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Hi! I am hoping to be able to open a boarding stable in the near future in FL. I am going to be buy land and building on it. I am in FL so I am thinking of going with a steel horse barn. Ideas on that? They have some that are like huge half circle type ones and my dad thinks those may be the best in FL because of the weather we receive.
Also I'm trying to figure out boarding packages I guess. I want to have a few packages for boarders to choose from. Ideas for packages and prices. I will be feeding/my stable hand will help if it takes off like I am hoping.
Also I need to know about insurance for my stable.
This is about where I am at. Its a big process and I am taking It slow to make sure I do it right :)
All information will be helpful! Thanks!
Boarders what do you like in your boarding facilities and owners just give me some great advice please :)
 

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For such a large undertaking you need to do a feasibility study. By that you need to call around and get prices of the building, fencing, windows, doors. It is possible to get package prices on the building. You will have to call several insurance companies for rates and you want to be sure it covers fire and liability. It may take you 6 mo to gather all the info but it can be an eye opener as to whether or not you wish to proceed. I can see it costing between 1/4 and 1/2 a million from what you describe.
 

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I would take the feasibility study one step further and do an actual business plan. If money is tight you can get books from barnes and noble on how to research and write a business plan. If you ever want a loan, the bank will ask for one (or ohmygoodness they should.)

A business plan is just that, a PLAN. It outlines how you will market your facility, who your competition is and what they offer, what services you will offer, when you will offer them, and what feed plan you will manage to. It describes your expenses (liabilities), assets, and income projections, how you will operate, your boarder policies and guidelines, how you will kick people out. It gets you thinking about your mission. What you stand for. How you will treat others, their horses, and expect to be treated.

If you are not willing to spend the time to research how to do a business plan, and then take the time to actually write it, my advice is not to do this. Every entrepreneur I have coached who has said they didn't have time, it wasn't worth it has gone out of business and lost his/her shirt in the process.

I met a boarding facility last week in the search for my horse's new home and the woman had no clue what she would do and how she would do it. Clearly, she wasn't ready to care for my horse or take my money.

What you are embarking on is a commitment to others. Be prepared. have a plan.

Sorry. Didn't mean to preach. I feel strongly about business plans, if you couldn't tell. :lol::lol:
 

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I would take the feasibility study one step further and do an actual business plan. If money is tight you can get books from barnes and noble on how to research and write a business plan. If you ever want a loan, the bank will ask for one (or ohmygoodness they should.)

A business plan is just that, a PLAN. It outlines how you will market your facility, who your competition is and what they offer, what services you will offer, when you will offer them, and what feed plan you will manage to. It describes your expenses (liabilities), assets, and income projections, how you will operate, your boarder policies and guidelines, how you will kick people out. It gets you thinking about your mission. What you stand for. How you will treat others, their horses, and expect to be treated.

If you are not willing to spend the time to research how to do a business plan, and then take the time to actually write it, my advice is not to do this. Every entrepreneur I have coached who has said they didn't have time, it wasn't worth it has gone out of business and lost his/her shirt in the process.

I met a boarding facility last week in the search for my horse's new home and the woman had no clue what she would do and how she would do it. Clearly, she wasn't ready to care for my horse or take my money.

What you are embarking on is a commitment to others. Be prepared. have a plan.

Sorry. Didn't mean to preach. I feel strongly about business plans, if you couldn't tell. :lol::lol:

Well said!
I would like to add building from scratch is tough and takes years to recoup funds (building plans, codes, inspections, building and planning, fire prevention and etc)
Find out how many horses your property can have on it (box stalls). Do a comparison of prices at facilities in your area and what they offer. Use that guideline for your facility.
Find out how much in hay you will be using and factor that into your monthly costs.
You speak of barn help so factor in your hired labor per month.
Always allow an maintenance expense per month.
Don't forget insurance costs.
Make sure you have a good solid boarding contracts and barn rules (insurance company will require these) I would recommend a professional or equine lawyer help with the boarding contract.

Also remember horses are large, dangerous, and destructive creatures so make allowance for repairs. I have my boarders pay a security deposit and it is written in the contract the boarder is responsible if their horse or them break anything at the stable.
 
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