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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
How much would a:
-registered section A welsh mountain pony
- black
-gelding
-11.3hh
-white blaze
-great conformation
- 4 years old
- jumps 2'3
- has show experience=champion in x-rails and halter
-bombproof
-good on trails
-good for kids
-able to go into river with rider
-good for bareback
-collects
-can go western or english

This is a really flashy pony with both its sire and dam being champions. It has been a champion in shows itself and is extremely well-trained four-year-old

***if you really need pictures I'll add them

***he'd be between 4.5-5 when he is sold
 

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So a four year old horse can do all that? I would question the horses health. 0_0 3 and 4 is usually when they start.
 

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I agree with White Foot. At just 4 years old... I wonder WHEN he was started (and HOW his joints will hold on).
 

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Discussion Starter #4
He would be started at 3.5-4 years old. At 3 -3.5 I would start building his muscles (no lunging yet because that is hard on the joints)
 

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If it could actually be accomplished in a year or so, he'd be worth a pretty penny. Being a champion at a crossrail class isn't going to amount to much - any horse can do that. The most important things would be for him to be a bombproof childs pony and a pro in the showring, and a lot of people aren't going to believe you can get a 4 year old pony with those traits.

At 11.3hh he would be shown by a VERY small and VERY young child. The child that can really ride would probably be looking at a more expensive, more well trained pony and the child that can't ride probably won't be interested in a young pony that needs more training.

In my area? I live in Canada, and you could easily get upwards of $5,000 for him most likely. However, we have not experience the recession here as the US has, and you can still get $2,000 for a well trained trail horse.
 

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Personally I'd never buy 4 year old 11 hh jumping 2+ feet. Because I have no idea how the joints will go in long run. I think horses should not be jumped until at least 5 years old, better 6 (well, I don't mind some free jumps though). But it's just me.
 

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In my area? I live in Canada, and you could easily get upwards of $5,000 for him most likely. However, we have not experience the recession here as the US has, and you can still get $2,000 for a well trained trail horse.
Hmmm.... May be I have to move to Canada. LoL!
 

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Personally I'd never buy 4 year old 11 hh jumping 2+ feet. Because I have no idea how the joints will go in long run. I think horses should not be jumped until at least 5 years old, better 6 (well, I don't mind some free jumps though). But it's just me.
I started jumping my mare at four -the standard age to start jumping- and She was doin 2'3" by the end of her four year old year. and 2'9" at five and 3'3" at six. And she's as sound as anything. My trainer is also a vet and checks her often and wouldnt let me do anything that isnt safe for her. And thoroughbreds can be jumped at three cause they grow up faster. But an average horse can start jumping at four. nothing wrong with it. ;)
 

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ummm horses can be started at two years...
they CAN, heck, you could start them at 1 if you could get on them, but its not that good for a ponies (they dont fully mature as fast as horses) joints to be jumping 2'3 at 4 years old :)

well... im not sure a 4 year old PONY (those little ******s are usually moody as saiten!!! lol) is very good to be sold to a kid...... Im not sure about where you live, but ANY pony that has a fantastic tempermant, no matter what they can do, is worth his weight in gold and more, haha.
 

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1 isnt good to start a horse. 2 you can start and do light work, 3 heavier work, no jumping, four heavy work and jumping.
 

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1 isnt good to start a horse. 2 you can start and do light work, 3 heavier work, no jumping, four heavy work and jumping.
That depends on the breed. I would never start jumping a horse at four. Frankly, I'm afraid for your horse in the future and I would question your vet and trainer. Why rush into things? If you started your horse say at the age of three then that horse is still learning the ropes and by no means would be ready to learn jumping.

I have never met a vet or trainer (in their right mind) that would say to let your horse jump 2-3ft at that age, it's just ludicrous. I can see poles and possibly 1ft..
 

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To clarify, the "growing up faster" thing.
 

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Ironically, horses like Thoroughbreds and Warmbloods are actually the SLOWEST maturing breeds, right up there with Drafts.

There is no such thing as a fast maturing breed - no breed matures, fully, before the age of 6 years old. The smaller your horse is, the more likely he'll be done fully fusing by the minimum 6 years old (skeleton).

The BIGGER your horse is, the LONGER it takes - particularily with very tall horses that have elongated skeletons. It is much more likely that your Thoroughbred isn't fully mature, skeleton wise, until he's closer to 8 years old.

Just because they race 'em, doesn't make it right - the injuries and breakdowns speak for themselves. Maturity has NOTHING to do with breed and everything to do with size and skeleton shape - a 17hh Quarter Horse would take longer to mature, for example, then a 15hh Thoroughbred.
 

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oh well i am just repeatin what my friend said. she has two tbs. Im not very familiar with the breed myself.
 

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Back to the OT.....

In the hunter world people are willing to pay quite a bit for a bombproof fancy pony. Ponies that qualify for Pony Finals are often EASILY in the 6 figure range. There are a few factors though that greatly affect a pony's price. Assuming she wants to market him as a hunter: is he a good mover? This is a HUGE pricing factor. Does he have a lead change, preferably an auto change? Even the fanciest moving pony with no change will not be worth that much. 11.3 is pretty small. Does he have a big enough stride? For the small division, people want their ponies as close to 12.2 as possible so they can get down the lines easily. When say, "can jump 2"3" do you mean he's jumped it before or he can easily do a course at 2"3? How many shows has he done? IF the pony is super fancy, has an auto change, can pack a child around a course and win ribbons, has a decent show record for his age, the pony can easily start off at $25K. I have a feeling that he won't be able to do all of that yet at only 4 y/o and would be considered more of a "prospect", which puts him closer to $5,000. His biggest problem will be his size. It's hard to find parents who are willing to pay for a pony that the kid will grow out of within a year or two. Without seeing a video or pictures I'm going to say he's probably no more then $5k.
 

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The most important things would be for him to be a bombproof childs pony and a pro in the showring, and a lot of people aren't going to believe you can get a 4 year old pony with those traits.



I can believe it. We had a pony in our barn, large, super fancy pony who went to Pony Finals at age 4, he was totally bombproof even when we started him at 3. He was just that kind of pony who is super mature, professional and chill with everything going on around him.

He also didn't need a lot of prep. We worked him on the lunge a lot and he jumped not very often, everytime we did jump him he was such a Pro about it all that he'd lay a perfect trip about everytime, no constant drilling or pounding there.

Though those kinds of ponies are few and far between. Totally not the norm but it can happen.
 
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