The Horse Forum banner

1 - 20 of 210 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
999 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
It might be a good place to rant and talk about the horses and all the critters, better than making an individual topic for each thought/question. I don't know how often I'll keep this up, but I'll try. Someone spam me if I don't XD but anyhow, here's to start.

Today. Well actually let's back up to yesterday and review. A bit pic heavy...

Going outside on just a normal morning, then I hear little brother #3 yelling something about the cows. I go outside.

See it?


See it now?


You totally see it now.


We had no idea she was pregnant. After examining the other cows, one is really big (thought it was fat, possibly not) her business is droopy and stuff so maybe she's gonna calve too. Yay? He's a cute little bull calf though.



First surprise chicks, then surprise calf? Thank the Lord for life but geez.

In other news, nothing much is up with the horses except JayR finally busted his flymask. It was the cashel crusader with the nose (because he gets sunburned to the point of bloody blisters so it's a flymask and sunscreen for his face). Pretty good mask, just too big. Hated the stretchy strap with the velcro. Yick. The summer is almost over so I can tackle the rest of the season with sunscreen. Darn light skinned horses. Tess doesn't get sunburned ever, she's arab x appy with black skin. A little mottled pink around the muzzle (because of the appy in her) but that's it. It's JayR with the burns and allergies and everything. Poor old guy.

Still working with Red, the lame one. He might heal, he might not. He's better, but still limps. He's green broke but I saddled him the other day and walked him around. He pitched a little bitty fit about tightening the girth (ears back and stomping, he may or may not have been aiming for my toes) but was otherwise alright. Once he's better we can do more riding work on him, but as of now it's ground work and manners and the like.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,787 Posts
Crazy how a momma cow can hide those new babies, isn't it?

I... wouldn't recommend you get between mom and wee one there... or have dogs with you when you go feed in a few months when the weather turns in your area (I assume it does turn some where you live)

We had a surprise foal once. She's awesome. A turd to deal with and learning personal space and to not nip because she's in that obnoxious, pushy 18 month old stage now, but we love her.

Her momma's name was Nope.

Baby's name?

Oops.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Imperfectionsmith

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,787 Posts
I would add: One of our mommas had a calf this past spring... we called that little fart the Unicorn.

She kept it hidden for WEEKS, maybe close to EIGHT?

We'd see it every so often then POOF. GONE. We started to wonder if it was a mythical creature.

NEVER COULD find where she stashed it. :shrug:
 
  • Like
Reactions: KLJcowgirl

·
Registered
Joined
·
999 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Ha! Smart cow. And yes I'm staying away from momma. The calf got out under the fence yesterday and couldn't get back and momma was MAD. Had to be really careful getting the little guy back in. The dogs leave the cows alone and don't chase them, but truthfully I'm glad they're loose out there. The coyotes were going insane last night and the dogs would chase them off. Still we had to put Red up in the stall (they share the pasture with the cows) because he was curious and sniffing and licking Baby. Didn't hurt anything, but was freaking poor momma cow out a bit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,787 Posts
Good goggies then. Our ancient golden retriever used to really try to put a hurting on interloping coyotes. He never ever got close to one, but he'd run them right the heck off our place if he ever caught wind of one.

Have fun with that baby. Watching them kick up and play is the best.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
999 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Thanks Atoka, I will.

SO.

Have you ever woken up to find out the farrier is here and you forgot about it? Our farrier comes earlier in the morning (depending on his schedule, around 07:30 - 08:30) and we USUALLY have it written on the calendar. Well this time I forgot and was dragged out of my nice warm bed at the abominable hour of 8 AM to go catch horses. If I hadn't been up till almost 2 last night it wouldn't have been a problem.

Update on Tess's feet. Thin soles, and slightly weaker hoof wall. I knew this before, and am still trying to get a plan together about how to deal with it. I really want to ride her more and harder, but I don't much because of her feet. BUT. Today I found out that the cost of front shoes for her (plus the trim) is $85. We're already accustomed to paying $40 per horse for the trim, so it's only $45 more. I might be able to convince mother to split it with me, we shall see. But it's only $45 and now that I've got a bit more income it shouldn't be much of a problem. The farrier said that the front shoes plus a little turpentine and she should be good. I might supplement but Tess has access to minerals plus grass 24/7 so she is pretty balanced out in her diet. she doesn't have cracks in her feet unless it's right before a trim and they're a little rough, but overall she has pretty ok feet, heath wise.

Also, I bought a pair of boots. Yay! But, they're way too big (thought I was a 9, apparently not ugh). Anyway, I can't return them OR get a refund because I don't have the tag. :-x So I'm most likely going to have to put them on ebay and sell them. I need at least $100 for them because I need to buy another pair. New ones are at the cheapest $140 and most of the time a decent chunk more. Mine have only been worn one time and are clean and without scuffs. They still have the box and everything, but apparently that's not enough for the company to take them back. They're the women's Ariat Heritage Stockman and they are AMAZING boots. They're just too big. I'm really mad, I think I should call the company and complain or something. Stupid tag. Er, anyone on here want some boots? XD
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
999 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Today was ok. School as usual. I did have a bit of a panic attack over an assignment I was getting pressed on and didn't understand how to do, plus being stressed about work in general. Whatever, it wasn't that bad.

WELL. Another cow might be "with calf". She's bagging up and has discharge from her business and all, so we'll see. She might have it tonight, she might have it a few days from now. I'll walk out there one morning and there's a calf wobbling around. Anyhow.

Still trying to sell the boots. Ugh.

JayR is getting rub marks around his tail from itching. Working on that, it's probably mild sweet itch. I myself am dealing with an itchy problem, athletes foot. Ew. Tee tree oil and coconut oil seem to be working so far. We've used in on thrush for the horses before and it worked. JayR (the old man and usually the one with an issue or two) had a bad case and we had to clean out his feet, dry them, treat them, and try to keep poop out of them. He's now over it. What's funny is his has four white feet. And he's the one with the good feet! Thrush every so often and mainly in the summer but otherwise he has structurally sound feet. Tess has three dark feet and has the thin soles and weakish hoof wall. Though since I replenished the minerals, her hooves are obviously healthier. It's not grown out much since I've had the minerals out there, but you can still see a small difference.

Not much is happening. Horses, life, dogs, more life. It's slow for now. :cowboy:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
999 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Today was not really anything important.

Had a lesson with my "student" (mom's friend's 8 yo daughter who we're friends with). It was her birthday a week or so ago and since our (mine and hers) birthdays are only two days apart, I got her a present. It was a nice Troxel helmet of her own, so now she doesn't have to use my older beat up seen-better-days helmets. She gave me a bag of horse treats and a horse brush :loveshower: if more people got me horse tack and the like for my birthday I'd be in heaven.

The actual lesson went well, though she hadn't ridden for a month or more and was scared. She's not overly confident, but usually gets over it. She kept being afraid that the cows would chase her or something. That was silly, because they're all slow and fat and probably pregnant and don't give squat about the horses. And the one with the calf was nowhere near her. Then I was showing her how to ride with a crop in her hand and she got freaked out because JayR was tossing his head around and backing up. What it was is that when she was trotting the crop kept accidentally tapping JayR's rear (she was having a hard time not letting it do that) and he misunderstood the communication and thought it meant go faster. Student didn't think that was exciting at all and stopped him, but at the some time was waving the crop around. JayR just kept backing up and tossing his head. He wasn't spooked, just a little mixed up. Nothing bad happened except for Student getting spooked. After that we went back to the popper that ties to the saddle for the rest of the lesson. She's getting the hang of walk/trot/cantering in big circles and keeping the horse in line. Jay is great on his turns and since he's retired dressage, he shows off his moves. He'll do a pretty lead change then a slow, rocking canter with his head tucked down. He doesn't act like 22. I love that silly old man, even if he is grumpy sometimes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
999 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
So update.

Mama1 and calf1 are doing fine and the calf is hopping around and starting to play and goof off. Mama2 and calf2 are also healthy so far and that calf just pretty much sleeps all the time. In a while though he and his half brother will be running around and playing and maybe have a few more new friends. One cow is almost certainly bred just from observation, and maybe even the heifer is bred as well. All four were in with a young bull that apparently had figured stuff out before he was moved to a different pasture. So, fun. None of them were supposed to be bred but most likely they all are.


Here's something not cow related. It's about Tess, the local smart Alec. She might be my favorite horse ever. Next to JayR, of course.

She seems to take delight in pretending to not be interested in me or anything, when it's painfully obvious she is. I turn my back and she comes closer. I make eyes contact and she pretends I don't exist. Complete opposite from the doofus, Red, who is just a big, slightly dumb lover boy. Tess will sometimes let you come and pet her and sometimes even hug and scratch her withers. Other times she'll let you touch her shoulder then walks off. Ears not back but simply in that uninterested pose. Tess is a pretty little horse at around 15hh (probably a bit shorter) and with her little Arab head, but man she's a little turd sometimes. She's the type of horse that rarely honestly spooks at things and behaves when you ride her, but if you put someone who even seems inexperienced on her she decides the trash can might just have the boogey man inside it. Never does anything directly disobedient but totally plays dumb. "What? You're squeezing your legs, does that mean go? By the way does pulling on the reins mean stop? OMG THE DOG!"

Mares.


She's the best trail horse though. I wanted to do endurance with her, since Arab/app isn't a bad mix. I'd start training again if I had her in shoes, which I'll get hopefully. She's fast and can keep going fast for a long time. Once we did a decent race with the fastest Tennessee walker in our horsey community (who just so happens to be the fastest at sprints too. He's an endurance and a barrel horse) and even though she started behind (because she decided to crow hop and get excited) Tess caught up and was eating his tail by the end. She could have won if she hadn't of hopped around at the beginning.

I think I love this horse too much. I mean I would if that were actually possible. She can be a total MARE some days though if you know what I mean. Geldings make so much more sense sometimes. Except when the paint gelding who's 22 spooks at a plastic bag and Tess doesn't even flick her ear. Jay was a show (dressage) horse though and was pampered, so "roughing it" on a farm property is different than being boarded at a stables where everyone's English and the horses are clipped. Another reason Jay doesn't like people messing with his ears, probably got nipped the wrong way by some clippers one time. During winter Tess gets so fuzzy and her fetlock hair gets really long so that it touches the ground. Have to trim it before she starts looking like a clydesdale haha.

In other news, nothing. Not much more to talk about. Except that our dog who chases the horses sometimes tried it on the cow and got rammed with her horns. He was unhurt but she shoved him out of the way. Served him right. There should be a thread to share experiences about how your horses/other animals dealt with a dog that tried to chase them around.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
999 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Finally.

It's been a rough past couple days. Main reason is because our dachshund "Lizzie" we've had for 12 years was run over by a car. That was horrible and tragic and I'm mostly recovered, besides the obvious missing her.

That's the thing you learn when living on a farm or just with animals in general. Our beloved critters aren't immortal, nor do they live as long as us. They tend to be not as smart either and sometimes accidents happen. Point being, they die. It would have been a whole lot worse if she was our only dog, or only pet, or only other thing in our house besides the people. We do live on a mini farm though and have 3 horses, 7 cows, 3 cats, around 12 chickens, 5 dogs (it was 6 before and 2 are livestock dogs and are out in the field 24/7) and sometimes the occasional stray that hangs around until we find it a home. Having other dogs also means more to "fill the hole". Lizzie will be missed and forever remembered, but we don't have that "alone" feeling you have after losing something you care about. There's other dogs and things you still have to do, and the best thing to try and do is move on. I've gotten to where I don't feel horrible if a chicken dies or gets killed. It's sad and all but it's just a chicken and chickens die. I'm over that. If my horse or Mae Mae (Blaze) died I really think I might lock myself in my room and not come out for a week. I'm working on that. Mae is around 4 and healthy and both Red and Tess are about 8. JayR is 22. He's older. He might have another 10 years to go, you never know. Still, the thought of losing my horse or my dog upsets me. It'd upset anyone. Losing the family dog was traumatizing and pretty heartbreaking, but she wasn't my dog. I was really sad when an OTTB of my grandmother's died and climed to the top of a tree and stayed there for an hour. I was 12. The poor horse had foundered so bad they had to put him down. I missed him, but learned to not let it hurt you so bad. All in all it's just an animal. When my grandma's other horse, the first horse I ever really rode died, I don't think I cried, and if I did it wasn't much. It also wasn't tragic, she was 40 and just laid down and died. It's not as bad as the bone coming through the bottom of her hoof and having to be put down. Losing the animals you love hurts, but it's something we as animal people have to learn to almost get over.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
999 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
On Nate

I really think we've done everything we can to prepare. It's only going to be a cat 2. That can mean sustained winds up to 110 mph. We're not in the direct path, so luckily we won't get hit with the worst. All the horses are up, we've got water, we're pretty well set.

JayR is really the only one who seems nervous about the storm. In his stall he didn't settle down like the other horses. He had to sniff all around the stall, drink half his bucket of water, and just look on edge. Everyone else is fine. Except one of the cats who hates storms. He goes and hides when there's a thunderstorm or rain. He's a barn cat so he'll disappear for a whole day if it's storming.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
999 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
GUYS. WE HAVE A 4TH CALF! Out of my grandmother's cows who're living here at the time being BUT STILL.

And not just any calf, a little jet black heifer! (99.999% sure it's a girl anyway. Hard to tell when they're only a few hours old and the momma won't get out of the way) All the others are boys, and I've been praying the last cow had a girl! She did! It's such a pretty little thing! And better yet, my grandma pretty much said I could have her if I wanted! AH. I'm so excited!

!!!

Anyway, I'm naming her. Even if I don't keep her for some reason, I'm gonna give her a name. Her mom's and aunt's and grandmother's names are all related to flowers, so I feel I should do something like that. I kinda wanna call her Elanor because the golden flower of Lothlórien (and it's Samwise Gamgee's daughter's name). Because it's a flower and all, even if the cow is actually black hehe...but still, it's a Lord of the Rings reference. Then there's Rose/Rosie, Carrie (because Princess Leia and I like the name) or something else.

Suggestions on names? I should do a poll...I know it's just a cow but I still like naming things.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
999 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
After realizing I really, really need to manage my time better, I've gotten a good schedule together. Mainly because I'm going to start feeding old Jay twice per day, and that I need to work Tess. I'm getting up at about 7, going straight outside before breakfast, feeding the horse and working with Tess for an hour, then going back inside and going on with my day. I haven't been riding her as much as I should because of school and life in general. She's gotten a little barn sour and stubborn. She's not that bad, but still she just needs to be ridden. I lunged her with the saddle today, then rode her. I don't have a round pen, so I have to try to stick to an imaginary circle as best I can. She did pretty well, except when she got miffed about me making her trot and went too fast, breaking into a canter. She's not proficient on the lunge line, but she's at least familiar with the click that means go, whoa, walk, trot, canter, and change.

Then I rode her. She was a little bouncy at first and didn't want to do what I said, but eventually settled into doing what she was told. She did well. But, riding her realize that she isn't the only one out of shape. I'm sore. I'm usually not sore after riding her. We both worked hard, and we're both getting back into shape.

Random thing. She's got chippy hooves now. I've never seen them this bad. One side of her hoof is chipped so when she's standing on solid ground, you can see under her hoof. Not good. I have to go easy on riding her. She's not lame, not sore, but that's still not good. Why do some horses have to have hooves like that...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
999 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
Tess might be sore or just stubborn. She usually doesn't want to stop, now she doesn't want to go. Weird.

And I kind of feel like someone's been beating about the head and shoulders with a 2 x 4. Granted, it's literally not that bad, but I'm really sore. It doesn't help that I had to go remove a possum from the premises, and doing so required using the axe to knock out the rotten wood in the log it was hiding in. Possums are nasty.

Last note, it's unnerving when cows hide their calves. Little Ellie (is what I'm calling the calf if her owner gives the ok) was nowhere to be found this morning and that's how I found the possum, by tramping around in the trees looking for her. A little later I went out again and she was under the lean-to with her mom. Scared me bad, because she's so tiny (probably doesn't weigh 40lbs, she's a Dexter) and even coyotes could have gotten her. I ruled that out pretty quick after seeing that the dogs, cows, and horses were all calm and quiet and there were no signs of a fight. Still, if she had gotten out into the neighboring field that's surrounded by thick brushy woods, something could have got her and I not know. Her mom was calm and not hollering for her calf so in the end I had to assume the calf was just hidden somewhere. She was and she's fine, it just made me nervous.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
999 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
Here's little Ellie! She's so teeny! She's the black one, and the brown one in the first pic is one of the bull calves.





Wanted to make sure she was a girl (hard to tell bc I can't get the best look) so I managed to catch her today. She's a she! She's also a spunky little thing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
999 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
UPDATE:

not much. The cows are getting out through a hole they busted in the fence and we're in the process of getting another board for it. And it's been raining. It poured last night.

And I might make a thread for asking questions about Tess's color. It's weird. She's a reddish darkish brown with white hairs in there and some small white spots on her shoulders and butt (bc she's half appy). Then her mane and tail. It's black closer to the roots, then it gets blond at the tips. Almost like a silver bay, but she's not a bay. No black points at all. She almost looks like this

but again no black legs/ear tips and she has way less blond than this pic.

We say she's a sorrel, but her mane is just funny.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
999 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
Rant. I was going to make it a reply to a topic then it got off topic but I liked where it was going to kept writing.

It's a little disappointing, but horses aren't like dogs. 90% of them don't follow you around and come when they're called and all, not without knowing they can get something from it. Our horses are pretty average. One is a lover but won't really follow you around, and the other two are pretty much "meh". They'll let you walk up to them and you can easily catch the lovey gelding, but the other two can be a pain to catch sometimes. JayR is usually ok, just pretend to have feed or actually have some and don't rush him. If you rush him he'll run for the barn where you can catch him, but it means running all the way back to the barn for my two legs.

Tess, my only mare, is the hardest to catch. I've had her for a couple years now, and her attitude in general has improved since I got her (everything from tossing her head/not standing still when tied to being stubborn as a mule/cow kicking when cleaning her feet). She's not a huge lover. Sometimes she'll walk up to you and let you pet her, but most of the time she ignores (or pretends) to ignore you. Sometimes you'll go to get her without treats, not succeed, and stomp back to the barn to get cookies. She starts to follow you. You turn around to maybe catch her and lo, once she sees you're looking at her she ambles off like she doesn't even see you there. It's like she's passive aggressive to a small extent, she wants her way. She's gotten much better, but it takes time. If I keep her till her dying day she might get to the point where she comes over to me to "gimme kisses" (the one of a couple tricks she knows) voluntarily, but probably not. She's a mare. The thing is, horses aren't terribly affectionate to people. It can be helped and they can be friendly, but they'll probably not prance up to you and lick your face like in the cartoons. First off in a horse-human relationship comes the first element of trust. Trust as in letting you actually ride them, ect ect.

Next comes respect. You don't have to be "the BOSS" as in "you do what I say when I say or else", but a respected authority. Sometimes it depends on the horse. I'd say the majority of horses are stubborn critters. They don't need to be "whooped" but the need to be kept in line. Like, you wouldn't let your friend walk over a cliff and not correct them or at least warn them about it. I don't think we need to dominate horses, but if you're going to make an animal do something that it wasn't God-made to naturally do, someone will have to be the "teller". You can still be a team and be the superior. It's like a kid. If you let your kid run wild and do whatever they want, they won't really have respect for you. Kids have respect for someone who tells them who's who and prevents them from hurting themselves or someone else, even if they don't realize it till later. I've already come to my mom and said "Mom, than God you protected me and spanked me to keep me from doing the dumb crap that some kids do."

Now, your horse probably won't say that to you, but they'll give you respect if you keep them in line.

After respect, comes real trust. If a horse respects you and also mildly trusts that you're the brains up there, they'll be more apt to do things for you. Things like crossing muddy water is still probably going to be an issue (is it already was, it'll be better) because it's not an instinctual thing for a horse to want to do. Things like walking over a wooden obstacle bridge, under a curtain of flappy trash bags, or other little event obstacles, are going to improve immensely. You know 100% that it's safe, and the horse can tell. You have full confidence. It's different than going over muddy water, unless you get off and walk too you aren't totally sure there isn't a hole or a rock or something else that might be ouchy or scary. In both situations, though, a respectful horse will respect your authority and belief that whatever you're asking them to do is safe.

Next comes affection. Some horses show way less of this than others. Some will trot over and nuzzle you like an old friend, some will ignore you in the pasture. Even so, there's still a bond between horse and rider. Maybe not something so that a horse would fight a bear to the death to save you, but something that they'll let you pet them and ride them and not fuss about it too much. It depends on the horse.

Note: I think all these 3 (technically 4) things can almost be worked on and developed at once, and sometimes not in this order. Some horses are different. It really depends on the horse AND the rider.
 
1 - 20 of 210 Posts
Top