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Cherie, are you saying that you suspect an abcess, even after seeing the shape and size of the fetlock in that photo? I know that the aforesaid windpuffs might account for part of that, but it does look really odd to me.
 

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Those pics aren't all that helpful. (& rotating them the right way would help too). It appears the fetlock might be swollen(& you say it is anyway), but could be the angle of the pics & way she's standing. & does she always cock that leg? Good hoof pics may help discover more, as it appears they could be long & contracted, but again, can't be sure with those angles. If hooves are compromised, that could be the source of fetlock strain.
 

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When a horse gets 3 legged lame I ALWAYS suspect an abscess. It is just that over 90% of the time. That means that 10% of the time it is not.

Those big ugly wind-puffs hardly ever cause lameness. I was more concerned about the 'thick' look of the stifle area. But, checking for heat early in the morning is the most efficient and by far the cheapest way to sort it out. If there is an abscess in a hoof, the leg above it will often be swollen, so you still have to see if the hoof is warm. Heat goes up and not down.

I had a trainer (riding and showing my horse) tell me that my horse was 'off' in his right front leg. He wanted my OK to take the horse to a big equine clinic in Pilot Point Texas to be blocked and x-rayed. I asked if he had had the farrier use hoof testors on him. He said he had the farrier found nothing. The bill would be over $1000.00 just for the diagnosis if the horse went to big equine clinic.

I told him to wait and that I would haul the horse down there (instead of his assistant) if I could not figure out what was wrong. I was at his barn the next morning at 6 AM before the Mexicans fed. I found the right front hoof warm and took the horse home. An abscess popped on his coronet about a week later. I never took him back. That was the last time I tried to get someone to show a horse for me after my back got bad enough that I could not show my own horses.

I'll take an early morning check over hoof testers, x-rays and nerve blocks every time.
 

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Discussion Starter #24
Thanks for the tips of the early morning check Cherie, I will do that tomorrow.

Loosie, no that foot is not normally cocked, that is the foot she will not bear weight on.

I called my farrier (please remember this is more of a cowboy here) and he said he would come out tonight so we just got done looking at her together. He investigated the hoof really thoroughly and is pretty convinced it's not an abscess. I will post another pic with weight on the hoof and him pointing to the swollen area. His suggestion was a dexamethazone injection & to treat with the dex for a few days. I decided to hold off until I could get a vet out. I called my father who is a vet and he said no to the dex. He suggested banamine without having much info. Farrier said banamine is hard to get.

Tomorrow a friend has a good trainer coming to see his horses so he is going to check her out as well. Until I can get a vet here that is the best I can do. I have her confined for the night.

Sorry the pics keep rotating I am doing a mobile upload so maybe that is why...
 

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Discussion Starter #25
So I followed Cherie's advice and went out first thing this morning to check for heat. All legs were cold but the affected back left was warm from about the stifle down.

This most interesting thing I found though is when I palpitated around the stifle up towards the hip, it was the first time I got a noticeable reaction- pressure about 6 inches below the hip bone causes her to jerk her leg up right away. Cherie you have eagle eyes because you noticed the thick looking stifle which have me the idea to palpatate the area. I immediately thought it was hoof/fetlock but now I think the issue may be higher up.

Some research returns information about patellar luxation which looks awfully similar to what she is doing, except for the locking sound. I found some videos of this condition, I am going to take a video of her movement and compare.

Hopefully I can get more information today.

Thanks
 

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That area on your mare bothered me more than anything else I saw. It is usually a deep muscle / ligament injury that makes them sore there. You can tell the exact spot by having someone pull on their tail to make them stand on it and then pushing your finger-tips into the side of theri hip from top to bottom and left to right. They will tell you exactly where the injury is. It sounds like you may have already found it.

When a muscle or muscles in that area are injured, I have never seen them regain soundness without having the the area injected with a deep muscle injection that my Vet calls an 'internal blister'. He has injected several horses for me over the years and every one of them has regained complete soundness including one I turned out for 1 year and she still went lame when I tried to ride her. Other Vets said she was crippled and would never be sound. She became completely sound after 3 injections.

I have one now that has been injected twice and may need another or more. She is much better, but she is a very good horse and I do not want her going lame when we go back to using her. This Vet has barrel horses and roping horses brought to him from all across the US and Canada. I have usually diagnosed them when I bring them to him.

Good luch with your. It is not an easy fix.
 

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Discussion Starter #27
Here is a short video of where she reacts to the pressure, it's not long but it's the best angle of where I think the the pain is.

Cherie you may be spot on about the internal blister, I was reading about that related treatment. Now....if only I can find someone willing to do it (if we are correct about injury). I still have a call into a couple vets hoping someone will come today.

She has always had a really weak hind end which sounds like could attribute to (or be a result of) his issue. Even in consistent hill work (we have LoTs), she has trouble building muscle back there.

I'll have to link to videos:

 

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There was a very definite pain reaction on that one spot on that video you've put up
One thing to remember though is that pain in one place that causes a horse to move unnaturally for even a short length of time will gradually have a 'domino effect' and result in pain from muscle and joint stiffness in other areas that aren't being used correctly
 

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Discussion Starter #29
Vet can't come till maybe afternoon (hopefully) - based on what I told her & the videos she recommended dexamethazone and banamine which is what the local trainer recommended as well (he came by this morning to check her). My dad strongly recommends agains the dex and said definitely not to do both together. :/ we shall see I supposse....
 

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Unless you can stable the horse or confine her in some way I would be nervous about using either in case she's got an injury that's going to be made worse by too much movement
The Dex is a steroid so use with extreme caution if there's the slightest chance your horse has IR, Cushings or is prone to laminitis
 

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Discussion Starter #31
Unless you can stable the horse or confine her in some way I would be nervous about using either in case she's got an injury that's going to be made worse by too much movement
The Dex is a steroid so use with extreme caution if there's the slightest chance your horse has IR, Cushings or is prone to laminitis
I know, I'm worried about the dex too and I've been cautioned about the combo causing ulcers so I'm trying to track down some gastroguard.

I can keep her confined in a small feeding pen. It's not covered though so I don't like keeping her there all day for lack of shade but I can figure something out.

The vet couldn't make it today but she gave dosage and we had the trainer do the dex and the banamine. After a few hours she was markedly better. Then just have instructions to keep her quiet and wait and see for a few days.
 

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I have stayed away from Dex unless it was applied topically to an injury with DMSO. This one is too deep for that to be effective. For me, the negatives outweigh the possible positive results by about 10 to 1.

The improved comfort is only because Banamine is a pain killer just like Bute. It is applying another Aspirin type treatment -- again with more negatives than positives.

If this mare is really as sore, deep in her hip like the video showed, she is going to need a good lameness Vet. Like I've said, personally, I have ONLY found deep internal injections to bring about soundness with an injury like this one. Cheri
 

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I would NOT administer dex unless you have a have a definitive diagnosis of something that requires it.
Dex runs a small risk of causing laminitis in some horses, which is not worth it.

Is she a Peruvian Paso? She looks like some kind of Paso. If so, they are susceptible to developing DSLD, a suspensory ligament degeneration that shows up in the hind legs first. There would be chronic subtle lameness and swelling in the area you pointed to above the fetlock, in the lower branches of the suspensory ligament just above where they connect to the sesamoid bones at the back of the fetlock.
But the history points more toward a foot abscess, with subtle lameness for a day or two then sudden non weight bearing.
Hoof abscess will cause a definite increased digital pulse, but a damaged suspensory ligament would not, if that helps.
 

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Discussion Starter #34
I would NOT administer dex unless you have a have a definitive diagnosis of something that requires it.
Dex runs a small risk of causing laminitis in some horses, which is not worth it.

Is she a Peruvian Paso? She looks like some kind of Paso. If so, they are susceptible to developing DSLD, a suspensory ligament degeneration that shows up in the hind legs first. There would be chronic subtle lameness and swelling in the area you pointed to above the fetlock, in the lower branches of the suspensory ligament just above where they connect to the sesamoid bones at the back of the fetlock.
But the history points more toward a foot abscess, with subtle lameness for a day or two then sudden non weight bearing.
Hoof abscess will cause a definite increased digital pulse, but a damaged suspensory ligament would not, if that helps.
She is a Puerto Rican paso fino, I'm not sure if the have the same tendencies for dsld but I will research it. Still not sign of abscess, she is now weight bearing again. Resting her until further notice...
 

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Discussion Starter #35
I have stayed away from Dex unless it was applied topically to an injury with DMSO. This one is too deep for that to be effective. For me, the negatives outweigh the possible positive results by about 10 to 1.

The improved comfort is only because Banamine is a pain killer just like Bute. It is applying another Aspirin type treatment -- again with more negatives than positives.

If this mare is really as sore, deep in her hip like the video showed, she is going to need a good lameness Vet. Like I've said, personally, I have ONLY found deep internal injections to bring about soundness with an injury like this one. Cheri
A friend found a racetrack vet - I am holding tight for now but we'll see what happens and maybe I can get her out there or him out here. I'm sure he'd be familiar with the internal blister also. 8 hour round trip house call....that should be cheap ;) (it's worth it I'm just joking)
 
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