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I agree with those who say not to hard tie a horse that pulls back. If you want them to get over it, use the tie blocker or wrap the lead but don't tie it.

If the horse never feels trapped again, she will eventually stop pulling back. Pulling back is caused by a claustrophobic fear that the horse will not be able to get away. If the horse gets a release every time they feel afraid or claustrophobic, eventually they will believe that they will never be trapped, and will stop testing to see if they are trapped or not.

When a horse gets panicked hard tied, they can cause serious outward injuries, but also they can cause damage to neck vertebrae, discs, or damage to facial nerves.

I find it safer to avoid hard tying horses. I've seen older horses that never pulled back suddenly pull back and seriously injure themselves
 

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Rubber gloves over your main gloves woukd make things worse. Think about the typical experiment to show static electricty. Balloons on hair. Basically any material can generate static. Personally if it's a problem I woukd just get into the habit of touching somthing metal periodically. Eventually it will become a habit and you won't have to think about.
 

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Rubber gloves over your main gloves woukd make things worse. Think about the typical experiment to show static electricty. Balloons on hair. Basically any material can generate static. Personally if it's a problem I woukd just get into the habit of touching somthing metal periodically. Eventually it will become a habit and you won't have to think about.

thanks for clarifying. is there a material for gloves that won't generate static? leather?
 

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Not really. Static electricty is generated when the negatively charged electrons are rubbed of onto the glove from the horse. This leaves the horse positively charged and you negatively charged. So when you make contact the electrons flow till they are balanced again. Soory if that was exesivly sciencey lol. There are gloves out there that are anti static that are meant for working with computers. However I don't know how well they would hold up. They are cheap though. Might be worth a try.
 

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Leather gloves and natural fibres would likely have less static than anything synthetic. Fleece is the worst for generating static in my experience. Be extra careful with anything fleece - gloves, sweaters, hats, jackets, horse blankets.
 

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She's never broken a halter or lead before, but she will ONLY stop if she feels the release of pressure.
Then I'm really surprised the blocker tie ring doesn't work for her since the whole premise of it is that the horse has no pressure to fight against.

Some people will just hard tie them with a strong halter or two on a heavy rope or chain to a stout tree and let them "learn the hard way" that they can't escape. I've known of horses who were badly injured with this method and at least one yearling who broke its neck and died.

I'd use the blocker tie ring to avoid any possible wrecks and damage to my horse. I've never had a horse that needed one, but my understanding is the set-up allows the horse to go back without any tension to fight until it hits the end of the rope. By then, most horses have gone far enough back that they are okay and have stopped themselves.

You probably said, but is this issue mostly on cross-ties or does it happen when straight tied too? When I'm teaching young horses to cross-tie, I always leave their lead ropes hooked to their halters and just dropped on the floor in front of them or over their necks or tucked up on one side with the cross tie. This way if they start to go and break the cross-ties, I can grab the lead rope attached to them and try to settle them, and at least keep them from gaining complete freedom and running away totally.

But yeah, get some static guard or fabric softener or whatever and that will at least help eliminate the unpleasant static electricity. I can't blame horses for reacting to that. I hate it too. I tend to jump a little when I get shocked by a door handle or whatever. If someone then punished me for that reaction, I'd be even more anxious and reactive about it. I'd also start to lose trust in the person who is punishing me for a totally understandable reaction to an unpleasant situation (getting shocked by static electricity).
 

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Discussion Starter · #50 ·
Then I'm really surprised the blocker tie ring doesn't work for her since the whole premise of it is that the horse has no pressure to fight against.

Some people will just hard tie them with a strong halter or two on a heavy rope or chain to a stout tree and let them "learn the hard way" that they can't escape. I've known of horses who were badly injured with this method and at least one yearling who broke its neck and died.

I'd use the blocker tie ring to avoid any possible wrecks and damage to my horse. I've never had a horse that needed one, but my understanding is the set-up allows the horse to go back without any tension to fight until it hits the end of the rope. By then, most horses have gone far enough back that they are okay and have stopped themselves.

You probably said, but is this issue mostly on cross-ties or does it happen when straight tied too? When I'm teaching young horses to cross-tie, I always leave their lead ropes hooked to their halters and just dropped on the floor in front of them or over their necks or tucked up on one side with the cross tie. This way if they start to go and break the cross-ties, I can grab the lead rope attached to them and try to settle them, and at least keep them from gaining complete freedom and running away totally.

But yeah, get some static guard or fabric softener or whatever and that will at least help eliminate the unpleasant static electricity. I can't blame horses for reacting to that. I hate it too. I tend to jump a little when I get shocked by a door handle or whatever. If someone then punished me for that reaction, I'd be even more anxious and reactive about it. I'd also start to lose trust in the person who is punishing me for a totally understandable reaction to an unpleasant situation (getting shocked by static electricity).
Thanks for laying it out, that really helps! I have never tied her in cross ties before, just straight tied to the blocker tie ring. When she pulls back, she feels the release of pressure and stops setting back after 3 or 4 steps. What I mean by it not working is that she still pulls back 5+ times when grooming because she knows she can get away with it.
 

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I think her getting away with it is fine, because she does stop. What you are avoiding is her panicking. If she gets to where she panics tied hard, then is when it becomes a big problem. Right now you are avoiding that, and likely she will eventually stop it.
 
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