The Horse Forum banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
175 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was wondering how I can get ALL of the caked mud out of my horses hoof and look for abnormalities easier. I also had a question, I was picking out her hooves earlier today and they smelled bad. I know they aren't going to smell good :lol:, but its a funky smell. Thanks!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
24,134 Posts
Probably thrush if they smell bad. A sharp hoof pick & a wire brush should clean them well, but yeah, caked clay & stones can get wedged pretty deep if there's any separation. If you would like a hoof critique, see the link in my signature for what pics required.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
175 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks! And to treat thrush, what would you guys recommend?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
160 Posts
Sugardine works well for severe thrush. It's a splash of gentle iodine mixed with enough table sugar to make it the consistency of peanut butter. You can wrap the foot, and change every day until the thrush is gone. This stays in the hoof better than the liquid feed store products.

I've also heard of people using neosporin mixed with athlete's foot cream - I've never tried it myself though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
It's thrush by the sounds of it. Try Copertox, it has worked really well on my ponies. MAke sure you clean the hoof proper first and try to get some of the thrush out before you apply anything if you want it to work. The problem is with most people is we do not clean the hoof proper and thrushbuster or Copertox or anything else you use will not work. Next time your black smith is out have him help you clean hoof proper and then apply. Good luck!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,323 Posts
Thrush can be pretty hard to get under control sometimes- IME some remedies work for some cases and not for others- even for the same horse- because thrush is a fairly general term for an infection that can be caused by various different microbes. I've gone through an entire bottle of No Thrush powder (which many people swear by) without seeing any improvement at all. I've had fairly consistent success with Pete's Goo (50/50 mixture of regular human triple antibiotic cream and antifungal cream, applied deep into the crevices with a dental syringe) and Thrushbuster.

You might look into White Lightning to get it under control to start with, and then use another product regularly to keep it from coming back.

As for getting out caked mud/rocks/etc, I love my Ultimate Hoof Pick.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Meadow and loosie

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,712 Posts
Everything loosie said.
While nothing compares with a hands-on examination, pictures are sort of required for trying to assess something online.

You can never overstate the value of a good wire brush. Too many people just rely on the little plastic brushes that come on the back of some of the less expensive picks, but they can't measure up to a wire brush. I like them as gifts for people who like how clean the hoof is after I clean it. Sometimes I have to explain that no, it doesn't harm the frog and actually helps clean up any loose bits. Certainly provides for the best, cleanest view of the foot (short of washing it).

Cleaning it off should help you locate where the thrush is located, but it's not always obvious to the eye. Sometimes you have to use the pick to find where it's hiding inside the frog. Other times is easy to see, like when there's a massive split running down between the bulbs.

Another thing that's good when cleaning and dealing with thrush is a spray bottle with vinegar (I mix about 2 to 1 vinegar with water). After you clean the hoof give the infected and surrounding area a good rinse with the vinegar. Thrush doesn't need oxygen, but it doesn't do well with the acid in vinegar. I always keep a squirt bottle in my bucket along with a couple of bottles of tea tree oil.

Won't go into treating thrush at the moment. Best to get pictures to allow for a more informed opinion.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Meadow

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
24,134 Posts
There are many & varied heavy chemicals - like coppertox for eg that will effectively nuke any infection. But they can also damage sensitive tissue on the frog, particularly if it's deep central sulcus thrush. Therefore I avoid heavy chems as a rule and would stick to 'gentler' treatment. As Verona said, there are different bugs that respond to different treatments more or less, so milder treatments, like ACV for eg, don't always work though. I do find t-tree oil to be a pretty 'broad spectrum' effective treatment.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
56 Posts
I wouldn't go out and buy a bunch of products, especially if it is just a mild case. Scrape out the dead stinky hoof and clean it up good with a bucket of soap and warm water, then just go out and clean the mud and debris out every day if you can. It happens to many horses in the winter months, I wouldn't freak out unless it does have black leaky goo or something creepy like that.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Meadow
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top