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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 29 year old QH that randomly started quidding his hay. His hay is soft and he was just eating it fine. This started about 3 weeks ago which is also when he started to be put on grass..I had the vet come out and check all his teeth none were loose, but she did file a couple sharp edges. We have his teeth floated every year (just done in Nov 2019) . Although thinking back, the vet did not look in his mouth ..she just felt around and went over every tooth. He did not react in any pain to any tooth she messed with. She indicated his front molars are smooth but his back have enough to eat hay. Even though his original hay was pretty soft, I got the really soft 2nd cutting hay that he loves (recently inhaled when he got it)! He is still continuing to quid.. he really wants the hay and eats it half way then spits it out. He is eating grass and hay cubes fine. Any suggestions? Get a equine dentist? request vet to actually look in mouth? what other things could be causing him to quid? Thanks!!
 

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To check a horse's teeth they need to have a gag to hold his mouth open and then the examiner can feel right to the back molars safely.

Older horses loose their teeth as they get into their late twenties/thirties. This is because the teeth just have given all their growth.

Personally I would get an equine dentist out to see what is going on.
 

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WELCOME to the Forum!!


An "abrupt" change in eating to me is more alarming.
I would be searching out a specialist since it is possible the vet missed a issue...
There is no way a full mouth exam can be done unless a dental speculum is put in place.
A horses teeth go a lot further back than most realize...
I would suggest that when you have the specialist out to check your horse you ask to look, to insert your arm and feel those very back teeth...the front teeth are easy, the back teeth are the ones needing a serious look-see.
If your horse is not eating well he also will start dropping weight, so time is of the essence to get those teeth checked out.
Let us know how your horse does, what is found and corrected.
:runninghorse2:...
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank you for the responses. A dental speculum was used for the exam and the vet did stick her hand pretty far back. She went over every tooth to see if was loose or cause him pain when she messed with it. He hasn't lost any teeth yet either. She has been doing his teeth for 20 years. The thing is the vet never visually took a look inside with her eyes. I know with older horses this is something I'm going to face one day, but literally few weeks ago he was eating hay fine. I thought maybe he was full from grass and picky.. But since I gave him some of the best softest hay possible, and hes still quidding.. I am concerned. Could there be other hidden factors that were missed?
 

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Then you need to call the vet back cause something recently happened inside that mouth hidden affecting his ability to eat well.
Something needing done sooner as like already mentioned, if he isn't eating well he will start to drop weight pretty quick..not something anyone wants but especially on a senior citizen.
:runninghorse2:...
 

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It may not have been as abrupt a change as you are thinking. He could have been doing this for a while and you have just now started noticing it. I remember noticing over night that my horse was doing it. Did the vet mention how many teeth he has? If he has lost a bunch of teeth missing in the back then it's possible he just isn't chewing it well enough anymore.

You could definitely have the vet out again to check his teeth - Did the vet mention if he has a ridge mouth and do you remember if she pulled anything out of the sides like if there was food collecting between his teeth and his cheek?

You might try a bag of the shredded hay or give some wetted down pellets. At 29 you may just be at the stage where he is not able to swallow the chewed up hay as well. Horses teeth get softer as they get older because they start wearing down the enamel. The back teeth get shorter because they are not erupting as quickly as they would on a younger horse. There are probably some spots where the teeth are too sharp and some sort of pain is being caused or the teeth may have worn down to the gum line.
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I dont think she counted specifically, we dont know of him losing any teeth, and hes never had issues before. There was a wad of forage from his check, but I had given him some hay cubes right before she came. She did not mention anything about a ridged mouth. What is that? I was also thinking, if those couple Sharp edges she filed down were bugging him, it may take a couple days for him to bounce back. I think chopped hay is a great idea.
 

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I have a 32 year old. Two years ago he started to quid. Took him to an equine dentist. His teeth were all there, but had sharp points that needed floating. The dentist was very clear on this: he was quidding because his teeth were so smooth he couldn't grin the hay anymore. He told me Moro would be able to eat spring and fall grass, but not hay or summer grass. I needed to soak his feed in water. That was two years ago. The equine dentist was 100% on the ball. Moro is doing very well. I'm wondering about the dentist who saw your horse. Did she see him before or after he started quidding? If it was after, what was her explanation?
 

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I'm sorry. I meant wave mouth. I'm thinking the sharp edges are some of it, that would explain the wad of hay in his cheek but my guess is that his teeth are just getting soft and loosing the sharp enamel. a float will help but I would guess you are just looking at soaking hay pellets or alfalfa cubes and maybe going the finely chopped hay route. With my oldest horse I spend the ridiculous money on the compacted hay you can get at tractor supply. The alfalfa just crumbles into dust and just one bale is enough for him in a week. but he is at the point where he has four different feed dishes that I feel and then one with soaked hay pellets. So he wanders around spending his entire day eating at his leisure in his private paddock.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Met vet actually indicated to me he had enough teeth for the hay. She indicated the front molars were smooth like glass but not the back ones. She figured the quidding was the couple Sharp edges she filed down.. Next day, When I said he was still quidding, she said shes guesses she was wrong. I would do hay cubes, but my horse eats them so quick. Id hate for him to go all night no food especially in the winter. Does chopped hay take longer to eat? Do any farm co-ops chop your own hay for you?
 

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I get mine at Tractor Supply but I'm sure you can get them at farm co-ops. I soak my hay cubes. I am afraid to feed them without doing so for fear of choke. I have had 2 instances of it with my oldest horse.

If you are worried about him eating it to fast then you can buy a feeder with bars in it that forces him to slow down or you can put a salt block in his feed bin so he has to eat around it.
 
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