The Horse Forum banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Sorry to bother anyone if this has been posted before and I have tried using the search without an answer. I'm thinking of buying a Red Dun mare that is seven years old and has tested positive for pssm. It is controlled through diet and exercise and has not exhibited any effects from it. I have talked to the vets but one of the vets is a best friend and other is related but they were both forthcoming with all the information on this horse. That being said I wasn't that worried about it because I would use the same vets. The mares records were open/released to me without a problem. The horse has been trained in Reining and has competed at the local level. The horse is also used for pleasure trail riding and working cattle. My duaghter is thinking of doing some Reining and currently competes in western pleasure. So the horse has some of the skills we need. I'm just wondering what a price reduction is warranted for the PSSM or even if it is warranted? I know the chance I'm taking and even myself not 100% sure if the chance is worth it. But if the price is right. Thoughts? Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,001 Posts
Price is how much you are willing to spend. I don't know enough about the disease to say, but it really just is "what's a deal breaker to you". Think how much, if anything, you are willing to spend on this mare and make an offer. Don't think about a "technical amount" because it doesn't exist, and also depends on the person. For example, cribbing is a common thing, for some people a complete deal breaker others could care less, and then there are people who might ask to lower the price, but would be willing for the right price to take the horse.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,337 Posts
I would want to know if she tested P1/P1 or n/P1. It can make a large difference in how she might react later on, which is when most horses will show more severe effects of the disease. If she's n/P1 I'd probably be ok with her, control everything with diet and exercise. If she's P1/P1, I'd probably walk away, just too much chance of things going south later on.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,285 Posts
I won't touch a horse with PSSM. Even though they are maintained now doesn't mean a month from now they will be. It can change quickly and drastically and it isn't a easy nor pleasant thing to deal with.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,054 Posts
My understanding is they begin to be affected after 15 minutes of work.

Episodes usually begin after very light exercise such as 10-20 minutes of walking and trotting. Horses with PSSM can exhibit symptoms without exercise.

Regular daily exercise is extremely important for managing horses with PSSM. Even 10 min of exercise has been shown to be extremely beneficial in reducing muscle damage with exercise. Once conditioned, some PSSM horses thrive with 4 days of exercise as long as they receive daily turn out. For riding horses with type 2 PSSM, a prolonged warm-up with adequate stretching is recommended. Rest periods that allow horses to relax and stretch their muscles between 2 – 5 min periods of collection under saddle may be of benefit.

The greatest difficulty in owning a horse with PSSM is the time commitment to keep the horse fit and the moderate expense of special feeds.

Polysaccharide Storage Myopathy - CVM - UMEC, University of Minnesota
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,020 Posts
Have heard people say they would rather care/manage horse with HYPP over one with PSSM.:-(
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,141 Posts
I honestly am surprised that this is not a "free" horse. This just sounds like one huge vet bill to me. One I certainly would not PAY to get.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
397 Posts
I personally wouldn't put out any amount of money for a horse with PSSM that I intended on competing on in any way.

I have a horse with HYPP and although I love him dearly and he will be with me until his dying day if I had had to pay a cent for him he wouldn't be with me today.

I'm just not willing to put out good money for a horse that will need so much maintenance.

IMO you would be doing the current owners a favor taking the horse for free although I doubt they will see it that way.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,285 Posts
Good luck! I hope you find the perfect reiner. Your daughter is going to have so much fun, reining is a blast. I breed reining horses and I couldn't imagine my life with out them.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top