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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Has anyone had a horse dna test done from Texas A&M university. I purchased a really nice mare. She had no papers. Sold as a warmblood cross. I thought I may have seen Andalusian, and or quarter horse possibly to be part of the mix but interesting to see the results. I just want to see what came up just for fun. I just enjoy reading about their ancestors was hoping to be able to look up some of her heritage. My paint was registered and it was fun to trace him back to war admiral. My daughter and I sent in some hair from mane and we just got the results in. How accurate are these tests?She does have some medium knee action so it certainly is interesting. Does anyone know want first, second and third assignments mean?
These are the results
 

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Your horse has the most Caspian DNA, some Lippizaner, and some Hackney. The 1st, 2nd, and 3rd are just showing the top 3 DNA that your horse has, 1st being the most prominent and 3rd being the least. (She is beautiful btw) Hope this helps!
 

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The way it works is they scan for specific DNA "tags" that are more prevalent in certain breeds than others. They aren't very accurate in horses just yet. As @VanessaWolf already explained, 1st means the most prevalent breed in the mix, 2nd means the second-most prevalent breed, and 3rd means the third-most prevalent breed. Essentially, the DNA tags matched their logged Caspian tags the most, and so on. It isn't very accurate because they don't use many tags, and when you combine certain breeds' tags, the outcome of tags can match a totally different breed closer than the original breeds.

The test they use for dog breeds isn't perfect either, but it's better than horses because dogs tend to have much more unique traits compared to horses. For example, it's quite hard to tell apart most of the warmblood breeds even though they are logged as completely separate breeds, whereas you can tell apart a Great Dane from a Chihuahua from a Corgi from a German Shepherd just with one glance.

I'm definitely not buying Caspian as #1. I can certainly see Lipizzaner and Hackney, though!
 

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@Aprilswissmiss that is why I actually posted this question on here. I had assumed Caspian would of been the least but it said 1st assigned so that did make me second guess how this was layed out. I do have the groups I will post. Maybe Caspians was on both sides even if farther back as to why it came up that way or in that group.
 

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That would line up with Warmblood breeding and suggest any cross is one that has a high degree of DNA from one of the groups that make up the typical Warmblood (as opposed to warmblood).



Basically the more unexpected the markers the more intermixing of breeds has occurred. If you had a horse that is registered as a breed with a closed or very limited cross breeding (Quarter horse for example) then you would see that as number one or two depending on whether there is extensive TB in the background or if appendix you could see TB as 1 and QH as 2 but those two would be 1 and 2 with a random for the 3rd. The third could be any marker from a breed that came from a much earlier cross to establish the breed. Because the horse is registered and as long a parents are verified then you know your percentages are heaviest with 1 and lowest with 3. TB you would see TB as 1 and I would think Arabian as 2 though it may be 3 depending on how much ancestry comes from the Barb influence or Turkoman. Since the original TB mares were English that means you could well see something other than those three included depending on their ancestry and whether or not it included any oriental or barb breeding.


If you had a fairly even mix of three then the percentages could theoretically give you 32, 33 and 34% respectively but because horse DNA is fairly close and the markers are limited and the genes aren't being attributed to one parent or the other they present them this way with the disclaimer that just because a breed shows as 1 doesn't mean it is primary if the horse is not registered. Because the breeds do have similar traits and there are only 50 breeds represented (based on how common here in North America and whether there are distinguishing traits) you could see a result that is actually not there but representative of another close breed not on the list.



I would take those results to say Warmblood and if crossed then the cross was another recognized Warmblood or WB cross.
 
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