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I'm a country girl at heart, though currently living in London..
I'm at a fantastic yard, however hacking and turnout is compromised unfortunately *sigh*
Luckily I only lease, so it's not too much trouble, how do other users combine living in the city with a horsey lifestyle? That's if anyone else lives in the city at all...everyone on here seems to live on endless farmland! :D
 

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I think country folk would consider where I live to be "the city". On Long Island (New York) horse owners have to make a lot of sacrifices, with space is a huge issue.

I've found a lot of commercial barns have very limited turn out and are over crowed in my opinion. That means they measure turn out in hours and turn out size in feet. Commercial barns tend to be more expensive and will cost you about $800 a month for basic full board. If your looking at a show barn it's going to be in the thousands.

Then there is your backyard barns. They are easier on the budget, typically priced between $500-$700. Again, turnout tends to be limited more in size then in time.

To get a "country feel" you have to go all the way east, about an hour from me. Although it's just as expensive there is at least a little more room. It's certainly not practical though unless you move out there.

All and all, I love living in a place where there is things to do. I can hop on a train and by in NYC in 45 minutes, I've got a beach in every direction, movies, shopping... we have it all. And if we don't it's close by. My only complaint is it's not ideal for horse ownership.
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I ran into someone that said she worked in Chicago riding horses down the city block from the barn to the arena where the owners were waiting.

I was looking for a winter riding gloves and she claimed she used the best ones. Top dollar but worth it for windy Chicago winters.

I could not afford them and don't recall the brand.
 

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Somewhere along the line I had to choose.

I wasn't okay with keeping my horses without turnout, because that's something I value a lot, plus the cost was substantial.

When I was 17, I moved out of home, sold my horse, moved to the city. It's something that I had always wanted to do. I didn't grow up in a country town, but it wasn't the big city, there were always plenty of horse places and riding areas around. After living in the city for a while... well I decided that there were things I valued more. Now, I choose the places I live partly on horses, but just generally on how it will suit my lifestyle. I don't live on farms or in country towns really, but just smaller cities perhaps surrounded by rural areas. Places where I can have a somewhat cityish culture and my horses.

Some people keep horses in the city, and that's their choice, it's just not for me.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
In an ideal world, I would have horses kept turned out 24/7 on huge farms roaming the countryside, but realistically, that's not always possible :/
Many horses thrive in their city homes though, and they bring a chance for people that do live in cities to experience what it's like to be around horses, and this can be life changing - it certainly was for me, especially coming from a totally non-horsey background!
 

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It sounds lovely but not at all practical - they'd all get very fat and laminitic!!!
In London you're a very short train ride away from lots of country places - if you want a change of riding experience why not go on a trekking weekend in a rural area?
 

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I used to board my horse 15min from downtown Vancouver. I don't miss the small turnout (barn I was at was 2.2 acre and had about 30 horses) and expensive prices (I think board is now around $900 a month now, and when that barn was for sale a little while back it was listed at around 3 million dollars).
I do miss the social aspect of it a lot though, and all the fantastic amenities. My horse had live most of her life in that area so she didn't really know any different and was quite happy.
I live in a town of 3000 people now and I had a really tough time finding somewhere to keep my horse even remotely close (within 50 km). I had to cold call a bunch of people and beg. I only managed to find one, and the only place to ride is a handful of country roads and the trail along the highway....I think smaller cities are the best place to have horses. There's enough people for good amenities, but land isn't quite at a premium.
 

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The answer is, you either have a lot of disposable income, or you don't do it, or if you try, you find that it is really quite complicated. I had a summer job in New York City while I was in university and found an affordable-ish barn on Staten Island, but turnout consisted of 45 minutes in the arena while the stall was mucked out. It took me about two hours to get from Manhattan to the yard because NYC traffic on the NJ Turnpike or the Belt Parkway (depending on which way I went) is horrid pretty much all the time, and there were, of course, tolls in the tunnels, if I went that way, and tolls on the Verrazano-Narrows or Bayonne Bridges. I only went on weekends, as the place where I worked overlooked the Brooklyn and Manhattan Bridges, and I remember watching the traffic build to a standstill every day and thinking, no way am I getting to Staten Island.

There was another barn in Brooklyn, near Prospect Park, and I considered moving her there as I could take the subway, but the stables were small and dark, no turnout (in Brooklyn? Really?), and, as the yard had no designated trailer parking, I imagined that finding a place to keep a horse trailer in Manhattan or Brooklyn would be interesting and character building, but not entirely in a positive way. Maybe I should have done it -- I don't know. There were also barns in New Jersey and in Riverdale with quite decent facilities, but they were upwards of $2000 per month.

I love New York, but I wouldn't live there and try to keep a horse again. London is similar in size, although not geography (it's not an island), so it will probably present similar problems.
 

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I live in a city and my horse lives 45 minutes away with no traffic. 90+ minutes in heavy traffic. It is a hassle, but I don't want to move out of the city and there's nowhere closer I want him to be, so it's not the end of the world.
 

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I think country folk would consider where I live to be "the city". On Long Island (New York) horse owners have to make a lot of sacrifices, with space is a huge issue.

I've found a lot of commercial barns have very limited turn out and are over crowed in my opinion. That means they measure turn out in hours and turn out size in feet. Commercial barns tend to be more expensive and will cost you about $800 a month for basic full board. If your looking at a show barn it's going to be in the thousands.

Then there is your backyard barns. They are easier on the budget, typically priced between $500-$700. Again, turnout tends to be limited more in size then in time.

To get a "country feel" you have to go all the way east, about an hour from me. Although it's just as expensive there is at least a little more room. It's certainly not practical though unless you move out there.

All and all, I love living in a place where there is things to do. I can hop on a train and by in NYC in 45 minutes, I've got a beach in every direction, movies, shopping... we have it all. And if we don't it's close by. My only complaint is it's not ideal for horse ownership.
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Wow. I'm sure glad I live where I do. My farm payment AND upkeep for 4 horses is about what you pay to board one. And you still have your housing on top of that.
 

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Wow. I'm sure glad I live where I do. My farm payment AND upkeep for 4 horses is about what you pay to board one. And you still have your housing on top of that.
Board at a commercial barn is slightly less then a studio apartment. :-| I wish I could say I was joking.

This one is $900 + $60 a month for turn out. Full Boarding Facility - Thomas School Day Camp and Long Island Ride School - Summer Day Camp & Riding School in Melville, NY

This one is $795 a month... and they nickel and dime you for everything, including feeding and cleaning your horses stall on holidays (That will be $10 extra every holiday)
Stanhope Stables


I really hope to move off the island in a few years. I would like to be about two hours away from Long Island so I can still day trip it down here. Who knows how realistic that is, but its worth a shot!
 

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Eight years ago, we got our first horses and lived in the city. We first boarded them just outside of town since they were the only one that didn't charge excessive for the wife's horse still being a stallion. After 3 weeks, we moved them to 30 miles out of town to where we wanted to go first.

We boarded our horses for about 6 years until we found the place we are at now. It wasn't terrible living in the city and boarding until we acquired more horses. The travel time was used to leave everyday hassles and headaches behind and actually enjoy the time with the horses. Only being able to see the horses on the weekends, we actually rode more than we do now. Having them on site and having to do their care, leaves less time, energy, and desire to ride.

We only have 6 acres and the dirt/gravel roads are where we ride. We can trailer to trails less than an hour away.

It just depends on what you have or are willing to deal with. Having your horse(s) boarded can leave you with less cash but more time. You can leave and not have to line up a horse sitter. Taking care of your own horses leaves you with less freedom of being able to take off on a whim for extended periods.
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I have 26 acres, payments at $230 a month, yearly taxes less than that. Monthly average for feeding 4 horses is $200. You people live in the wrong neighborhood.
 

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Imagine how congested it would get there if we all moved into Squirrelfood's neighborhood though!!!
 

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If something is important enough, you just figure out how to deal with the inconveniences. I grew up in the country and worked on a huge horse ranch before evolving into a city girl (who still wants her horses, lol.)

My boarding situation isn't perfect - it's a drive, I have limited availability to actually go to the barn, and there are amenities I wish I had - but it's safe and my horse is thriving. I just deal with the inconveniences because it DOES allow me to have a horse, and that makes my life feel complete.
 

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I'm surrounded by farm land but am still unable to find a barn with decent turnout. A lot of the barns have insufficient land for the number of horses they board so they limit turnout when it's wet out (9 months of the year ;-)) There are some places that pasture board, but every one of those I've looked into are places aren't places I'd want to keep my horse (poor quality care, no covered riding area, etc)

Right now my horse only gets 2-4 hours of turnout daily, and pastures aren't opened up yet (they will probably open them up in the next couple of weeks) I do think my horse suffers for lack of turnout, but it seems like I'm stuck until I get my own horse property one day...
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