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Discussion Starter #1
Until they have to be put down?
So yesterday i noticed a boarders horse choking and i know that sometimes this can be resolved on its own he had wads of green/brown coming out his nose and mouth. Something didn't feel right so i called the vet - which was over a hour away. And he was still choking when she got here. He got tubed numerous times till he was bleeding out his nose.

But what was happening is he wouldnt swallow the tube so it just kept coming back out his mouth? She tried numerous times and then had him on IV fluids for a few hours since his gums are white , This horse is 27 years old what are the odds of him coming out of it? He hasnt ate since 3pm yesterday , its morning now and he is still choking and gagging my normal vet will be out in about a hour , my other worries are can not eating for so long cause colic or if the impactation passes badly or doesnt at all?
 

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I would be calling the boarder and asking what they wanted done. It sounds like maybe the choke is so impacted in there that the tube couldn't pass. If that's the case then it may take surgery to break it up and remove it and some time with a trach, none of that would end up being inexpensive. Or at 27, the owner might decide to let him go. I would NOT be letting one of mine stand around choking, and at his age would probably opt to let him go.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Boarder has already been here and making decisions. Her plan is to not put him through surgery. :(
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Oh i dont either. Given his condition and age. Its just sad that if he ends up going its from something as simple as eating hay. At least he has his dignity.
 

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It probably wouldn't be colic that would prove fatal. Instead, there is a good possibility that the horse could aspirate food into the lungs and develop a bad pneumonia, or else if the blockage is in place too long it will restrict circulation to that area of the esophagus and cause tissue death or permanent scarring.

I would be very unhappy with a vet leaving a horse with choke. I understand waiting a short amount of time to see if the blockage will pass, but after that a decision has to be made. The vet could recommend trailering the horse to a hospital where an endoscope could be used. The IV fluids were a good idea, but pain medication and other drugs that can help release the spasm are also important. Worst case, the horse needs surgery or else euthanasia.

Edit: Just saw the last posts. It sounds like a good decision for the horse.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Endoscope , sedation and antibiotics and pain medication were all already used
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Hes gone now , this has been a really sad day for me since ive known this horse since I was born.
Vet did try to tube him a few more times and said he was blocked from his neck to his stomach and that he did have "choke" she thought it was not from food and more likely a tumor or sort internally. Because with "real" choke with food or grain she has never had one that she couldnt fix let alone that had to be put down because of it. I hope we did the right thing and i think trailering him to have surgery would have been unrealistic especially since we all agreed the odds of it being a tumor or cancer were likely due to his declining condition.
 

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The toxin produced by the Clostridial bacterium causes motor paralysis which means that any nerves that function in the movement of the horse can be paralyzed. The signs for botulism in adult horses include:
Difficulty eating, difficulty swallowing, difficulty breathing, food and saliva in the nose, trouble walking, head low to the ground, recumbency, generalized progressive weakness, death

I've copied this from a website because sudden difficulty in swallowing that isn't 'apparently' caused by a blockage can be attributed to botulism poisoning. If there's any chance at all that the horse did eat something contaminated then you should check the feed and hay very carefully and also the pasture
 

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Discussion Starter #12
It was indeed a blockage just not a fixable one. Lastnight when the first vet was here it was visible on the horses throat as she was tubing him. Whether it was a blockage from hay or a tumor is unknown.
 

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What a sad end for the guy, but I think everyone did the right thing in the horse's best interest. It must have been an incredibly difficult decision for the owner to make.
 

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I'm sorry the final decision for the horse is the worst one we have to make whenever we have animals. However in this case, it was the only correct one for the horse at his age and the possibility of it being a tumor or cancer. My thoughts are with all of you who knew this horse.
 

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So sad, however it sounds like he was loved to the end. Hugs*
 
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