The Horse Forum banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi. Appreciate any and all information, critiques, ideas about what I should be doing with this sweet gelding. Took in a 4 yr old quarter horse recently who has dropped pasterns/**** footed/possibly straight through the hocks? He was born this way and was put into splints. The vet who took care of him said he is sound to ride but won't hold up to hard riding, sport type stuff...barrels, jumping etc. We just do trail riding and not hard at that. I'm interested to hear what you all think. How can I best take care of him regarding this? He is underweight so we need to bring his weight up. We have the farrier scheduled. Should I be giving him certain supplements to support those suspensory ligaments and joints etc? Any suggestions on what ....please. Should he wear sports medicine boots? I'd think during light building exercise he should not have boots because he need to build strength? During rides perhaps he should wear them? He's young and has a lot of horsing around yet to do and I want to keep him fit and healthy if I can.
Thank you for taking the time to help and respond.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
591 Posts
Should I be giving him certain supplements to support those suspensory ligaments and joints etc?
Supplements would be most effective on top of a well balanced diet to his hay. For the best nutritional support, I really recommend having your hay tested and working with either a unaffiliated nutritionist or company to help balance nutrition based on high/ lows in your area. That can be more or less of an expense, but I've also looked at it as a valuable learning experience for anyone who has horses.

One thing I would avoid is much iron in any feed, as it is an oxidizer and too much will cause copper to be non-effective. Copper plays a role in maintaining healthy connective tissue in ligaments and tendons. Copper, Zinc and Iron should ideally be around a 1:4:4 ratio with copper being a minimum of 100mg per day. Personally, I have not found copper to be sufficient in many feeds/ RB in my area, so If that is the case for you, then I'd recommend supplementation with it. I'd also recommend ensuring your has access to a full spectrum of amino acids, enough Vitamin E and magnesium.

Should he wear sports medicine boots?
There is some controversy on this that since they hold heat, they may not be good for the tensons/ligaments. My horse has DSLD and the way I look at it is that I will use boots on cooler days and leave them bare on hotter days.

and another thing. If you really want to minimize risk, then I would recommend keeping him out of muddy paddocks (anything more than 4cm). This isn't always possible for everyone, but I thought I'd just mention it.

I'd also advise to make sure trimming appointments are close enough together to prevent his toe from getting long enough to put strain on the tendons/ligaments and make sure his heels do not become underrun.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49,436 Posts
He may be more comfortable on hard ground than in a deep arena of sand.


He is VERY straight through the hocks. But, his front legs and pasterns look better, and that's where 60% of the weight is borne.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,333 Posts
When you say "**** footed" and DSLD, I picture this:


Your horse isn't there, and that's a good thing. Definitely keep up with the farrier work and work him to build strength. I tend to not like boots for the simple reason, if the boots are holding him up, then he's not building strength to hold himself up. I favor short, frequent workouts, but not necessarily strenuous ones. He probably feels better on hard ground than soft right now, so I'd do 15 min walks (hand or mounted) along a well packed trail. After a week or 2 of that, go to twice a day, then try 30 mins once a day for a week or so, then twice, etc etc. If he gets sore at any time, back off and let him rest until he's not sore. He'll let you know what works. Once you can ride him for an hour at a time at the walk, then I'd give 5 mins at a jog, then 10, then 15 etc etc. Very low and slow work outs until he's as good as he's going to get.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Everyone who responded THANK YOU so much. I could not get a straight answer for professional who shall remain nameless and it was getting frustrating so I found this online. I just got him so I wanted to get this right straight away. My regular farrier was injured but supposed to be back in July and our back up farrier is coming on the 28th of this month. We trim every 6 weeks. He is on hard ground. He isn't under saddle yet because I wanted to get his feet done and weight up before starting any training. We will start with walks etc after his feet are done. He exercises himself right now and doesn't seem to have any pain. My hay guy is cutting now so he'll have an analysis to me once he's done baling and not so busy and then I'll have the correct information on the new hay and will know how to supplement it. The information on the iron is very useful too. I will keep those ratios handy when I do go to supplement anything. This has been so helpful....blessings to you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,570 Posts
When you talk about getting his weight up.. be aware he will have a better chance of staying sound longer if he stays on the thinner side versus the fatter side. Not sure what 'normal' is for weight in your area, but often horses are kept heavier than necessary because that is what everyone is used to seeing. I am certainly not suggesting starving him, but keeping him at a BCS of 4 vs a 6 will make a difference.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Yes, I'm aware of that but he is very much underweight. His backbone, ribs and hips, top of his tail are all sticking up and prominent. Thin is one thing and this is too thin. He's not scary underweight though. And even in this last week his coat is shedding and he's looking better. Thank you for the comment and concern!
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top