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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My horse's got shod all 4 yesterday morning. Neither behaved real good. My boy tried kicking farrier quite a few times. Other gelding leaned and was just a jerk.

They both spent most of day laying down. Are up this morning but still short of stride, not limping but not striding out like normal. Both were fine before being shod.

Had to get after my boy a lot ,he was in one of his moods. He doesn't want to do anything asked wasn't liking having feet done.

Is this normal after being shod??...after being barefoot since last fall. Last spring they were fine after being shod.
 

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We spent a few months with a bad farrier once and he did not trim my mare correctly. After getting her trimmed correctly she was very sore, to the point of me being unable to work her. Called the new farrier and he said it was totally normal for her to be sore because he did a lot of work. It may be possible that they are sore from the trimming instead of the shoeing.
 

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Is this normal after being shod??...after being barefoot since last fall. Last spring they were fine after being shod.
No, not to me it isn't.
My paint horse, well all my horses are barefoot, trimmed every 5 weeks cause they grow so much hoof.
When my horse was going to be in a competition where footing was questionable, he got front shoes.
{he's a wuss and ouch, ouch, ouchy with anything looking for excuses}
Farrier shod, trimmed and we went for a ride 20 minutes after farrier left.

To me, there should not be any detrimental change to their gait.
In fact, for me...when my horse got shoes he strided off with more confidence as he knew, felt not so much touching his hoof sole...
I've been told no horse should be "off" after a farrier works on them or something is up...call your farrier.
A ouchy horse after work done is a horse who you need to have re-looked at...a nail reset.
To close or a hot nail is cause and reason for a abscess to occur...make a phone call.


Now, I will give leeway for...
If there paddock is still frozen and snow/ice covered they would have cold hooves...
They could be reacting to the thump of the nails being placed in the shoe...but today that all should be gone.
A horse having shoes put on and then limping...make me worry he got a hot nail or a real close one if he isn't limping but "off" to your accustomed seeing him move.

As for behaviors unmannerly...
I don't tolerate that, period.
My horses know to lift a foot, not "sit" on my farrier and to behave.
I have "0" problem correcting their poor manners as it is happening with a word of warning to my farrier it is coming..
:runninghorse2:...
jmo...
 

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No Rambo, that is not right, especially if they're sore enough to want to lay down! Sounds like the farrier trimmed them too short or such(did he rasp/pare into sole? was it hot shod or cold?). Do NOT force them to work on sore feet. I'd actually request the farrier come back and remove the shoes, then give them a couple of weeks off & then see how they are.

After getting her trimmed correctly she was very sore, to the point of me being unable to work her. Called the new farrier and he said it was totally normal for her to be sore because he did a lot of work.
Heather, this is evidence that the farrier did NOT trim correctly!!! While she may have needed big changes in her feet, it is NOT appropriate to do too much/too fast and it is NOT appropriate, should not have been accepted that he made her sore!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
They were cold shod don't think either was trimmed to short. He didn't pare or rasp into soles. Took off extra hoof wall with nippers.

Horse's weren't real well behaved my boy is weird about having hinds messed with. He was very leery of farrier this time. They are used to me trimming their feet and I don't jack feet up like Farrier did, could of been part of issues with behavior.

I do make them mind there manners both pickup feet no issues. No ice in corral where horse's like to stand some ice where there is wasted hay build up. Should of put more info in first post..

Not forcing them to move or exercise wouldn't do that. Called farrier told him both horse's are sore from being shod. He will be out tomorrow to check them. Said possible he got some nails to close to sensitive part of hoof.

I know he had to pull a few nails and re nail. My boy was a bit kicky not liking being shod. As you know he's a work in progress. This Farrier is extremely patient with horse other farriers in past haven't been.

Losing tempers and getting rough with him. He's been hog tied in past to do feet...before I owned him.
 

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Only time I'd accept a horse being sore after shoeing was if you were experimenting with different wedges/frog support/ pads, ect. Then you'd pull the shoes and try something else.

If they are being bratty for the farrier because he holds their legs different, I'd bet you they are sore back there all the time. Doesn't have to be obvious, but when they are held flexed and in difficult positions, joints start hurting. They're bad because it hurts, the farrier gets rougher/takes longer, so it hurts more, then you have a sore horse the next day.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The being sore was same day they were shod. Farrier never got rough with them. Getting rough with my gelding gets you no where. Took farrier an hour an 10 mins to shoe both horse's.

He holds feet up higher but keeps them pretty close to under horse as possible. So no weird angles going on.

The black leaned he kinda does that anyway, he's a lazy pig about holding up feet.

He coming back tomorrow so hopefully it some close nails, easy enough to fix that. Feet have a little heat in them so it's definitely in feet. They have been laying down more then normal today also.

Off to check horse's then going to bed...Farrier will be here at 7am.
 

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They were cold shod don't think either was trimmed to short. He didn't pare or rasp into soles. Took off extra hoof wall with nippers.

Horse's weren't real well behaved my boy is weird about having hinds messed with. He was very leery of farrier this time. They are used to me trimming their feet and I don't jack feet up like Farrier did, could of been part of issues with behavior.
If cold shod, at least no chance of being cooked - I've seen a horse have to be put down because a farrier held a hot shoe to his trimmed foot too long & literally cooked the circumflex artery!!

So if they def weren't overtrimmed, I'd guess either 'low grade' laminitis or as farrier thought, he's 'quicked' them. Seems unusual that a farrier would quick both horses, but...

As to their behaviour, yes, if he 'jacked up' their feet too much, that may have caused a prob, along with your boy already being edgy & defensive because of prior treatment.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
^Then I'd think it is low grade lami.
Why do you say that? Interested to know you're thoughts on that. Farrier said nothing about laminitis or even the possibility of it.

We took a ride and both seemed sound even on pavement.
 

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Because otherwise inexplicable sensitivity(assuming, from what you've said) after trimming/shoeing, which resolves after a day or 2 is a common symptom. And knowing your horses did have hoof probs, which I don't imagine would be completely resolved yet.

I also just read that you feed lbs of oats once a day to your horses, and not providing balanced nutrition also make laminitis more likely.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 · (Edited)
Should of got a video of them when they were sore next time i will. His feet are much better then when i first posted about the pally. Black his feet were not kept up so are not as good. But he tends to be a lazy pig about not wanting to stand on his own feet and leans. I'm not strong enough to deal with that so he didn't get done pretty much all winter.

He now has a quarter crack on inside of front foot. As for feeding pally only eats once a day do to fact that's all he will do is once a day. He's not fat or cresty necked he's getting fit. He's standing good though much better than he was last fall when i posted about him,so must be heading in right direction foot wise with him. Will try and get hoof pic here.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
@loosie I'm aware that I'm not providing balanced nutrition. Hard to do when horse will not eat but one kind of feed. I've tried so not from lack of trying. For whatever reason he will eat oats fairly consistently.

Have Equilix tubs out it's a vit/min with no molasses In it no grains. So not a high sugar/starch lick. He licked on it for about 2 weeks now won't touch it. Other gelding still will lick on it some. Not sure its ideal but better than nothing.
 

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Picture of black geldings quarter crack think that showed up today after ride.

That really isn't what I would call a quarter crack. It's running parallel to the coronet band so it looks more like where an abscess blew out. Just my opinion of course. But what I think of as a quarter crack is running perpendicular to the ground, not parallel.
 

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@loosie I'm aware that I'm not providing balanced nutrition. Hard to do when horse will not eat but one kind of feed. I've tried so not from lack of trying. For whatever reason he will eat oats fairly consistently.
Yep, I did remember that. Gut upsets are a common cause of 'fussiness'. I think we've discussed that before too. I appreciate the difficulty, but I would not feed grain or other high NSC feed if I could only do it once a day. Esp if there's a fair chance the horse already has gut probs to begin with.

As to the pally not being 'cresty', IR/obesity is indeed about the most common cause of laminitis. But it is not at all the only one. Just because he's not overweight doesn't mean he can't suffer from it. Gut damage for eg is another common cause - which is why giving bute long term is also associated with laminitis, and why so many lean racehorses suffer from it.

And that crack is from an abscess blown in what look to be long heels, not a quarter crack. If your horse is difficult to do because he leans, hopefully it's as easy as training him to hold up his own body, by not giving him anything to lean on. However, it could be because he's sore somehow & needs to lean on something. That's where hoof stands come in really handy!
 

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That abscess crack happened at the hairline a while ago, has grown down that much. It would have become apparent today because of the excess pressure on heel walls with the ride today.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Palomino still on ulcer meds for both hindgut and stomach. I'll drop oats to 4 cups a day don't think that adds up to much pound wise. He's a tough one to feed and keep on a balanced diet. Just feel he needs something other then just hay, when being worked fairly hard.

He seems to lose energy when on just hay. The oats give him energy so he doesn't, fizzle out on rides. Maybe more time on ulcer meds will make the difference and his being fussy eater will change. Can only hope.


Yeah black needs chiro work have to call and get an appointment. Ok glad that crack is just an abscess blow out. His heels got long ,and that hoof wears real short on lateral side ,flares real bad on inside quarter. Just to be safe I'm keeping that crack cleaned out.
 
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