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**Mod note; SolomonShawn has copied the below word for word from ACinATX https://www.horseforum.com/horse-talk/horse-color-riding-discipline-812949/

Maybe everyone just knows this, but personally I have only recently noticed that red horses seem to be favored in Western disciplines (where they are called sorrel) and disfavored in English disciplines (where they are called chestnut). Is it a thing, and everyone knows it, and I just wasn't aware?

I remember in the only real horse show I ever went to, in the adult section, every horse was bay or gray. And now that I've been reading a lot of books by authors who come from a Western tradition, I see a lot of chestnuts and bays in the pictures, but almost no grays.
 

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I think it might just be in my area, but at jackpots in the upper area, 85% of the barrel horsea are some kind of palomino. Jackpots near the southern area consist of mainly pintos/paints.

At racetracks, a quarter horse field consists of chestnuts and bays. Pretty rare to find a grey. More rare to find a black. And extremely rare to find a palomino, roan, buckskin, etc. On the other hand, a thoroughbred field consists of bays, blacks, and greys. It is really rare to find a chestnut (believe it or not).
 

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Maybe everyone just knows this, but personally I have only recently noticed that red horses seem to be favored in Western disciplines (where they are called sorrel) and disfavored in English disciplines (where they are called chestnut). Is it a thing, and everyone knows it, and I just wasn't aware?
The "Western disciplines love sorrels" thing might be due to the King Ranch and it's breeding program more than anything else.

The King Ranch is the largest ranch in Texas, has been for over a century and a half. They were one of the first programs to breed Quarter-type horses in large quantities and improve upon them.

And they're foundation stud was a sorrel. By the ever so creative name of:- https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Old_Sorrel

And the first Quarter horse ever registered? A sorrel double bred grandson of Old Sorrel. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wimpy_P-1
 

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I see an equal number of "red horses" in English or western riding.
"Plain" is still breathtaking when the sun glints across a shiny coat...
Add a bit of chrome, white markings and time to catch your breath gorgeous.
Secretariat comes to mind instantly for his nickname "Big Red" and many, oh so many of his offspring had the same gorgeous coat and chrome.
Thoroughbreds and Quarter Horses, I saw plenty of all colors of the spectrum appear.
Palomino, Gray and Dapple Gray, Bays of all shades, Chestnut and Sorrel, Tri-Color Paint or Pinto {since pinto is color not breed}Duns, Roans, Grulla, Black, some sooty black/gray and some unknown what they were but pretty...so very pretty

A luck of the draw what color appearance you got, all are beautiful. :cool:
:runninghorse2:...
 

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On the other hand, a thoroughbred field consists of bays, blacks, and greys. It is really rare to find a chestnut (believe it or not).
It must be regional. At one stable I used to work at, we had quite a handful of chestnut OTTBs!
Yea. We're not best known for thoroughbreds. On the other hand, we're known for the birthplace of quarter horse racing and having a good range of racing quarters.
 

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That's bizarre your post was copied!

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Within the western disciplines the cutter/cowhorse people, including myself like the sorrels, bays and roans. And many will tell you so (along with the genetics.)
The cutting barn I work at there are about 50 head of horses including broodmares, turnback horses, weanlings and show horses. I'd say 90% are sorrel, the rest bays and roans. The oddballs are a grey, dun and palomino that are the trainers personal rope horses.

While color isn't a big factor for me I have my preferences and dislikes. I really don't like the Cremellos. A friend had one for sale recently and wondered why he wasn't selling. I told her she needed to advertise him elsewhere. People around here don't like the light colored, pink skinned, blue eyed horses.
 

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Pretty funny :)

As has been stated in several different ways, Sorrel is just the most common Quarter Horse color. Same reason that Red Roan and Red Dun are more common than the others respectively in Quarter Horses.

As for preference, first of all "Western" is a huge category with lots of different disciplines and concentrated blood lines in several of those. For example right now you are going to see loads of Red Roans in Cutting thanks to the popularity of Metallic Cat and lots of Paints due to the popularity of Gunner and his sons in Reining.

In sports like roping you'll see a lot of whatever, including quite a few grades because although blood lines are always interesting they aren't what is very important.
 

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If you see a thread or post you suspect has been copied please report it. These spammers are then replying to their own threads and inserting links in the new material.
 

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/URL]

Maybe everyone just knows this, but personally I have only recently noticed that red horses seem to be favored in Western disciplines (where they are called sorrel) and disfavored in English disciplines (where they are called chestnut). Is it a thing, and everyone knows it, and I just wasn't aware?

I remember in the only real horse show I ever went to, in the adult section, every horse was bay or gray. And now that I've been reading a lot of books by authors who come from a Western tradition, I see a lot of chestnuts and bays in the pictures, but almost no grays.
thankyou my issue has been solved
 

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If you see a thread or post you suspect has been copied please report it. These spammers are then replying to their own threads and inserting links in the new material.
/URL]

Maybe everyone just knows this, but personally I have only recently noticed that red horses seem to be favored in Western disciplines (where they are called sorrel) and disfavored in English disciplines (where they are called chestnut). Is it a thing, and everyone knows it, and I just wasn't aware?

I remember in the only real horse show I ever went to, in the adult section, every horse was bay or gray. And now that I've been reading a lot of books by authors who come from a Western tradition, I see a lot of chestnuts and bays in the pictures, but almost no grays.
thankyou my issue has been solved
@QtrBel , like this? The "OP" seems to link in discord...
 
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