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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi I just got a horse and he has a clubbed hoof. I was wondering how this affects horses?
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Makes them lame, including into back and hind legs. Makes them uncomfortable, and when it is bad, can lead to them having to be PTS as nothing else can be done.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Depends on how severe the club foot is, if it is minor then he should be able to a lot of things, the more severe it is , the more limited he will be.
I got told it was bad but not really bad the old owner didn't say much and the farrier wasn't much help either. I don't want to do stuff that might hurt him or won't be good for him.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Makes them lame, including into back and hind legs. Makes them uncomfortable, and when it is bad, can lead to them having to be PTS as nothing else can be done.
It is on his front right leg he won't be doing any jumping. It's just walk trot and canter would he be ok with doing this? Also what is PTS?
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Post a picture. Or at least rate it 1-5, 1 being barely noticeable. It does really depend on the individual horse . Many do very well, but it depends on what you want to do with him. What has he done in the past?
 

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Please post a picture. It is uncommon for a club foot to be unmanageable, constantly lame, or cause a horse to be PTS.
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Pts = put to sleep
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Club feet are often the result of tension of the Deep Digital Flexor Tendon (DDFT) that runs down the back of the limb and attaches to the coffin bone. They can be the result of genetics or habitual stances (always nursing with the same foot forward, etc). If caught early, when still a foal, there are things that a vet and farrier can do to minimize the "clubbiness" foot (check ligament desmotomy with tip shoes, etc).

If your horse is not a foal, the best thing you can do for it is to maintain regular, professional farrier care. By helping your horse to get a heel first landing on all four corners (or close as you can, a severely clubbed foot sometimes cannot), you can offer relief to the DDFT. Since tendons are not elastic, it is important that your horse is trimmed and/or shod to offer the best base of support at the back of the foot to help eliminate tendon tension that could result in lameness. With proper and consistent care by a capable farrier, I have seen many clubbed footed horses live relatively pain-free, and athletic lives.
 

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i have a 7 year old mare with a grade 1 club. it has never once caused her to be lame, have pain, affect her walk/stance or athletic ability in any way.
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Post a picture. Or at least rate it 1-5, 1 being barely noticeable. It does really depend on the individual horse . Many do very well, but it depends on what you want to do with him. What has he done in the past?
Ok I will take a photo later on today
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Post a picture. Or at least rate it 1-5, 1 being barely noticeable. It does really depend on the individual horse . Many do very well, but it depends on what you want to do with him. What has he done in the past?
Here is a photo of his clubbed hoof. His old owner told us she would mainly ride him along the beach but then she had a stroke so he was left in a paddock for 8 months
 

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he looks to have a tad of arthritis in the pastern/ ringbone or such.
If you are not doing fast stops, turns etc on him he should be okay.
If he starts gettin sore or lame , then you will know it is to much.
 

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Afraid that pic is completely pointless sorry. What we need to see mostly is the heel angle/height, etc, as that's what we're discussing. ;-) You also need to get the horse standing on a hard, flat surface, not with grass/soft ground obscuring the hoof. Also from ground level & squarely. Check out the link in my signature for what is required for critique pics.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Afraid that pic is completely pointless sorry. What we need to see mostly is the heel angle/height, etc, as that's what we're discussing. ;-) You also need to get the horse standing on a hard, flat surface, not with grass/soft ground obscuring the hoof. Also from ground level & squarely. Check out the link in my signature for what is required for critique pics.
Ok it is a bit hard finding him something other then grass to stand on but next time I'm near something I will take a photo again :)
 
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