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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I want opinions. Other then mine. I was curious, how much is to much for a green horse? My little mare has had about 30 rides. But it has been awhile since she has been ridden, I don't know exactly how long. I only get to work her one time a week. Which sucks. But is better then nothing. I wanted to know how fast you think I can move. The girl who did most the riding on me told me that the little mare doesn't really like the bit much. She rode her in a full cheek snaffle bit. I have a mullen mouth eggbut bit, a smooth wire loose ring snaffle, and I have an english hackamore. All of which I can try and see what works best for her. I feel like maybe I should only work a little with her at a time. Like saturday maybe I should just figure out which bit or the hackamore she is happy with. And then work with her in it along with lunging her and doing ground work. And then maybe I should do this each time I see her until I feel she is ready for a saddle. I was told she used to rear up off and on . But nothing very high. This is something that I won't tolerate. And I will make that clear from the beginning. When it is time for the saddle I will lunge her with it on, make the stirrups move around and bump her, and make her work through all gates saddled while lunging her. After this is tackled and accepted I then want to add a rider. Just somebody to sit on her while I lunge her. Not making giving her any cues at first. Just being a passenger. I expect this is take at least a month and a half for this to happen. Considering I only see her once a week until late march or when ever I can get fence posts in the ground. What do you guys think?
 

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You only asked what she was worth. We do not know how old she is, if she is registered or not, what kind of conformation she has, etc. Generally speaking, green broke horses with 30 scattered out rides are worth about $200.00 or $400.00. If they are exceptionally good looking or very well bred, then, they are worth more. If they are small, plain looking or thin, they are worth even less.

Generally, horses are worth how well trained they are. The sale last Monday here in town, saw horses sell for $25.00 up to $3000.00. There were several unregistered geldings that sold for more than $2500.00 but they were broke, broke, broke. A couple of registered mares sold for that much. The green, grade horses brought $100.00 to about $300.00, depending on looks and just how green they were.
 

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A great book for you would be the Basic Training of the Young Horse by Reiner Klimke, or the updated version by his daughter, Ingrid Klimke.

Generally speaking, an experienced, balanced and tactful rider can push the horse to be riding out safely, jumping a little and experienced in competition in their first year. I think the real danger in an inexperienced person working with a young horse is that they progress too slow and are not challenged enough - so they develop a "comfort zone" and the dangerous behaviors come when the horse is then pushed out of this. Aim for making a little bit of progress every day, and don't make excuses for the horse. "Oh I don't want to do x because she's young" is a great way to create a monster. Young horses should be dragged around to everything and see everything! It is easy to get the horse used to things when they are young and don't have a sense of what is "normal" yet. They don't know trail riding is supposed to be scary, or that jumping is hard, or that there's a monster at the one show arena, until you let them stagnate and get too comfortable.
However, this can always be done in a safe manner.

On a horse with 30 days I would expect that it can be tacked up, lunged for a few minutes and then be ridden w/t/c with some poles, beginning turn on the forehand and some leg yields to the wall. Only worked for total 20-30 minutes each day, 4-5 days a week until they are fit enough to do more.
I would NOT use a wire bit, or a hackamore. A plain snaffle will do you just fine.
 

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I think the OP is asking how fast to move in regards to training??? I think?

I'm going to run with that idea. Personally, I don't think riding an extremely green youngster once a week is a good idea. I would do further ground work, getting her respectful, comfortable with her tack and responsive on the ground before worrying about riding. At the end of march, when you have more time, put lots of rides on her up to 6 days a week, slowly building a good foundation, w/t/c. By the end of the summer (of consistent riding)you should have a horse with a very nice foundation on her.

the little mare doesn't really like the bit much. She rode her in a full cheek snaffle bit. I have a mullen mouth eggbut bit, a smooth wire loose ring snaffle, and I have an english hackamore.
first, check her teeth. She might need them done. Second, if she has a low pallet, a single jointed bit wont work well for her. your mullen mouth might be ok, or a French link. I would absolutely NOT put a wire bit on a baby, and a mechanical hackamore has little side to side control, with lots of stopping power, a bad choice for a green horse where directional control is so important and they don't yet move off legs or neck reining. If you want a bitless, try a side pull. they are the least confusing for a green horse.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
You only asked what she was worth. We do not know how old she is, if she is registered or not, what kind of conformation she has, etc. Generally speaking, green broke horses with 30 scattered out rides are worth about $200.00 or $400.00. If they are exceptionally good looking or very well bred, then, they are worth more. If they are small, plain looking or thin, they are worth even less.

Generally, horses are worth how well trained they are. The sale last Monday here in town, saw horses sell for $25.00 up to $3000.00. There were several unregistered geldings that sold for more than $2500.00 but they were broke, broke, broke. A couple of registered mares sold for that much. The green, grade horses brought $100.00 to about $300.00, depending on looks and just how green they were.
I wasn't asking how much she was worth
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I think the OP is asking how fast to move in regards to training??? I think?

I'm going to run with that idea. Personally, I don't think riding an extremely green youngster once a week is a good idea. I would do further ground work, getting her respectful, comfortable with her tack and responsive on the ground before worrying about riding. At the end of march, when you have more time, put lots of rides on her up to 6 days a week, slowly building a good foundation, w/t/c. By the end of the summer (of consistent riding)you should have a horse with a very nice foundation on her.



first, check her teeth. She might need them done. Second, if she has a low pallet, a single jointed bit wont work well for her. your mullen mouth might be ok, or a French link. I would absolutely NOT put a wire bit on a baby, and a mechanical hackamore has little side to side control, with lots of stopping power, a bad choice for a green horse where directional control is so important and they don't yet move off legs or neck reining. If you want a bitless, try a side pull. they are the least confusing for a green horse.
This is the answer I wanted. After posting this I was thinking just to get her good on the ground, with her tack, and very respectful. Then when I can ride her and work her every day then start riding.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
A great book for you would be the Basic Training of the Young Horse by Reiner Klimke, or the updated version by his daughter, Ingrid Klimke.

Generally speaking, an experienced, balanced and tactful rider can push the horse to be riding out safely, jumping a little and experienced in competition in their first year. I think the real danger in an inexperienced person working with a young horse is that they progress too slow and are not challenged enough - so they develop a "comfort zone" and the dangerous behaviors come when the horse is then pushed out of this. Aim for making a little bit of progress every day, and don't make excuses for the horse. "Oh I don't want to do x because she's young" is a great way to create a monster. Young horses should be dragged around to everything and see everything! It is easy to get the horse used to things when they are young and don't have a sense of what is "normal" yet. They don't know trail riding is supposed to be scary, or that jumping is hard, or that there's a monster at the one show arena, until you let them stagnate and get too comfortable.
However, this can always be done in a safe manner.

On a horse with 30 days I would expect that it can be tacked up, lunged for a few minutes and then be ridden w/t/c with some poles, beginning turn on the forehand and some leg yields to the wall. Only worked for total 20-30 minutes each day, 4-5 days a week until they are fit enough to do more.
I would NOT use a wire bit, or a hackamore. A plain snaffle will do you just fine.
I am going to get a plain snaffle for her. Until then we are just going to be working in a rope halter and I may try the mullen mouth on her. But if she doesn't take to it then that will be out of the question
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Do you guys think it would be okay to try the mullen on her before I go out and buy another bit? I have very soft hands. I am as soft as I can be as long as it gets an answer.
 

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People quite often used to start horses in mullen mouth bits so I don't see why you shouldn't try it - but don't expect her to like it immediately - its new and strange. Give the horse a chance to get used to it before you start giving up and buying new bits to try
When I break a horse it gets lunged with a bridle underneath a lunging cavesson well before anyone gets on its back and takes a hold of the reins.
 

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What is she doing to express her dislike of the bit?

The mullen mouth should be fine- a nice, smooth, not-too-thick, not-too-thin mullen mouth is pretty mild, but without a joint it doesn't give quite as refined a signal as a a single or double jointed mouth. However, if she goes well in it I wouldn't worry about getting a different bit at this point.

Make sure the bit fits her well- not too narrow or too wide for her mouth. If you think she just needs some additional time to adjust to it, you can have her just carry the bit in her mouth while you're riding with reins attached to the rope halter or other bitless bridle, then move up to having two sets of reins (one on the rope halter, one on the bit) and gradually work it into the routine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
People quite often used to start horses in mullen mouth bits so I don't see why you shouldn't try it - but don't expect her to like it immediately - its new and strange. Give the horse a chance to get used to it before you start giving up and buying new bits to try
When I break a horse it gets lunged with a bridle underneath a lunging cavesson well before anyone gets on its back and takes a hold of the reins.
Can you briefly tell me some things I could/should do to try to get her used to it before I buy a different bit? If you don't mind. This is my first green horse. All the others I had rode in a twisted wire o ring or a curb bit as they were older or harder in the mouth. So I never had to go through trying a bunch of new bits to say.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
What is she doing to express her dislike of the bit?

The mullen mouth should be fine- a nice, smooth, not-too-thick, not-too-thin mullen mouth is pretty mild, but without a joint it doesn't give quite as refined a signal as a a single or double jointed mouth. However, if she goes well in it I wouldn't worry about getting a different bit at this point.

Make sure the bit fits her well- not too narrow or too wide for her mouth. If you think she just needs some additional time to adjust to it, you can have her just carry the bit in her mouth while you're riding with reins attached to the rope halter or other bitless bridle, then move up to having two sets of reins (one on the rope halter, one on the bit) and gradually work it into the routine.
I am not quiet sure what she did to express her dislike of it. I have never bridled her or ridden her. This info came from the lady who started her. I am assuming she resisted against it and I think reared up possibly. Not definite though. Her teeth are good. They were done 4 weeks ago. She has no wolf teeth.
 

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Have her wearing the bridle under a halter and lead her around off the halter
Lunge her with the bridle under whatever you use to lunge her in
As Verona suggested - Have the bridle under a halter and ride off reins attached to the halter
As she gets used to the bit you can begin leading her direct and then riding her directly on the bit so she gets used to pressure gradually - if she understands whoa then ask for whoa and at the same time apply a little pressure on the bit so she associates the pressure with the cue. You can do the same thing when leading her to ask her to turn - a bit of pressure on the left or right rein as you 'lead' her in that direction
What you want to aim for is a horse that responds to the lightest cues from your hands
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Have her wearing the bridle under a halter and lead her around off the halter
Lunge her with the bridle under whatever you use to lunge her in
As Verona suggested - Have the bridle under a halter and ride off reins attached to the halter
As she gets used to the bit you can begin leading her direct and then riding her directly on the bit so she gets used to pressure gradually - if she understands whoa then ask for whoa and at the same time apply a little pressure on the bit so she associates the pressure with the cue. You can do the same thing when leading her to ask her to turn - a bit of pressure on the left or right rein as you 'lead' her in that direction
What you want to aim for is a horse that responds to the lightest cues from your hands
I feel very dumb asking this. But do you not use a chin strap on a mullen mouth egg but bit? I am trying to set it up on a headstall
 

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If the horse is eventually going to go in some sort of bit that has a chin strap, then I usually put it on later in their green horse training to get them used to it. It would be put on behind the reins on the eggbutt. Over here they are required for competition in any green horse classes.

For now, though, just stick with the bit. Introduce one new thing at a time. Your main goal is to get her learning how to efficiently bend, and you don't need a chinstrap for that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
If the horse is eventually going to go in some sort of bit that has a chin strap, then I usually put it on later in their green horse training to get them used to it. It would be put on behind the reins on the eggbutt. Over here they are required for competition in any green horse classes.

For now, though, just stick with the bit. Introduce one new thing at a time. Your main goal is to get her learning how to efficiently bend, and you don't need a chinstrap for that.
Okay, I just feel like the bit would move around a lot without a chin strap. (I have always used a chin strap, but then again I have never used this bit. I guess I will start without one and then add it later. It just seriously seems like it will flip around without it, maybe not. Also, how would the chin strap work if it is behind the reins? I always put them before the reins.
 

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I've never used chin straps with snaffles. They don't really do anything one way or the other IMO. The chin strap shouldn't be at all tight, so it's not going to help stabilize the bit, and if the bit is getting pulled through the horse's mouth something else is going wrong in the training process. A full cheek snaffle (with keepers!) is the best way to get a very stable bit, though this isn't an issue for most horses, and the cheeks provide extra guidance for green horses who are just learning to steer.

A properly placed and adjusted chin strap on a snaffle bit:
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I've never used chin straps with snaffles. They don't really do anything one way or the other IMO. The chin strap shouldn't be at all tight, so it's not going to help stabilize the bit, and if the bit is getting pulled through the horse's mouth something else is going wrong in the training process. A full cheek snaffle (with keepers!) is the best way to get a very stable bit, though this isn't an issue for most horses, and the cheeks provide extra guidance for green horses who are just learning to steer.

A properly placed and adjusted chin strap on a snaffle bit:

IMO that chin strap is way to loose. It shouldn't even be used if it is that loose. They are supposed to be able to feel it. I have always made sure my chin strap stays in contact with the horse. but that one just wow... I don't think that is properly fit.
 

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The use of chin straps means nothing to me - I'm British and only ride in English bridles with a noseband
I'm assuming they have a purpose but someone else would need to explain that one!!
 
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