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Hi! I am only 14 years old and and trying to save up to board my horse at a place near me, because he currently lives in another state with my grandma. I am looking around for stables to work at and asking around at different places to see if they would lower the board cost in exchange for working at the stables. The place I want to board him at is $300 a month. Any other ideas on how i can make some more money?
thanks! :)
 

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Baby sitting is always a good first job. Pet sitting too. Mow lawns, rake leaves, stall cleaning are all good too, but can be hard work.
You could try making and selling jewelry, you just have to keep track of expenses and make sure you're actually making a profit.
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A lot of places require you to be 16, or even 18 to work there. I know around here you have to be 16 to work fast food.
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A lot of places require you to be 16, or even 18 to work there. I know around here you have to be 16 to work fast food.
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Yah where I live, you have to be around 16 to work at any fast food places.
 

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But the individual companies also get to decide what age limit they have. Most places ask on the application if your over 14/16/18, and online applications often won't let you proceed if you're under their age requirements.
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Is that for stall board? If not, then you may want to look around and see if any pasture board is available for cheaper. If you can't find a place that will exchange stall cleaning for board, then you probably need to look into getting a part time job at a fast food restaurant or something. Unfortunately, your options may be limited there. If you cannot find a job due to your age, then start doing what other folks have said and look for babysitting jobs, around the house type work for people, and such things. Start doing these things, and keep track of how much you make on average for several months. Even if it's not enough to cover board, start saving it so that once you do get a job and make enough to afford board you will have a safety net in case something happens to your income. Do this until you are old enough to get a "real" job, and then move you boy over :)

Also, try to see if your parents would be willing to give you cash to help out with boarding expenses instead of asking for presents at christmas and your birthday. This certainly wouldn't be able to cover you all the way, but it could help you catch a break once in awhile!
 

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Yeah, I don't know of any places who hire under 16 either, and they really prefer 18. I had a heck of a time getting a job at 16 because most places didn't like my age. I eventually found work with Cherrydale, and I collate (organize, staple, sort, and envelope fundraising material for public schools) for them. I don't get paid by the hour, I'm paid by the envelope. I get $0.10 per envelope, but I'm quite fast and can do about 6-7 envelopes per minute, so I'm paid enough to support my horses as long as I budget carefully. I also tutor, babysit special needs kids, and house/dog/horse sit for people to supplement my income. Maybe you can do one of those things?

My rule of thumb, is you need to be making enough money to pay for monthly board/farrier/feed costs, plus an extra $100 ideally, in case you need something. You should also put money away for emergencies. Again, ideally you'd have at least $300-400 for emergency. I can't say much though because at the moment I'm making just BARELY enough to board/feed/farrier my horses, and have little for emergencies in the bank. However, I'm also paying for my car insurance which is not cheap, and gas which is not cheap either. I wouldn't recommend it though...its stressful.
 
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Tangos Girl, what part of the country are you in? I made money at that age doing farm chores. I moved irrigation pipe in the summer, which at the time paid $5/turn, so I made $20/day. You can also sometimes also get paid to help at brandings and cattle round ups if you're willing to work. I have occasionally been paid to bring my horse and help bring cattle down off forest service leases too.

If you're not in a agricultural area, maybe you could baby sit? Mow lawns? I'm not sure what else. Maybe some people who grew up in a city may have better suggestions.
 
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Discussion Starter #14
Is that for stall board? If not, then you may want to look around and see if any pasture board is available for cheaper. If you can't find a place that will exchange stall cleaning for board, then you probably need to look into getting a part time job at a fast food restaurant or something. Unfortunately, your options may be limited there. If you cannot find a job due to your age, then start doing what other folks have said and look for babysitting jobs, around the house type work for people, and such things. Start doing these things, and keep track of how much you make on average for several months. Even if it's not enough to cover board, start saving it so that once you do get a job and make enough to afford board you will have a safety net in case something happens to your income. Do this until you are old enough to get a "real" job, and then move you boy over :)

Also, try to see if your parents would be willing to give you cash to help out with boarding expenses instead of asking for presents at christmas and your birthday. This certainly wouldn't be able to cover you all the way, but it could help you catch a break once in awhile!
It is $300 for a stall and they get turned out in the pasture at the daytime. The price also includes shots and fairer expenses.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Tangos Girl, what part of the country are you in? I made money at that age doing farm chores. I moved irrigation pipe in the summer, which at the time paid $5/turn, so I made $20/day. You can also sometimes also get paid to help at brandings and cattle round ups if you're willing to work. I have occasionally been paid to bring my horse and help bring cattle down off forest service leases too.

If you're not in a agricultural area, maybe you could baby sit? Mow lawns? I'm not sure what else. Maybe some people who grew up in a city may have better suggestions.
I am in Washington, so there isn't as many farms around the coast.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Is that for stall board? If not, then you may want to look around and see if any pasture board is available for cheaper. If you can't find a place that will exchange stall cleaning for board, then you probably need to look into getting a part time job at a fast food restaurant or something. Unfortunately, your options may be limited there. If you cannot find a job due to your age, then start doing what other folks have said and look for babysitting jobs, around the house type work for people, and such things. Start doing these things, and keep track of how much you make on average for several months. Even if it's not enough to cover board, start saving it so that once you do get a job and make enough to afford board you will have a safety net in case something happens to your income. Do this until you are old enough to get a "real" job, and then move you boy over :)

Also, try to see if your parents would be willing to give you cash to help out with boarding expenses instead of asking for presents at christmas and your birthday. This certainly wouldn't be able to cover you all the way, but it could help you catch a break once in awhile!
And I think that is a really good idea! Woking a little now and save up some money, and when i get a real job, bring him over, so i can continue to add to the money i have saved. Thanks for your help! :)
 

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Its a REALLY good idea to build a "financial cushion" of at least $1,000... or enough to euthanize you horse God forbid something happens to him. Board might cost you $300 a month, but that wont stop him from needing supplies, like fly spray, buckets or blankets. These costs will quickly add up. It might not be the wisest decision taking on a huge financial responsibility alone at your age.

And are you sure it includes vet and farrier? It doesn't sound right. Maybe they are saying you can use their vet and farrier? Two front shoes could easily run $100. Fall and spring shots could be about $250. I don't see why they would be covering your horses expenses.
 

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Its a REALLY good idea to build a "financial cushion" of at least $1,000... or enough to euthanize you horse God forbid something happens to him. Board might cost you $300 a month, but that wont stop him from needing supplies, like fly spray, buckets or blankets. These costs will quickly add up. It might not be the wisest decision taking on a huge financial responsibility alone at your age.

And are you sure it includes vet and farrier? It doesn't sound right. Maybe they are saying you can use their vet and farrier? Two front shoes could easily run $100. Fall and spring shots could be about $250. I don't see why they would be covering your horses expenses.
Both of the barns where I used to board covered both shots and worming for you. It is definitely done at some places, but usually not at places as low as $300. Both of those places were also owned and managed by ladies whose husbands were equine vets as well. Farrier expenses also vary by location and horse to horse. It's 90 for trim/front shoes with my farrier, but back where I used to live it was $70. They may cover the base cost of the trimming, and adding shoes is extra?

Either way, you are absolutely correct. You need to make sure you know WHAT is covered and what is not with your board so that you don't have unexpected costs that add up!

And I think that is a really good idea! Woking a little now and save up some money, and when i get a real job, bring him over, so i can continue to add to the money i have saved. Thanks for your help! :)
You're welcome! That definitely seems like the best option for you right now. Don't book a flight for you horse tomorrow- start saving up right now so that you'll have your safety net. A little bit of planning now can save you and your horse a lot of heartache later!
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Its a REALLY good idea to build a "financial cushion" of at least $1,000... or enough to euthanize you horse God forbid something happens to him. Board might cost you $300 a month, but that wont stop him from needing supplies, like fly spray, buckets or blankets. These costs will quickly add up. It might not be the wisest decision taking on a huge financial responsibility alone at your age.

And are you sure it includes vet and farrier? It doesn't sound right. Maybe they are saying you can use their vet and farrier? Two front shoes could easily run $100. Fall and spring shots could be about $250. I don't see why they would be covering your horses expenses.
My bad! It dose not cover fairer costs. This is what the monthly boarding price covers: (copy pasted form their website)


AM/PM water and feed (Owner supplied hay, no need to haul though i order once a month and it is great hay at a good price)
Daily turn out/in (blankets/masks/spray as needed)
Daily stall cleaning with soft white shavings
All day turn-out. Morning until dusk daily.
Your grain fed up to 2 times daily
your meds, shots, wormers given when needed
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Both of the barns where I used to board covered both shots and worming for you. It is definitely done at some places, but usually not at places as low as $300. Both of those places were also owned and managed by ladies whose husbands were equine vets as well. Farrier expenses also vary by location and horse to horse. It's 90 for trim/front shoes with my farrier, but back where I used to live it was $70. They may cover the base cost of the trimming, and adding shoes is extra?

Either way, you are absolutely correct. You need to make sure you know WHAT is covered and what is not with your board so that you don't have unexpected costs that add up!


You're welcome! That definitely seems like the best option for you right now. Don't book a flight for you horse tomorrow- start saving up right now so that you'll have your safety net. A little bit of planning now can save you and your horse a lot of heartache later!
My bad! It dose not cover fairer costs. This is what the monthly boarding price covers: (copy pasted form their website)


AM/PM water and feed (Owner supplied hay, no need to haul though I order once a month and it is great hay at a good price)
Daily turn out/in (blankets/masks/spray as needed)
Daily stall cleaning with soft white shavings
All day turn-out. Morning until dusk daily.
Your grain fed up to 2 times daily
Your meds, shots, wormers given when needed
 
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