The Horse Forum banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,527 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How long did it take your horse to learn good leg cues and neck rein?

I've been riding Gunther 6 days a week and I haven't loped him yet. I want him to be so responsive with my legs at the walk and trot before I move up to a faster pace. At the walk he is great! All I have to do is barely point my toe and he goes in that direction, I don't have to do anything! At the trot I need to work harder, and sometimes I need to do a little direct reining. He's learning to neck rein and is getting better at it.



In general (I know not all horses are the same), how long did it take your horse?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,303 Posts
How long did it take your horse to learn good leg cues and neck rein?
I think it depends on how 'good enough' is your 'good', and it's difficult (at least for me) to objectively gauge real progress over periods less than a few months.

I look for consistancy, and I think that's what you're looking for, too. All our mares neck rein and move off the leg well, but the real difference between our young ones (6 and 8yrs) and our lead mare (16yr) is exactly that consistancy. Our lead mare will do it every time, regardless if you are on the trail or on the road with trucks going by, in good weather or on a windy, rainy day. She was a working cattle horse, so has plenty of miles under saddle, and I consider her 'finished'. Our young mares are certainly not to that point, and only miles, age, and experience will get them there. I'm not in a rush...my personal goal is to get them there by the time they are 12yrs.

....and good luck, sounds like you are well on the way there...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
965 Posts
Well I was working with this one horse and the neck reining took longer than training him to yeild to my legs. I'd say it took about a month for him to get the hang of my legs and about 2-3 months for the neck reining.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,746 Posts
I agree, this is a pretty broad question. A lot of it depends on the trainer - if you know what you're doing and are good at it, it's going to be easier to teach the horse to pick up as opposed to someone who's only got limited experiance.

Consistency, like Paint said, is the key (in both horse and rider) and I find it usually takes a few months to get there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,738 Posts
I agree with everybody, consistency and knowing what you're doing are both huge, in my opinion.
For instance, I've been trying to teach Lacey to neck rein for about the last year or so and it's only now that we've been able to neck rein at the canter. It would have been sooner but I'm dumb (and didn't know exactly what I was doing) and was accidentally pulling on her mouth to turn as I "neck reined" so I had to take time out to retrain her that pulling left means "go left" instead of "go right" like I had accidentally taught her.
However, I only discovered I was doing that about 4 months ago and once I fixed myself, she caught on super quickly. She always moved off my leg really well though so it really wasn't hard for her to understand. My favorite thing to do with her, to give her a little something to think about, is holding the reins but not using them at all. I enjoy seeing how much I can make her do without touching the reins, I think it's helping her become way more sensitive to my legs because she knows she can't rely on anything else.

Another thing that helped us a lot was the kind of reins I was using. To begin with I was using strange flat braided nylon reins that weren't very heavy or obvious at all and she figured out what I wanted but it was going really slowly. Then I switched to leather english reins which went better but not fantastic; then I got some rope split reins that have some weight and they're thicker, and suddenly she understood everything I wanted her to do!

Good luck! :) And sorry for the novel!
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top