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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My gelding rides and lunges good all except for his trot. He starts out at a slow steady speed (which I would prefer) but while were lunging or riding he will suddenly speed up in to a fast choppy trot. I have had my trainer watch me ride and she cant figure it out. She says you cant tell he is going to do it untill it happens and that I dont do anything to make him speed up. He does this with everyone who rides him. Any suggestions?
 

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does he have tack on, when he speeds up while lunging?!? it may be a tack fit issue.

if not, he may be having issues with finding, keeping his balance. the trot is the hardest gait for a horse to work in.

if it were my horse, i would start with lunging over ground poles and cavalettis (spelling?) to help him learn balance and speed control. this will also help with building muscles. you can also lunge him on a slightly angled bit of ground, to help with balance, speed and muscle building. also, for right now, i would lunge without tack, so that you can watch his body as he works.

hope this helps.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
He has been checked by chiro. and saddle fits properly. and he does this with and without tack.
 

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if not, he may be having issues with finding, keeping his balance. the trot is the hardest gait for a horse to work in.
This. ^^

When a horse can't keep a consistent speed, it usually means they are physically unable to do so due to balance or conditioning.

My horse Red has a hard time keeping his trot balanced. I do LOTS of circle work with him, and bending/flexing work, to get him to engage his body correctly and learn to stay balanced and keep an even rhythm.
 

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And what do you do when he speeds up? Are you half halting (vibrating the line) BEFORE? Horses do what they are allowed to do, and what they can within the balance you have allowed. Start in walk on a small circle. If the horse hurries, stop it. Teach the horse how to slow down.

While riding it is easy. KEEP the same posting tempo, that is a BIG part of it. YOU set the tempo, YOU sustain it. If the horse takes one step quicker, half halt. If that doesn't work do a transition (this should be easily done by the trainer). Is he too low/closed in his head/neck? If so, being onto the forehand causes the horse to 'chase the forehand' and speed up.
 

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You can help them adjust their speed by the rate of your posting. Don't rise and fall to his rhythm, rise and fall to the rhythm you want him to have. My horse who goes way too fast in a trot responds to this and also me gently tugging on the reins a little (we're riding in a bitless bridle) and saying "doucement, doucement" which is like saying "easy, easy" in English.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
When he speeds up I stop him and we start again he will hold a steady pace for a little while and then he starts going fast again. When he gets fast he jerks forward like he is jumping forward and knocks the rider off balance.
 

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Don't know if this helps at all, but my horse does this a bit because he is herd bound. He KNOWS which direction his paddock is, and his stall, and will speed up when heading that way (going either direction).
 

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When he speeds up I stop him and we start again he will hold a steady pace for a little while and then he starts going fast again. When he gets fast he jerks forward like he is jumping forward and knocks the rider off balance.
Mostly likely it's because he is indeed off balance, and/or is lazy and knows that if he speeds up, he'll get a break.

Training a lazy horse to work means that once he does what you want and he is working, it's time to give him a break and rest. Otherwise he'll have no motivation to work. This will also help if he is off balance, because those little-used muscles will get tired fast, and he'll need to rest often.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
He isn't lazy at all. He is always wanting to go. He does this even away from home and we go on very long rides regularly and he is always ready to go.
 

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easy fix. Trot, trot and trot some more. Trot on hills, long trails and uneven ground. Trot circles, serpentines and figure 8's. Don't rate his speed, just keep him in a trot. I suspect this horse a) just doesn't have enough miles on him in a trot covering long distances to learn to rate himself properly for any length of time, and b) he is not in very good shape.
 

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It's kind of hard to understand that a trainer can't figure it out. Your horse may be tuning you out (I call it hanging up the phone) or he's on his forehand and goes faster to prevent falling on his nose. So I think your work is two-fold.

Lots and lots of 20 meter circles. This will teach him to step under more and that will teach him balance. While you do this, practice posting lively and fast, then stop following his movement and get as heavy as you can, like a sack of potatoes, and give half halts till he responds. It might take a while the first time, but you can wait longer than he can. If he pulls at your hands, set them on the pommel and don't move them til he stops pulling. This way he can argue with himself and not you.

Make sure you tell him good boy when he slows as you ask.
He has to learn to listen to you before he can learn that you want to slow down.
 

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He isn't lazy at all. He is always wanting to go. He does this even away from home and we go on very long rides regularly and he is always ready to go.
Lazy doesn't necessarily mean he doesn't like to go. It just means he doesn't like to work, as in move correctly over his back and engage his hind end. Or he just doesn't know how, and is off balance.
 

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I know you've said you've had a chiro out, so not saying it is an issue, but *assuming* the trainer is good, if she can't work it out & especially as you describe it as a sudden, jerky type thing, I'm still going with the body/balance issue as likely reason. Of course, it could be just that the trainer isn't great & it is indeed a training issue that she isn't seeing.

BTW, FWIW, 'horse chiropractics' & the likes is not a regulated profession, over here, like farriery, & this is the case in many other places, so you may get a broad range of knowledge & skill standards under that banner(do you know you can even get 'qualified' in acupuncture online??:shock: Veterinary chiropractors however, must be either a vet or a human chiro first, before completing comprehensive courses, so you at least know their knowledge base is reasonably strong.
 
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