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^I hear you and agree. I was surprised the first time I saw one--I've only ever trailered my horses in large (several horse) slant loads, or by professional haulers where they had a box stall.
 

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My trainer has a stock trailer and I love it! My horse seems to love it also. Any time we load up to ride, the horses are tacked up. They always get a good dousing of fly spray and get their fly masks to help keep out any debris. I notice when it rains, the trailer stays completely dry inside, so I don't think a lot of debris flys back their anyway.
 

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When I started grooming for polo practices I discovered there is some down time. Games go at a furious pace. I'd try to park so the horses could be tied on a shaded side. It's frequently in the upper 90s and low 100s here in the afternoon.

I found that if I went into the trailer, the contrast of shade vs sun outside caused its' own little breeze.

Once got stuck at road construction gone wrong in western ND with a load of horses on a super hot day. What to do? Unload on a two lane highway with no help and 8 horses? I stepped into the trailer and found the same breeze. The horses were fine. Even those in between others. A few of the more energetic ones stomped and pawed a bit.

When moving there doesn't seen to be much risk of debris flying into a trailer. Or we'd all have side windows cracked like windshields get and they would make side windows from the same material as windshields.
 

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About the only types of trailers seen here now are stock and slants loads. Even the 2 horse straight loads are as scarce as hen's teeth. I've owned a 3 horse slant trailer for years and found that by opening the roof vents, all the windows on each side and the window in the back door, there is good air flow even when we're stopped in traffic. The windows on the horses' head side have bars separate from the drop down windows so they can't stick their heads out. This trailer has oversized stalls since we had a Belgian gelding, stud dividers, and heavy grooved floor mats so the horses don't slip. I don't haul the horses saddled simply because during riding season our saddles are stored in the tack compartments so we just tack up when we arrived at our destination.
 

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I finally got my own trailer and it is a 3-horse slant load. My horse is hauled naked (or with a sheet on)....and often has shipping boots on since he's famous for knocking his legs a bit.
I have hauled my horses loose in the trailer, or tied up in a stock trailer and no one got hurt. I don't haul with my saddle already on.....although if I start doing more trail riding that might be something I try.
Out here you see a lot of outfitters, etc hauling horses with their saddles on. Most of the trailers here are stock trailers/enclosed trailers. Don't see people hauling their horses in the back of trucks (in fact, I'd never seen that until I was camping in BC and saw a fellow hauling his donkey like that). Had a good chuckle since it's just not done in AB.
 

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@jenkat86 -- Do you find that your horses are easier to load? I feel like a stock trailer is a little less daunting than a typical 'horse' one.
 

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@jenkat86 -- Do you find that your horses are easier to load? I feel like a stock trailer is a little less daunting than a typical 'horse' one.
I've never had a problem loading any of mine. Fortunately they were well trained in trailer loading before they came to me. BUT I do find my mare to be more content when riding in a stock-type trailer and what I mean by that is that she is quiet. If she's loaded in a slant, or straight load with dividers, she paws every now and then and you can also feel her moving around a lot more. I think she prefers to find her own "spot."

When my trainer gets horses in that don't load well, he always starts them out with that open stock trailer and yes, they seem to load much easier with it vs. a smaller more enclosed trailer.
 

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I have an old, ugly 2 horse straight load. Its got a new floor, New frame, and a fan running off a battery in there, but it still gets pretty hot. I avoid stopping anywhere for more than a few minutes during the day because of it. But I always haul them naked and just tack up when I get to where I'm going.

I believe my horses would load better into a stock trailer, but the only one that really ever gives me trouble is my mare. And usually a smack on the butt fixes it.
 

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I've hauled horses in all kinds of contraptions and the only problem I've had was hauling in a horse trailer. My horses hate it yet they'll load in any kind of stock trailer, brush beater open tops, etc., a truck with racks or a stock truck..lol. The racks on trucks are popular here with the sheep herders and camp guys. I think they're cool..literally.

I almost always haul saddled too. The only time I've had a saddle slightly damaged is when a colt left teeth marks on my cantle. But other than that use a little common sense, it's not an issue.

My personal rig, the same one I haul to shows and to work, a stock trailer.
 

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I would only trailer with the saddle on if we were going to a local trail, and if the saddle was already fairly beat up. Otherwise, no, never. Aside from that they get their sheepskin shipping halters/head bumper.
 

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I almost always haul saddled too. The only time I've had a saddle slightly damaged is when a colt left teeth marks on my cantle. But other than that use a little common sense, it's not an issue.
Yes...my horse has been promoted to riding in the front because the last time she was in the back she tried to make a nice snack out of her neighbor's pulling collar strap... :oops:
 

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Hahaha, all our tack is working tack so we don't worry too much about a few scrapes here and there....but our horses quickly learn to behave in the trailer because they associate that as the only place they get to rest. Where we have our cattle, they are scattered out over about 10-12 miles; 30 in a pasture here, 20 there, and 15 over there. On a day where I park the truck and ride to check them all is a 25-30 mile day. If I don't do that, then we load/unload 8-10 times in a day. The horses learn fast that the trailer is the place to be if they want to relax and catch their breath LOL. If I'm on a young horse, everywhere I go is at a long trot or a lope so even if they are squirrely about loading that morning, they are more than happy to hop in by the end of the day.

The only time I've had tack damaged beyond what I could repair myself was my own fault. I thought my big horse would fit in the trailer with a saddle on because he had the year before. Turns out, he had grown a bit and when I put him in, I ended up getting the horn cap ripped off my saddle and had to have the horn re-leathered. I was so ticked at my stupidity, but I dang sure learned my lesson, hence the improvised saddle racks in my second above photo LOL.
 

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I have hauled horses to and between pastures saddled.

The best use of hauling saddled was when I was picking one up that had a reputation for being unreasonable when going to a new place. Just had to strut and let everyone there know he was the greatest.

I hauled him saddled, wondering if he would associate that with "My work is not done." Unloaded him, hopped on, and rode him for several hours. He was ready to stop when I let him, and there was none of the "Look at me! I dare you!" nonsense his owners had with him. Oh, he became the boss horse, but with a lot less drama and no one got hurt or run.
 

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I have hauled my horses tacked up before, but don't do it as a practice. Usually going to a branding where I have to meet my ride about a 1/2 mile from my house. So I tack up and we walk down (I'm not riding since I have to carry my cooler, etc., LOL) to the meeting point. Sometimes we have done so coming home, although I get dropped off at home then. I see the working cowboys in my area hauling their horses tacked up all the time. It's not a big deal around here.

I've seen many wonky trailers on the road, too, LOL. Some are so scary to me that I wouldn't put goat in them, but if the horses are used to hauling in them, that's also not a biggie. There is always a chance for accident/injury, even with a "safe" trailer.

FWIW, I haul in a 2H slant (2005 Trails West Adventure MX - LOVE my trailer!). I usually am only hauling one horse so keep the divider open in that instance; but it hauls both nicely.
 

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In between pastures I haul saddled

I haul in a stock/horse trailer. Its kind of a both. For years I hauled in a draft horse sized 2 horse enclosed trailer.

We see horses being hauled in all sorts of stuff around here. From super expensive fancy stuff to eye sore but it will get the job done.

I have hauled in stock racks on a pickup and will be doing so again. We backpack and use a small pony or 2 to carry food and tents for us. Stock rack will be easier than dragging a 16 foot trailer into some areas we go.
 

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I had a stock trailer and hauled saddled up if I was going to lessons or a trail ride, I didn't have any tack storage in that trailer. I felt bad about leaving my horse in the trailer on a hot, hot day in the middle of parking lot for an hour, but he wasn't tacked up, he was coming home from the trainer's and something was going on the truck, hubby stopped at a parts shop and was repairing it, took about an hour. Felt sorry for the old man too, he was sweating as well. I, on the other hand, walked over to the strip mall and sat in an A/C soda shop. No need for all of us to suffer.
 
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