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Elle, 1997 Oldenburg mare
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Do you tend to "pump" with your upper body? As in lean forward on the up part of the stride, and back on the downwards, or are you always far back?
 

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I tend to vary between leaning forward - I'm a western rider who learned the forward seat first - and being vertical. Others vary between vertical and leaning back. If you are always leaning back, then you might try cantering in a half-seat to bring your balance more above your stirrups. A video on various seats from a jumping perspective. I don't jump but I find the video worthwhile:

 

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We can’t correctly judge your position based on a split second shot like the one you’ve posted.

You need to ask someone to video you cantering for at least several circuits of an arena or a decent distance across a field.

Based on that photograph you’ve posted you appear to be completely unbalanced and hanging onto the horse’s head for support. That’s causing the horse some obvious discomfort.

Is the horse maybe inclined to get too strong and try to run through your hands?

Leaning back won’t help in that situation, it will just make things worse.
 

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Elle, 1997 Oldenburg mare
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This might be helpful. It's what I'm working on to help with that upper body pumping too much. I've also found that the better my core strength gets, the less I pump and the more straight up and down I stay. I mean, you do need SOME backwards and forwards in your upper body, but it's pretty minimal.

 

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View attachment 1106743 Hello my names daisy I always lean back in the canter as seen above I don’t know how to fix this issue thanks
that photo shows the split second AFTER the part of the canter stride sequence that has the hosre in the most downhill orientation. This horse is just about ready to lift his front up, so you should be just moving toward nuetral, ready to lean forward the tiniest bit. Additionally, you feet are gripping up. At this point in the canter stride, you should be the absolute MOST down into your stirrups.
I think riding on a lungeline without reins will help you get used to keeping your legs down into the stirrup throughout the canter.
 
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