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My horse is realy lazy sometimes and it gets realy frustrateing, is there anything i can you or and exerzises i can xo to stop his from being so lazy. I use my legs Lot and i use the crop on him ( not to much so i dont hurt him) I will try all sujestions. I have a one day comp in 4-5 weeks so he needs energy to do everything so its important.

Thanks to everyone that read and commented :)
 

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I tend to like a horse with more whoa than go! That being said, the horse still must listen and respond to all cues in a timely fashion. The best advice I can give you is to be extremely consistent with your cues. When asking for a trot, I start with a kiss, if the kiss is ignored then I squeeze with my legs. If the squeeze is ignored, I spank the hip with a rein. If the horse still hasn't changed gait, the spanking continues in a rythmic fashion until the horse trots. If you are diligent with this set of cues, the horse will know you mean business and will soon move off with just a kiss.

The key is using the same progression of cues until the horse gives you the response you are looking for. Once in the trot, you must be in tune to the horse's body language. If you you feel the horse trying to slow down and move back to a walk before you ask for that transition, don't let him. Keep him going until you decide to walk.

If you give up with your cues before you get the response you are looking for you will only teach your horse to ignore your cues. So, have a plan the next time you work with your horse and stay consistent with your cues.
 

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Agreed with Sahara. Start your cues as light as you would prefer the horse to respond to, and escalate until you get the desired response.

For an upward transition, think forward (making sure that you aren't blocking her with the reins), close your legs, squeeze, cluck/kiss, and then spank with rhythm until you get the transition. When the horse responds, let your aids go neutral. Be very consistent and clear in the application and the release of the aids - the horse learns from the release, not the pressure.

For a downward transition, think about slowing down (exhale, slow your seat, close your legs and "melt" into the tack), and back up the seat/leg aids with a verbal "whoa" and a closing of the hand (no pulling, just closing the front door).

Horses typically aren't truly lazy - they can be very dull to the aids, and it takes consistent clarity to build or restore that "Yes'm/Yessir" response. It may take more than 4-5 weeks, depending on the horse. Don't rush his progress for the sake of an event - take the time it takes and build a good foundation, and you'll have a better partner faster for it.

Good luck!!
 

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tried doing halt to canter transitions? done in the same way people have mentioned, just delay your release untill the horse is cantering. great for sensitivity and building "go". be careful not to overdo that though.
 
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