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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I recently bought a horse and he is broke to ride. Very well trained in my opinion. Last Thursday we were going to try to ride him. I let him smell both the saddle and blanket so he would know what they were. However, when I went to put the blanket on his back, he got very nervous and started moving away from me. I didn't want him to run into anything so I untied him and held him by hand. Doing this, he was a little less nervous and I got it close to him. But when I tried to move it closer to his back he spins in circles. If I put the blanket on the higher part of his neck towards his head and slide it down to his back, he is fine. Now the saddle is a different story. I can't lift that saddle with one hand and put it on his back. So it's difficult to leave him tied and also saddle him. My boyfriend helps me but then Cheyenne (my horse) gets even more nervous. Once the saddle is on him, he's fine. But then comes the tightening part. Once you start to tighten the cinch and stuff, he starts to spin again. I'm not sure how I should go about helping him get over his fear of saddles and blankets. Help....anyone?
 

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No disrespect but you don't sound too experienced with horses that have a problem. My best suggestion is that you find either a trainer or a very experienced horse person that would be willing to come help you. I could tell you how I would do it but my method runs a very real possiblity of you getting hurt if you don't know what you're doing.
 

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wether your experienced or un experienced doesnt really matter in a situation like this...getting a trainer for a problem like this wouldnt help you out very much considering this sounds like s HUGE trust problem. All i can tell you is patience...you can either keep his cross tied or hold the lead your self....if you keep his cross tied go about one thing at a time...get your blanket and rub it all over him..wether he moves or not, just keep doing it (while being safe of course)....once he stops moving..which eventually he will, put it on his back, take it off, put it on, take it off, put it on...repeat the process until hes completely ok with it...next, the saddle...same thing....while hes cross tied...put it on, take it off, put it on, take it off....again, until hes ok with it...the cinch...when the saddles on, cinch it tight but dont tie it or buckle it...than un cinch it and cinch it, keep doing it until hes ok with it...eventually hell be ok doing it on the cross ties....now....doing it while YOUR holding the lead is different...same process but hold the lead close, keep his head pulled toward you so he can see you..if he moves in cirles, circle with him until he stops..this can get tiring but it'll pay off....it all the just patience and repitition....if i were you, id spend more time on the ground with him working on his trust with you...if he cant trust you on the ground, he wont trust you on his back...and that will lead to bad things! =)

hope that helps!!!
 

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Did you ever consider clicker training? It helped me a lot with one of my horses when he had a serious issue with lifting his feet. He just would not allow me work on his feet. He was just out of shoes and very sensitive. After a week working with the clicker the problem was solved. It also builds great trust and is a very positive way to work with a horse. Good luck with your new horse.
 

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maderiaismine05 has good advice...getting the horse desensitized to it all by continuously putting the tack on and off its back. Work on trust, but what sounds like the biggest thing here is respect. If your horse is well trained and broke, then he is spinning and moving away because he either knows he can get away with not having the saddle put on or he's just testing you. For the LONGEST time my horse did this, and I was alone with no horsey hands around to help me, and I wondered how other peoples' horses would stand ground tied as they were saddled (as the trainer we bought her from did).

What totally solved my problem was: when she moves away, immediately back her up, then stop her and resume trying to put the saddle on. And repeat this as many times as she moves. Eventually she learns that it's a lot of unnecessary work moving away from the saddle when she could just be standing quietly. "Make the right thing easy and the wrong thing hard." This has worked for countless little problems I've had. If your horse isn't actually afraid of the saddle, try this.
 

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one of my past horses had this problem. i worked alot with her on a lunge line, im not sure if your horse lunges or not. but what i did was lunge as normal, then every now and then bring her into me and slowely touch her with the crop around her legs to start, then move upward....this worked very well for me. finally allowing me to get her into the barn to groom and she became very trusting after that when it came to saddling, etc.. this may not work for you, just a suggestion!
 

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wether your experienced or un experienced doesnt really matter in a situation like this...getting a trainer for a problem like this wouldnt help you out very much considering this sounds like s HUGE trust problem.
I respectfully disagree; I think getting a trainer to help you learn how to handle this problem is going to be a huge benefit for both yourself and your horse. A trainer will help you learn when to give and take pressure away and how to control the 4 corners of the horse. They will also coach you on how to earn a horse's respect and trust.
 

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Did you ever consider clicker training?
.

Why does everything have to get complicated?? Why gimics??

Just tie the horse up and throw the blanket off and on, off and on until the horse is ok with it.

I guess first you have to learn how to tie a horse properly.
 

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I respectfully disagree; I think getting a trainer to help you learn how to handle this problem is going to be a huge benefit for both yourself and your horse. A trainer will help you learn when to give and take pressure away and how to control the 4 corners of the horse. They will also coach you on how to earn a horse's respect and trust.
Im not by any means saying that a trainer cant be rewarding...im just saying that in a situation like this it better to try to do things your self the way you want to...for example...she calls a trainer out there for something like this, pays them money to get the horse to do what the trainer wants, than when the trainer leaves, what does she do? so the horse has earned respect for the trainer, but not the rider?..granted the trainer might show her what to do but that just seems like a waste of money for something this small when its easily corrected without any contraptions or harsh methods that most people use now days.
 

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Im not by any means saying that a trainer cant be rewarding...im just saying that in a situation like this it better to try to do things your self the way you want to...for example...she calls a trainer out there for something like this, pays them money to get the horse to do what the trainer wants, than when the trainer leaves, what does she do? so the horse has earned respect for the trainer, but not the rider?..granted the trainer might show her what to do but that just seems like a waste of money for something this small when its easily corrected without any contraptions or harsh methods that most people use now days.
I should have clarified - I would suggest the OP gets a trainer out to work with her and the horse, together. If the OP doesn't know how to deal with the problem on her own, there's only so much one can tell another online - having someone right there in person showing the OP exactly what to do, and watching (and coaching) the OP right then and there would, in my opinion, be best. I do not think sending this horse to a pro for 30 days would help at all; the OP needs to learn how to deal with the problem.
 

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Couple questions for you.

If the horse is well-trained then I don't really understand why you let him sniff the saddle pad and the saddle? He knows what they are, he knows what you are doing with them....?

Other question, what side were you saddling from? My horses have always been 2 sided so when I got a new walking horse over the summer and went to saddle her from the "wrong" side, she shied away from me so quickly that my saddle hit the dirt. I thought she was spooked or that she'd been man-handled. It wasn't until the next time I saddled her that I thought about what I was doing, when I went to the "correct" side to tack her up, she didn't move an inch. She's only been mounted and tacked from the one side before. (I'm changing that)... I like a 2-sided horse.

I'm not saying that's your issue but it could be something that simple, especially if this horse is well-trained.
 

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I should have clarified - I would suggest the OP gets a trainer out to work with her and the horse, together. If the OP doesn't know how to deal with the problem on her own, there's only so much one can tell another online - having someone right there in person showing the OP exactly what to do, and watching (and coaching) the OP right then and there would, in my opinion, be best. I do not think sending this horse to a pro for 30 days would help at all; the OP needs to learn how to deal with the problem.
well I think we would both agree that she needs to figure out if shes going to have any more ground problems before she starts riding, if so, and she isnt able to correct them herself, than yes, a having a trainer come out to guide her would be best.
 

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Please check the saddle pad to see if there is anything pokey or sharp. Check your saddle fit. Your horse is trying to tell you there is a problem and you aren't listening.
 

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Well, it sounds to me that he's not afraid of it, but just anticipating you slamming it on his back. I'm thinking the person before you was just throwing both things on him, instead of just setting the saddle and blanket on nice and easy. If he was afraid of it, he would do more than just spin and than settle down once both are on him. I'm talking bucking, kicking, rearing...all that good stuff. It's going to take some time, but don't be afraid, just put on the saddle pad nice and easy. When he goes to move, back him up as many steps as he took forward and say "stand." Keep doing that, and do the same with the saddle. I'm not saying stand there for 3 hours and keep backing him up, but do it a couple times, and when you get both on there and he moves, back him up.

As for the cinch tightening...a lot of horses are girthy like that. I can't really blame them, because I would hate having a cinch around my belly and getting tightened. Just don't worry about that, what you need to do first is work on him standing still for you when you put the saddle pad and saddle on. Besides, them not liking the cinching process isn't dangerous unless they start striking out, but I've never saw a horse strike out when getting its girth tightened.

Never say never though lol
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Please don't call me unexperienced. I've grown up with horses all my life. We had 15+ at some points. A few years ago, my parents split and decided to sell the farm. We had 15 horses to get rid of. Once we got rid of the mares, we had 2 studs left. A 10 yr old and a 2 yr old. When my dad would handle our 10 yr old, he would prance and dance, especially around the mares. But if I were to take him and walk him by the mares, he was the most well behaved horse ever. He wouldn't swish his tail or stomp his foot. Sure he'd look at them but he knew better with me. Can you name one unexperienced person who can train a stallion to be that way around mares? I was about 15 when I taught him this. I taught him that when we brought him in the barn in the winter, on my command of "get it there" he trotted over to his stall, walked in, turned around and looked at me. He was the sweetest horse and I wish I would've never sold him. Now my 2 yr old was the sweetest guy. He didn't like anyone but me which was sorta a problem. But he was mine. I halter broke him, and trained him to pick up all four of his feet with no problem. Find me an unexperienced person who can train a 2 yr old stallion to do these things, sure they're simple, but you have to know what you're doing.
I'm not trying to be witchy about this, so don't assume I am.
Please don't call someone unexperienced, until you know for sure.
 

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I can sympathize with you--I am currently working with my gelding Patches to overcome this annoying habit.

In my case, I am not certain if it is a trust issue--Patches has ALWAYS done this. With previous owners, trainers, etc. Basically, I'm taking it very slow, and so far he is doing great. I have tacked him up twice without him moving his feet (and he wasn't tied). The key is to take as long as it takes--horses can sense when you are in a hurry and will act accordingly. :) Just go slow at his pace...don't push him beyond what he can bear.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Ok so today I went up to see him and was going to try to saddle him. I went out and haltered him and was walking to the barn and he was quite calm and all of the sudden without any warning or notice, he started to rear and ended up kicking me in the back in the process. he was walking beside calm and nice and just scared the heck out of me. then he just took off running without notice. I tried to catch his lead, but he started bucking, and I didn't want to get kicked. So yeah. idk what to do now. I did talk to a trainer in my area today, and he gave me some advice. I'll try it and see what happens.
 

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sounds like he was being a putz because he didn't want to leave the herd. He sounds like he may end up having some hidden issues.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I talked to a trainer and he was thinking maybe he was sedated? I was wondering the same thing.
 
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