoof and some sole tissue along the bottom of the injury. An entire chunk of hoof wall was gone, white line and all. You could see the outer lamina. After cleaning it up, the farrier didn't seem worried at all and his directions were to keep it dry. The wound will eventually keratinize and be enough to protect it until the hoof grows back. She could bruise easily there, but overall she should be fairly comfortable. He said that if I put shoes on her I could ride her in a couple weeks. I opted not to do that right now. I was stressed and exhausted and just wanted to go home and sleep. But the good news is that it should heal with no permanent issues.

I have no idea how she did it though. The only thing I can think of is that she caught it on the divider (it's a 4 horse stock trailer with two box stalls, so the divider cuts the trailer in half lengthwise) or kicked something. She's usually an angel in the trailer. Never paces, never freaks out, loads beautifully. I'm going to pad the underside of the divider in case that was it.

She was a trooper through the whole thing. She waited and grazed till I got back from the vet and didn't complain about the meds at all.

Now my only issue is keeping her foot dry. We live in Florida and there's actually a tropical storm in the gulf. No threat to us, but it'll dump tons of rain. She's still not at my place yet, which may be better. Where she is, the stalls are dryer. We're still working out how to keep our stalls from flooding.

Pics are attached below. Anyone ever deal with something like this?
 

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Oh no! Yes, I would have cried! It looks horrible but I think your girl will heal up good in time. So sorry this happened. How is she today?
 

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My old mare did something similar although not quite as bad. She got her hoof stuck in a fence. Her hoof grew in just a little bit different but it didn't bother her and she stayed sound.

I would just keep it dry and as free from bacteria as possible while it's growing back in.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks all. She's fine this morning. She spent the night in a level pasture but I'll have to move her inside for a couple days because of this storm that's coming. I might get some more pics when I go to put meds on it and give her bute this afternoon.
@knightrider I did, but I'm really sore. My trainer let me ride her horse around the pattern after the show was over and...let's just say it's been a long time since I've ridden a quarter horse. Tess's gait is much longer and smoother.
 

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My mare did similar but the other way around (from the top down) on her offside hind getting her foot stuck under a gate 4 years ago. I treated the proud flesh with blue stone but otherwise left her body to do what it needed to, and you can hardly tell now. She needs a shoe on that foot to support the heel when she's in work, but she's got dreadful feet and needs shoes anyway, so it's made very little difference to how I manage her. She is completely sound.

Just thought a success story might help things look less scary :)
 

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I'm wondering about something. About 60 years ago as a kid I had a terrible knee injury (looked about that bad). Luckily Grandad next door was a doctor. I remember his main concern was infection. Every day I would soak my knee in hydrogen peroxide in a dishpan a couple hours.
Of course I would ask your veterinarian but wonder if soaking hoof after washing it out would help? My knee heeled great, just left a scar.

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I stumbled upon these videos a couple of days ago, in my "suggested" videos in YouTube...I never watch trimming videos but went down the rabbit hole watching this guy trim and shoe horses. This specific pony had keratoma surgery, and has the majority of the front wall of his hoof gone.

"A keratoma is a rare benign tumor of the inner layer of keratin-producing epidermal hoof wall cells that forms inside a horse's foot. As the tumor slowly grows, it expands and separates the hoof wall laminae, causing pain and lameness."



If I remember correctly, Fallon Taylor's stallion tore almost his entire hoof off many years ago now, in 2011 I believe? He recovered to the point of becoming a breeding stallion, but I believe passed away in 2013? There previously was a youtube video documenting his injury and recovery, but it seems to be lost to the internet void.

Here is another post on the forum of a horse that lost a big chunk of hoof as well: https://www.horseforum.com/hoof-care/update-my-horses-healing-hoof-pics-93162/

I'm a big believer in no hoof, no horse, but horses are so resilient against injury - especially with correct care. I will be following along and hope you update us :) this is definitely one of my biggest fears of happening.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
@ClearDonkey Wow, that looks horrible. Glad mine is nowehere near that bad. I was reading a story about a horse who foundered to the point where the coffin bone was actually exposed...the hoof was pretty much dead at that point, but the horse lived and went on to be a lesson pony and foxhunt. So I guess we should give them more credit for being able to heal themselves.
@Fuddyduddy1952 The vet said it's best to keep it dry. The hoof keratin becomes a little weaker when the hoof is wet and we want the exposed area to harden up. I've actually been careful about using peroxide on wounds because while it does kill bacteria, it's a little harsh on tissues and it can cause the wound to take longer to heal. I'd soak it if the ground wasn't already wet all the time, and once it hardens up a little I'll try epsom salts and apple cider vinegar, diluted. It's a disinfectant and it's soothing. Used it for abscesses and other hoof issues before with success. I've actually used that for human ailments too, like soreness with a wound involved.

I had to move her to the stall today because it's raining and will keep raining for a few days. Put some blue-kote and silver dust on it to try and keep it clean. I'll bandage it if she's determined to get dirt all in it. We have a hurricane coming this way and while it's not going to hit us directly, we'll have a ton of rain.

I worry about her being cooped up for that long. I had to put the donkey in the stall next to her for tonight because she was pacing and screaming for the other horses and getting herself worked up. Didn't bother to touch her hay. She also didn't want to eat her beet pulp, and while it DID have bute and red cell in it, she's usually not that picky. This was before I put her in her stall. Maybe I'm worrying too much. I got a couple of pics but didn't think to take them before I put the medicine on, lol. Doesn't look that bad actually.
 

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[MENTION=241234]I've actually been careful about using peroxide on wounds because while it does kill bacteria, it's a little harsh on tissues and it can cause the wound to take longer to heal.
I totally missed this part of the comment, but yep, peroxide is one of the worst things that you can do for a wound that is beyond just a surface wound.

Irrigation with plain, clean water is better than peroxide for wounds, and betadine is a great option as well for some added cleaning power.




Did your farrier give you en estimated timeline of how long it would take that section of hoof to grow back out? Just curious :)
 
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I had something very similar happen to a horse, except he also punctured a secondary artery.

He spent three days and nights at the vet facility.

It’s been so many years ago, that I don’t remember what topicals the vet gave me when I changed the dressing once daily, along with oral antibiotics.

My horse had a good portion of his hoof sliced off. Nobody expected him to live and when he completely healed with nothing more than a verticals ridge-like scar, the vet and the farrier both said I willed the horse to live.

I kept him separated from the other horses for quite a few months, in the small grassy barnyard, during the day, with access to the barn. I put him in his stall at night and kept his shavings pristine until his hoof healed closed.

Keeping your horse’s injury bacteria and fungus free is crucial but it appears your vet wants the wound open to the air, whereas my vet wanted my horse’s wound completely closed to the world.

Also,a big no to peroxide. Use what the vet tells you to use:)

Best wishes on a full recovery:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I'm very much tempted to take her to see another vet because the one I'm using now is getting on my nerves. They told me to do what the farrier said, but when I told them what the farrier said, they changed their mind and they haven't even seen the horse. I mean, I'm all for listening to the vets, but my farrier really knows what he's doing. And it's a hoof issue- which they specifically told me they refer out to farriers.

My farrier said to keep it clean and dry, but so long as she wasn't getting it nasty it probably didn't need to be wrapped. The vet told me "it'll need to be wrapped for a long time- you're looking at a long recovery for her." The farrier told me that if I really needed to use her I could put shoes on her in a couple weeks and be just fine. I probably won't do that since I have no reason to rush her recovery, but still.

This is from a scholarly article written by several vets and farriers at Texas A&M https://aaep.org/sites/default/files/issues/proceedings-10proceedings-z9100110000522.pdf
After the hoof wall is removed, depending on the condition being treated, it is usually indicated to keep the hoof wall bandaged until the exposed tissue is adequately cornified and lameness has resolved.
The farrier said the wound wasn't actually that deep. I mean, it took off the hoof wall, but it could have been way worse. And if the wound closes begins to keratinize (or "cornify" technically), it should keep pathogens out, right? So why exactly does it need to be wrapped for any longer than that? I kind of feel like I'm being treated like an idiot. I've owned horses for a while and seen my share of injuries. Obviously I'm monitoring for infection, proud flesh, lameness, etc. I'll keep the foot bandaged until it hardens up, but the farrier and the vet both said the best thing for the hoof is to be dry. The vet is telling me I have to keep her stalled all the time, which is fine since it's raining, but what about after? She goes nuts in the stall and would probably get her foot more nasty in there then in a clean pasture. There is not heat or swelling in her foot right now, I've been checking that. I'd think moving around promotes circulation and keeps swelling down too.

I hope I'm not being unreasonable. I don't want to be "that" client, and I don't want it to seem like I'm not taking care of my girl. I obviously want the best for my horse. I just have a feeling this vet isn't exactly sure what they're talking about. I've had issues with this vet before. I think the treatment plan that we're on right now is going to do just fine, but if it won't, I'll probably get a second opinion. I know several people who don't like this vet either.

I don't know. This is stressful.
 

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I had something very similar happen to a horse, except he also punctured a secondary artery.



He spent three days and nights at the vet facility.



It’s been so many years ago, that I don’t remember what topicals the vet gave me when I changed the dressing once daily, along with oral antibiotics.



My horse had a good portion of his hoof sliced off. Nobody expected him to live and when he completely healed with nothing more than a verticals ridge-like scar, the vet and the farrier both said I willed the horse to live.



I kept him separated from the other horses for quite a few months, in the small grassy barnyard, during the day, with access to the barn. I put him in his stall at night and kept his shavings pristine until his hoof healed closed.



Keeping your horse’s injury bacteria and fungus free is crucial but it appears your vet wants the wound open to the air, whereas my vet wanted my horse’s wound completely closed to the world.



Also,a big no to peroxide. Use what the vet tells you to use:)



Best wishes on a full recovery:)
I agree on no peroxide, I was just making an analogy. I'm thinking whatever it takes to keep infection out the better. Maybe another vet's second opinion would be good. I'm so sorry it happened and hope for the best.

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I can “hear” the stress in your voice - I am sorry you are the rope in a tug of war between the vet and the farrier.

I will have to dig and dig really deep (maybe the attic:( but I will try to find the invoices on my horse. His accident was in 2004 and I lost him in 2006 when he slipped in the pasture play-fighting with another gelding and shattered his front leg.

The hoof injury was a back hoof. I will tell you what I remember.

My vet at that time was a very savvy all animal vet whose wife had Holsteiners (horses) and he had a breeding program with Limousin cattle. Meaning he had enough large animal experiences of his own, plus he was exceptionally smart.

He was adamant about keeping the wound medicated and covered until the hoof started to grow back.

He was happy about me keeping the horse alone in the grassy barnyard (with access to the barn), then in his stall at night with clean shavings.

Even though he said once daily was ok to change the bandage, I changed it 2X/day and kept the bandage secure with duct tape.

At some point after the covering was no longer needed, the vet sent me home with a mix of DMSO & wintergreen to put on the ankle above the wound. The wound was no longer raw but the hoof wall had not yet grown down.

The vet was adamant that I wear gloves and be careful not to get the stuff on my skin. I THINK I was to put that on the puffy ankle once daily but it could have been twice daily.

Sultan healed with only that vertical ridge I mentioned above. No puffiness in the ankle, never a lame step.

I also know that whatever Topical I used on the wound was NOT purple, like what you are using.

Sultan’s accident was also 16 years ago, so ideas regarding wrap or don’t wrap, plus meds may have changed by now.

Sultan had spent 3 days and 3 nights at the clinic due to the punctured secondary artery - he had lost a LOT of blood. So I know he had antibiotics at the clinic, plus tetanus and they sent me home with pills but I can’t remember what.

I honestly don’t remember giving him bute but I’m pretty sure they drugged him up pretty good at the clinic. By the time 72 hours passed and they let him come home, he still wasn’t feeling any
pain:)

If you have another vet option, yes I sure would get a second opinion on a wound that serious )
 

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Edit time lapsed, so I had to make a new post.

EDITED TO ADD ORAL MEDS

TUCOPRIM - and Sultan stayed on TUCOPRIM for two tubs worth.
.

I still can’t remember, nor is it on the bill, what I used for a topical directly on the wound. There’s nothing on the bill so maybe I didn’t use anything- just kept it well covered, until he sold me the DMSO/wintergreen to take the puffiness out of the ankle, which it did.
 
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I ended up bandaging it. I sprayed it off (it wasn't bandaged before) and she didn't react to the water on the wound, so I don't think it bothered her. There's no oozing or nasty smell or anything coming from the wound either, all good signs. She had a little bit of warmth and puffyness around the pastern on all four legs- most likely from being in the stall. All hooves feel to be the same temperature as well. They're going to be warmer in a stall with heavy bedding than out in the damp grass. I let her out to graze and roll while cleaning her stall and I didn't notice any lameness (at a walk anyhow). She's eating her feed too so she's getting the bute in that. I don't like that there's a little heat present. It's most likely from stalling, and there's no difference in temp in her hurt leg vs her other legs. If she was out in the pasture walking around, she wouldn't be puffy.
@walkinthewalk DMSO? they have that at tractor supply. Yeah, you're not supposed to get it on you. You exhale the byproduct if you get it on your skin. Won't kill you, but people say it smells like bad onions. :shrug: I wonder if the wintergreen was in there to add an "icy hot" kind of effect. Like menthol would. I took a sponge and applied a little liniment to her leg where it was puffy because that's what I had, but I may try the DMSO if she starts to swell up.

This hurricane has turned towards us and might get nasty, so we'll see how they weather it out. I'd give a lot right now for it to be dry outside so she could be out in a small, clean paddock, but that's not going to happen anytime soon. I've got friends asking for help boarding up their barns. I'd go help, but they're across the bay from us and they shut down the bridges in big storms.

It's hard to see the extent of anything because the blu-kote stains the hoof so much, but here's her hoof this evening.
 

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It looks really good - you’re doing a great job:)

Yowza, that is exactly where Sultan sliced off part of his hoof AND his heel bulb. You are very fortunate the secondary artery wasn’t cut.

I’ve been watching Sally on the Weather Channel. Prayers and good thoughts coming your way and to all of your friends. This is a horribly active hurricane season:(

Our weather folks are saying we should only see the farthest outer band on the left side of the storm. It’s supposed to bring us drier air and probably little-to-no rain.

If you ever want to move, look at Middle Tennessee, lollol. We see our fair share of tornadoes but plant yourself in a bowl on a hill and most of the high winds either go over you, or follow the the high ridges surrounding the bowl. In Middle and East Tennessee everyone can live on a hill, if they want to; we sit at ~1000 feet, while our county seat sits at 755’. When the heavy rains come, I stay on this hill, lol


C.O.L.A. is fair to us retired folks. Our biggest employers are the medical profession, the Nissan plant, and Amazon - I think Amazon is trying to take over the world.

****
Anyway, keep doing what you’re doing with the hoof. Make sure the farrier stays current keeping it trimmed, so it will “learn” to grow back correctly:)
 
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Weather was terrible so I didn't get to see her tonight. Family can change the diaper bandage and give her bute. No pics but she's eating all her feed and not being as nervous in the stall.

Middle Tennessee sounds lovely. Heck, even north Alabama is pretty nice. Hills? We have no idea what those are down here lol.
 

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Oh ick. So sorry. Horses always find a way to hurt themselves.



I've never had an injury like that before but horses are resilient and I think it looks very good.


Many years ago, my old horse Beau practically cut off his left front foot in the barbed wire fence. It's a miracle he didn't bleed out and die in the pasture (started gushing blood when the vet went to stitch up what he could). He cut it around the outside and down around the back. So when he pick up his foot, the leg went first and then the "hoof followed". I thought for sure my 5-year-old horse was going to be a pasture pet the rest of his life. It took over a year to heal, and looked terrible from all the scar tissue, but that danged foot never bothered him a day after that. Even stayed barefoot just fine and returned to barrel racing no problem. In the end, it was a totally separate issue that forced me to retire him.



And Red has cut his back leg(s) on three different occasions. Two of those to the BONE. Doesn't bother him any.



Shotgun tried to impale his hindquarter on a fence post. Doesn't bother him any.



Had a mare that got her back leg in the barbed wire fence. That caused more damage to the hock and she didn't bear any weight on it for months (but she got around on 3 legs just fine, let me tell you). She was never quite right on that leg after that, but went to a great home at the ripe age of 18 to be loved on by a family with 5 kids.



Dexter gave himself a hock infection after a puncture injury last year. I've hopped on him briefly a few times this year to test him out. Seems okay. We'll try to leg him back up next year and see what happens.



Oh all the injuries !!!!!!!


you are not the only one, OP, but it still stinks.



Cheers to a speedy recovery for your horse.
 
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