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I finally found a new stable to ride at. It's absolutely gorgeous, and at least ten times as better as my old one. Its very organized, and we are actually allowed to tack up our horses ;)
So, we tour the stable and decide that I'm going for a 5-week "session" of lessons. (One lesson a week for 5 weeks, then you decide if you want to continue or leave). It costs 175$ plus taxes, which is about 200$ in total. That's about 35 dollars a lesson, and I'm riding with one other girl. My problem is paying for it.
Since its WAY to hot for a paper route, I hate baby sitting and I'm too young to get a job...
I have to do chores. Lots and lots of cleaning.
Our system is that I get "paid" money for doing a simple thing like sweeping or dishes. Only I don't actually get money, its put in a metaphorical bank and my mother pays for the lessons for me... which I earned sweeping my rear off.
Do you guys think this is a good way for a 13-year-old to pay for her riding lessons? How do your kids get the money to pay for theirs? Let me know!

Just saying, this would be fantastic.
 

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That sounds like a fantastic system. When I was younger and taking lessons, I did barn chores at the stable to help lower the cost, I saved up birthday money and pet sat for neighbors, and did chores around the house.
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That's an excellent way for you to earn your lesson money. I did chores, cleaning, cooking, laundry, yard work and got paid so much per chore. Once I learned to ride, I worked at the barn and exercised and helped break horses to help pay for lessons and board.
 

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I did very similar to what dreamcatcher did. I saved up my money to buy my first few sets of lessons and then I started working at the barn and became a show groom aftera few years. I worked there long enough to be an under the table employee (around 13 years old) and we would ride whenever we wanted outside of lesson times. It was an amazing experience! I learned more about horse ownership and care than most of the boarders there knew!
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My daughter does much the same. We trade our BO for many of her (and my) lessons but it all goes into an account which is then divyed out. Good way to do it IMO. Good luck and have fun.
Cheers.
Les
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I finally found a new stable to ride at. It's absolutely gorgeous, and at least ten times as better as my old one. Its very organized, and we are actually allowed to tack up our horses ;)
So, we tour the stable and decide that I'm going for a 5-week "session" of lessons. (One lesson a week for 5 weeks, then you decide if you want to continue or leave). It costs 175$ plus taxes, which is about 200$ in total. That's about 35 dollars a lesson, and I'm riding with one other girl. My problem is paying for it.
Since its WAY to hot for a paper route, I hate baby sitting and I'm too young to get a job...
I have to do chores. Lots and lots of cleaning.
Our system is that I get "paid" money for doing a simple thing like sweeping or dishes. Only I don't actually get money, its put in a metaphorical bank and my mother pays for the lessons for me... which I earned sweeping my rear off.
Do you guys think this is a good way for a 13-year-old to pay for her riding lessons? How do your kids get the money to pay for theirs? Let me know!

Just saying, this would be fantastic.
There is good or bad way, as long as you are willing to work for your lessons, then it's the right thing to do. Keep in mind sometimes working for saving which goes into lessons, might not always be easy work or something you like to do.

You have to sacrifice some things to get another.
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I'm the kind of person who will do anything for a dollar. I have two jobs and MANY side jobs house/animal/babysitting. Since lessons are an "extra" expense I use my "extra" side jobs to pay for them. If I don't babysit that week I skip my lesson.

Years ago I used to work for my lessons. I don't remember how many days it was but I got two lessons a week, which I frequently got screwed out of because there wasn't enough time in the week. I definitely gave up both Saturday and Sunday plus several weekday afternoons.
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If that's the arrangment you have worked out with your parents, then I think that is perfectly acceptable to "exchange" your chores around the house for riding lessons.

I "exchanged" 18 years of farm labor for a car when I was in college. Worked out well. Can't say I enjoyed picking rocks, getting kicked by calves, sweeping grain bins, etc etc .... but my shiny new car looked great!
 

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My child does work on our farm, helps get the lesson horses ready and raises chickens and sells the eggs. He's 9. I pay for the balance if he does everything without complaint.
 

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I had it a bit easier... my parents said I could have riding lessons instead of an allowance. It made me very good at saving whatever money I got from gifts.
 

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What I did was do barn chores in the stable in exchange for lessons. That's also how I payed for my first lease horse!

Good luck! :)
 

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When I was 13 I saved all my birthday/Christmas money during the year so I could afford to pay approximately 12 lessons that i took in the summer. Eventually when I was 14- 15, I was lucky enough to get a job at my local children's library. Twice a week I went for an hour and put books away. Was still only enough to pay for lessons in the summer (until I eventually got other odd jobs), so I think the deal you have with your parents is excellent. Your lessons probably cost more than what your job in chores are worth, unless of course they make you work extra extra hard and give you every imaginable task. ;)
 

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I didn't start riding until I was 12 but as soon as the opportunity came my parents who watched me draw pictures of horse and rider jumping over things signed me up and I started working at the barn for my lessons. It was great! And I continued to do that through my teenage years. Hauling hay bales and wheelbarrows of manure in the middle of summer really teaches good work ethic ;)
Now that I'm older I work two money-paying jobs. My weekly tips from my coffee shop job and any cash I get from side jobs like petsitting, I get as long as I am ahead or at least on time on paying my other bills, goes into riding :)
 
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