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Please help! I’ve my cob gelding for almost 2 years and recently I’ve struggled to catch him in his field, and when I do manage to get him he ends up running off as he knows he stronger than me. I have tried to think of stressful things he may associate with coming in, but I just can’t see why he’s started misbehaving when it’s time to come in.
Most of the time he comes to me for treats, but as soon as he’s eaten them he’s off again. He behaves well when tied up and riding.I don’t know what to do and I am willing to try anything to make him behave and listen to me. I would love it if he would come to me when called, so any advice is appreciated although I know this is a long way off yet. Thank you in advance!!
 

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Hi, so I'm guessing he's always been good till recently? And nothing obvious has changed? Therefore I'd guess it may be that he's maybe hurting somehow.

As an aside, while luring/bribing horses with treats is indeed helpful to get a behaviour in the first place, it quickly becomes problematic if you keep it up - eg. horse will 'grab & run', or figure out just how little he can do for the most treats, etc. So if you're going to keep using treats - or whatever reward - ensure it IS a reward/positive reinforcement for the behaviour you want, rather than a bribe to offer before you get the behaviour.
 

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there must be something out there that he'd rather be with . His buddies?

If so, bring out a treat and give it only to the buddies. don't give him any treat at all until the halter is on.
If it's a real problem, then look into posts here on 'walking down a horse'

How big is the pasture he is in? with how many other horses?
 

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I agree with @tinyliny. Has this started happening all the sudden? If so, I'd try to figure out what had happened. Does he have a new buddy? Is there a mare out there and maybe she's just come into heat?
 

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Don't give him any treats until he's securely caught.

If he pulls away from you in a regular headcollar then try something like the Be Nice halter to lead him in.

If he's in a field with lots of spring grass coming through and too much room for you to spend time walking him down, consider confining him to a much smaller area.

Try to avoid getting into a situation where you only bring him up to the yard when you ride him, always have a small feed waiting for him in his stable or on the yard so he has something to focus on other than being ridden
 

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Don't use treats. Your horse needs to be able to be caught without treats. This was my mare a year ago. She would run away from me every time she saw me, I would feed her a treat and she would run away from me right after she took the treat, and I couldn't even catch her. So what I did was, we taught her that if she doesn't want to get caught she would have to work. We put her in a round pen with a halter (no lead rope) on and grab a lunge whip. Next, we went in there with her and would try to come up to her and grab her halter. If she would run away, we would wave that whip and MAKE her run. Eventually she would stop or we would stop her and try again. If she'd let us grab her halter, we'd praise her and walk with her a little and then let go and walk away and try to come up to her again in thirty seconds. If she didn't let us catch her, then we'd make her run again. Then we would do it all over again until she realized that if she doesn't want to get caught then she has to work. Another thing that I did was after I let her go in the pasture, I would stay with her for a while and just love on her. I also would go out sometimes and not catch her, but just stand there with her and love on her. Eventually she stopped associating me with work but would start to come up to me herself. And someone on here said to put him in a smaller pasture. No, cramming them into tiny spaces just because you can't catch the horse is not the answer.
 

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I only give the treat once we are out of the turnout and after I close the gate. I started doing it when bringing my mare in when she was asking to come in (she’s a diva, doesn’t like heat, rain, wind, flies...). So she knows she’s not getting anything until we are out - I even leave the treat next to the gate so she can’t even pester me for it. She knows not to pester for treats but I always try to minimize potential for conflict.
 

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Your horse is used to getting a treat, so after you halter him, give a small treat. Lead him out of the turn out area, give him the second small treat. After you have no issues with catching him then reduce the treat to when you are outside the turn out area. He will learn halter and out of the pasture means I get a treat. No treats unless this is done. Halter him and brush him. Scratch his itchy good spots.
 

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The idea of delaying the treat is a good one, but I think you should go back to the drawing board and do some training. Spend some time with your horse without riding or working him. Halter him and take him out to graze some nice, green grass! Take him for a hand walk around the property, on trails, do something fun. Just go and hang out. This will require a time investment. But he needs to stop associating you and the halter with unpleasant things. Sure, you can give treats, but I'd like to suggest that you can get beyond that and make the "treat" a fun activity for your horse. It might just redefine your relationship for the better too.
 

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Please help! I’ve my cob gelding for almost 2 years and recently I’ve struggled to catch him in his field, and when I do manage to get him he ends up running off as he knows he stronger than me. I have tried to think of stressful things he may associate with coming in, but I just can’t see why he’s started misbehaving when it’s time to come in.
Most of the time he comes to me for treats, but as soon as he’s eaten them he’s off again. He behaves well when tied up and riding.I don’t know what to do and I am willing to try anything to make him behave and listen to me. I would love it if he would come to me when called, so any advice is appreciated although I know this is a long way off yet. Thank you in advance!!
 

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Well I do know if you chase or run after him they will think you are the predator so don’t chase him an be patient and talk to him . And if you do bribe him make sue you always got your lead rope in hand and rub on him and make him feel familiar to you don’t get upset with him bc he can since you tension and he will never let you get next to him
 

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But he needs to stop associating you and the halter with unpleasant things. Sure, you can give treats, but I'd like to suggest that you can get beyond that and make the "treat" a fun activity for your horse. It might just redefine your relationship for the better too.
Ezacly! Nothing wrong with using food treats, even bribery, IMO, when used right. Like any 'tool', it can be used well or badly. But as a 'means to an end' it helps associate you/what you're asking with good stuff/good feelings. It's not the be-all and if you can teach the horse that what you're asking is fun, it can be self reinforcing, without needing extra rewards for the horse to be keen.
 

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Don't use treats. Your horse needs to be able to be caught without treats. This was my mare a year ago. She would run away from me every time she saw me, I would feed her a treat and she would run away from me right after she took the treat, and I couldn't even catch her. So what I did was, we taught her that if she doesn't want to get caught she would have to work. We put her in a round pen with a halter (no lead rope) on and grab a lunge whip. Next, we went in there with her and would try to come up to her and grab her halter. If she would run away, we would wave that whip and MAKE her run. Eventually she would stop or we would stop her and try again. If she'd let us grab her halter, we'd praise her and walk with her a little and then let go and walk away and try to come up to her again in thirty seconds. If she didn't let us catch her, then we'd make her run again. Then we would do it all over again until she realized that if she doesn't want to get caught then she has to work. Another thing that I did was after I let her go in the pasture, I would stay with her for a while and just love on her. I also would go out sometimes and not catch her, but just stand there with her and love on her. Eventually she stopped associating me with work but would start to come up to me herself. And someone on here said to put him in a smaller pasture. No, cramming them into tiny spaces just because you can't catch the horse is not the answer.
I believe the suggestion of putting horse into a smaller space was for the training of 'walking down' to be caught. It's like you put your horse into a very small space; a round pen. For the approximately the same reason. but walking down the horse isn't so much about making the horse run if they won;t be caught.

There are two approaches. One is that you walk toward the horse, if it runs off, you just continue to walk along up to it and just keep walking along behind it, until it stops. and as soon as it does, you stop walking and wait, .. you keep this up walking when it walks and stopping when it stops. Eventually the horse will turn and look at you. You can the take abstep backward a bit and invite it in. if it walks off, start the walking follow. Eventually , it gets tired of you following and goes back to join up with you.

I do it a bit different, tho. I approach horse normally No sneaking. I do not hide the halter, either. If the horse allows me to walk up close, but then turns and darts off, when it has fully turned away from me and 'left' me, I put pressure on it. I make some noise, smack the ground with the lead rope, or smack my thigh, or kick some sand sideways (not AT the horse, just make a general commotion that is unpleasant to the horse. this is as much to say, "that choice is not the right one". Yes, It will make the horse run, but it will also make him look back toward the source of the noise. It will bring YOU into his attention When he looks back at you, you are very quiet, and pause. you become passive. If he looks away but doesn't walk off, you make a very small noise or motion, just enough to draw his thought backc to you. If he looks as you, then decides again that he will not come but would rather leave, you make the commotion AFTER he has completely turned away and taken a couple of steps off. If he gets far enough away that he thinks he can start grazing, then you must interrupt that briskly, like maybe running toward him or making a louder noise. you do no allow him to enjoy the time or distance that he has put between you. You don't run him around, but you don't let him graze or visit with other horses. You keep interrupting that and offereing him the chance to come back toward you
 
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