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I've seen mixed outcomes on line.

Currently, my 4 geldings (who are in a grassy pasture and supplemented with quality coastal) are eating acorns like they are rare delicacies from heaven. They did the same thing 5 years ago when we had a bumper crop of acorns in the Upstate. Cutter, our fluffy Appy, got a belly ache once but other than that, they seemed fine. Still, I am going to put up a temp fence today since they seem unable to control themselves. I may have to send them all to AA. ;)


Are acorns poisonous to horses? | Practical Horseman Magazine
 

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My horse and her pasture buddy both eat acorns. They're both happy and bright-eyed and have normal stools and no problems. We're keeping an eye on their condition Since there are several oak trees in their pasture and nobody wants to walk around every day picking up acorns before the horses can get to them, it's the best we can do. I haven't seen any negative effects.
 

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Thanks for the "misery loves company" thread, lollol

DH caught my insulin resistant horse eating an acorn last weekend:shock:

Actually it was the dog, staring up at the horse, that got his attention.

I have panic attacks, over that horse, if the air we breathe isn't normal so I spent the rest of that day and the next day watching him ----- for nothing ----- he was and still is fine in all ways, one week later.

That doesn't mean there isn't a horse out there that would have some sort of reaction since everything in this life has an exception to the Rule:cowboy:
 

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Not only do we have acorns which they merrily forage for even when premium hay is put out but we have pecan groves and the ******s expect you to shell them for them.....when your back is turned though they do it for themselves readily then they proceed to wash the shells out of their mouths in the water trough. Only problem we have is abscesses from the harder shelled ones that don't crush when they walk on them.
 

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Thanks for the "misery loves company" thread, lollol

DH caught my insulin resistant horse eating an acorn last weekend:shock:

Actually it was the dog, staring up at the horse, that got his attention.

I have panic attacks, over that horse, if the air we breathe isn't normal so I spent the rest of that day and the next day watching him ----- for nothing ----- he was and still is fine in all ways, one week later.

That doesn't mean there isn't a horse out there that would have some sort of reaction since everything in this life has an exception to the Rule:cowboy:
Ha ha! I am a different horse owner than I was 5 years ago. I watched them like hawks that year after terrifying myself with online research about the toxicity of acorns. This year, I'm all *yawn*....I'll take of it when I take care of it. They have lived for a week now, I guess they will keep breathing until I get out there today. LOL!
 

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Amazing that my 13 horses have managed to live in pastures full of black walnut and oak trees!

I have been researching arena footing, and according to one of the websites, the arena must be laser levelled to 1/8 inch per foot, AND be kept smooth to avoid injury to the horse.....Omg, we have been riding in a mowed pasture!! And, it has rocks in it....and my horses RUN in sloping, rocky pastures, without splint boots.

LoL!!!!
 

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Amazing that my 13 horses have managed to live in pastures full of black walnut and oak trees!

I have been researching arena footing, and according to one of the websites, the arena must be laser levelled to 1/8 inch per foot, AND be kept smooth to avoid injury to the horse.....Omg, we have been riding in a mowed pasture!! And, it has rocks in it....and my horses RUN in sloping, rocky pastures, without splint boots.

LoL!!!!
I have settled down as a horse keeper but I'm still that rider though! That arena will be lazer leveled and splint boots are nonnegotiable! ;)
 

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My neighbors have oak trees that of course drop acorns...lots of acorns.
Luckily I have no tress that drop those menaces...at least in my paddock area or pasture.
So last year her mare ate, ate and ate some more acorns...had a reaction of course.
She had a reaction to "tannin"....
It can affect the kidneys, liver and do something to protein levels but I am unsure of what exactly.

Just so anyone is aware....
Acorns are not a joking matter for those whose horses ingest them in any amount.
Here is an excerpt from a article written I will link to..

The signs of acorn poisoning can be: loss of appetite, excessive salivation, blood in the urine or manure, colic-like pain, slow or irregular heart-rate, elevated temperature, pale mucous membranes, watery eyes and a depressed attitude. In the early stages manure is hard and dark in color; the horse may be constipated. Often, in the later stage, the manure changes to diarrhea. Mouth ulcers may form; salvia may escape from the nose. In extreme cases liver and kidney failure ensues and other organs begin to hemorrhage. Some poisoned horses may develop laminitis.
http://www.thewayofhorses.com/10_08_acorns.html

And another article about the dangers of horses and acorns...
http://www.horse-advice.com/equestrian/equine-veterinary/acorns-poisonous.shtml

As for the rest of our "pampering" of our horses with this, that and everything else we do...
Most we do "for us"....
Horses were here long before we were born, will be here long after we are dead and the simpler their life and all it encompasses the better they survive and thrive...
A healthy horse is perfectly able to acclimate and accommodate our wishes without us going to extremes to baby-them...from food to riding surfaces, to stabling and farrier work to just everything we do with and for them.
I say that as I am blanket shopping since my guys blanket is not in good condition but falling apart after washing...:icon_rolleyes:

:runninghorse2:......


 

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^^^all things in moderation -- especially the eating of acorns by a horse.

I used to like my share of Jack Daniels but I wasn't so big of a pig that I thought I had to drink the entire bottle, lol

Every Fall it is something new (and toxic) for one of my horses to ingest.

One thing we all agree on, is they are suicidal, should be born in a permanent wrapping of bubble wrap ----- and the inability to get acorns or any other toxic "thing" in their mouths:)
 

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Discussion Starter #10
My husband put up temporary keep out fencing. So now they have moved onto overdosing on the mineral block. :)
 
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I've spent a lot of horse owning years keeping them in pasture that was either adjacent to oak trees or had oak trees in it and in all of that time have had only two horses suffer ill effects from eating acorns - and both were so ill it's made me very cautious about allowing them to eat even a few now.
 

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Yep, many years ago my champion mare had a feast on acorns and got sick. Vet said it was the tannic acid in the acorns. MY other 2 weren't interested, but then all mares are known for being eating machines!
 

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Neighbours had several brood mares and come September they would turn out one of the stallions with the herd of mares. In two weeks this stud lost a lot of weight. I didn't think a great deal about it as he had been herding the mares a lot. However he then appeared very sick, it was acorn poisoning. He was dead two weeks later.

Tradition in the New Forest is that pigs are turned out to eat the acorns, they don't harm pigs, so the ponies cannot glut on acorns.
 

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I guess it really depends. Some horses might react, others may not. Redz hasn't really eaten any, not sure if he ever has...hmm!
 

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I'm going to go out on a limb and guess that you heard something about acorn poisoning which started you worrying.

The thing about acorns is: yes, they are not good for your horse. The acids in them can result in kidney damage over time (more acorns, more damage sort of thing). Now some horses have a greater reaction to them and can get acorn poisoning (in which case you don't have to wait for the kidney problems since they're already having a reaction to the toxin) :). If they ingest small amounts while the bulk of they diet remains large quantities of the long fiber their system is designed for (grass and low quality hay) then it shouldn't have an effect (bit like us getting arsenic from various vegetables) unless they are already sensitive to them.

So the simple answer is that for their long term health (avoiding kidney damage from the acids) it's best to limit the intake of acorns. If they are sensitive to them then restrict their access to acorns.
 

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Well, one less thing for me to worry about I suppose. I've got to worry about mountain lions, coyotes, rattlesnakes, cacti, rocks, sun exposure/overheating, water intake, lack of enough forage... but at least I don't have to worry about acorns. :lol:
 
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Some horses might only eat a few, but others might become addicted, so , as in all things , prevention is best
I spent one summer making sure no hemlock was growing around our dug out, having lost a calf to it, years ago,, even though chances of horses with plenty of pasture, eating hemlock being remote
Hubby brought home a yew tree, from one of his construction sites. I planted it in the back yard, but after reading how toxic it was to horses, dug it up again, just on the off chance they would ingest some needles, allowed to graze on the back lawn, briefly
 

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It also depends on the time of year and amount of rainfall in your area. Green, fresh fall are the most toxic. The ones that have sat and had time to ripen (turn brown) and been rained on are leached of much of the tannic acid. Makes them sweeter and this is typically when most will go after them. I wish I had a pig to turn loose on the wooded areas but my husband hates pigs. We raised one (wild - mother was killed) from a wee baby until it started tearing the pen up and then we had to find it another home or he threatened to put it in the freezer.
 
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