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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hello, I have recently gotten an ottb (haven’t even owned 4 days) who has been off the track for a year. He was sold and then got taken back due to him getting very bad infections in all of his feet and was emaciated, his weight was put back on and his feet were getting treated, his hooves are now quite flat and he seems to be lame in his front right, has anyone had a horse with flatter feed with soreness and does anyone have suggestions to help him be fully sound?

these were his feet in the process of getting fixed, his feet have improved more however I don’t have any updated pictures at the moment
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updated most recent pictures
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Sweet Jesus:eek::eek:

The person(s) who let that happen needs neutered with my ancient and rusty pig denutters.

I am surprised the horse survived.

A therapeutic farrier is highly advisable and also a lameness vet & x-Rays to see what permanent damage may be done to the inside of the hooves.

Looking at your fotos, it is entirely possible there is permanent damage and he may always be lame.

I know these are older fotos and his hooves have improved BUT that is the most horrible damage, on a live horse, I have ever seen. Thus the reason for my thoughts:)
 

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So, the last pic is the most recent? It looks as if he may have 'blown out' his entire sole at the front?? From the massive solar/frog infection. If that's the case, you need to be careful to keep it clean & free from further infection, BUT chemical disinfectants tend to damage live tissue(solar corium in this case) & can retard healing & growing new sole - I've heard it said that horses will NEVER grow new sole once 'penetrated' - that's not true, but I wonder if the diff is in chemicals used - raw manuka honey has been used successfully both on people in hospital & on horse's hooves with great effect - well worth looking into.

And of course, with no/extremely little sole under the corium under the pedal bone, he desperately needs artificial protection of padded hoof boots(or even taped on baby diapers as 'first aid' until you can get some boots).

If you'd like to post a range of current pics, might help you get more detailed responses. See the link in my signature line for what pic angles are needed.
 

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That poor baby :O Have you got any pictures of them recently - like today or yesterday? If you follow loosie's advice above and get some good photos. Do not stress if you are worried about posting more pictures... there are many people here that can help advise you but in order to help best it would be helpful to see EVERY foot from various angles.

1. has this horse been seen by a vet?
2. how are you treating the feet? (cleaning 1 or 2 times daily? What products?)
3. where is the horse living? (stall, what bedding? How often cleaned?)
4. is he on any medication? (antibiotics? pain relief?)

There are just so many questions about worming, weight, nutrition.. so much to help rehabilitate an animal like this that a vet could help with. Sorry to ask - just more info the better!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I can get some updated pictures tomorrow, I have only owned this horse for 3 days I just picked him up Wednesday so right now I have only had my farrier come out to check his feet and she gave him a trim to try to relive pressure. He is currently on pasture that is half dry lot half field and his stall gets cleaned daily. He’s currently not on any medicine or getting any other treatments
 

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Those are some of the sickest hooves I have seen with a very bad trim to top it off. TB's can be extremely sensitive to an unbalanced hoof. Neglected like they were, well the pictures say it all. That horse needs specialized veterinary care and a rehab farrier and pain meds. Anything less than that is continuing to this horse's agony.
 

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FYI I am not seeing the pictures.
 
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FYI I am not seeing the pictures.
They are up in the original post but I can't see them close up because I've got my barn glasses on, lol
 

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Yes, he is beautiful. He bears a strong resemblance to “Dancer’s Image” a Get of Native Dancer who was also known as “The Gray Ghost”.

You can google either one and find pictures.

Again, I say, especially after looking at your horse, it is nothing short of a miracle he has survived.

He is one tough horse with a strong will to survive—- he may very well be in the line of Native Dancer whose onery self was a legend and much loved not only by his groomsman but by the American public in the 1950’s:)
 
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Have you had his feet x rayed? This is how you will know what is going on in that foot. He may require medicated pads and shoes. Have him x rayed. Have your VET and Farrier discuss the options with you .
 

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The hooves are unbalanced, I can see it in the heels, one is further ahead than the other and crammed full of bar. Bars can & will grown inwards and cause pain.
 
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Great to see!! So how long after the apparent penetration(?) to the current(?) pics?

Agree with Wares that I'd be conscientious about keeping the bars well trimmed, so they'll continue to 'relax out' from where they were. BUT with the sole so obviously extremely thin, I'd be extremely cautious of taking too much, or any sole whatsoever.

Balance is of course important, but considering where they've come from & where they are, & that the heels only seem slightly imbalanced(not to mention, we only have those angle pics to go on so can't be accurate from them) I wouldn't be too concerned about that for now.

Feet are quite dished/flared, & sooner the walls can be relieved of ground pressure & start growing down well attached, sooner the soles can start growing thicker, stronger.

Diet & well balanced nutrition is really important & you may already know that his diet as a racehorse was not helpful for his hooves.

I'd be keeping the horse in well padded boots for some time yet.
 

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I suspect distal decent (coffin bone sinking). X-rays would determine for certain. Now that the heels are trimmed back to where they should be, some of the decent may start reversing. Relieving loading on the quarters and toes by sloping 45-60 degrees will increase the chances of reversing decent.

A foot that flat likely also has thin soles which will thicken if/when decent is reversed. Until then, boots with pads or very soft footing will help with comfort. I'd figure on 6 months to a year for significant improvement.

 

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For those who can't see large shots, it may work to right click on photo and then open in separate tab. The first one will turn your stomach!
 
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