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After all that time I spent being unable to decide when / if to put sheets on them, the weather has made it clear that they need them now. I put them on this morning. Looking at the forecast, I suspect they'll need to have them on between now and Tuesday, actually maybe Wednesday.

So I was wondering, when your horses are in turnout sheets or blankets, how often do you check to make sure there aren't any rubs or weird spots? And do you take the sheets off and give them a good once-over, or just lift it up and check in the places where you'd expect to see problems?

Note that my horses are boarded so it's unlikely that I'm going to go all the way out there to check them every day.
 
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I check whenever I ride, so 3 times a week. Pretty quickly you'll know if a spot is going to rub or not.
 
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If we ride blankets are taken off horses brushed. Haven't ridden in almost two weeks. To cold so blankets stay on, no checking going on. Never have had blanket rubs on either horse so not worried.
 

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I meant to write more, but my time got cut short with work.

Usually, I monitor it more closely once blankets get put on for the first time in the year OR coat length changes (so after I did a partial clip). If a horse isn't showing any sort of rubs in the first week or two, I haven't seen rubs happen anytime after that. Some horses that don't rub with a full coat of hair will rub if they are body clipped at all. Minnie never had any rubs before when she had a full coat, but as soon as she was clipped, her points of shoulder and neck rub (and were resolved with a Sleazy shoulder guard).

I'm more aware of rubbing happening if there is any chance of either horse getting a little "steamy" under their blanket. Toofine tends to run hot with his medication, so he tends to feel a little steamy and warm compared to Minnie's "room temp" - if that makes any sense at all to anyone but myself. I check him no matter what if I'm out at the barn, even if it's just for dropping off feed, just because he is warmer.

Moisture + friction in my mind, causes rubes faster than friction alone.

One thing to keep in mind with using a shoulder guard or full body length guard that if there is any chance of moisture getting to it, it will stay wet until it is removed and hung to dry. After a heavy snow storm I found the edges of Minnie's shoulder guard to be soaked through despite being blanketed, so it was actually aggravating her rub marks.
 

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I dont like leaving blankets unchecked for more than 2-3 days at a time, preferably every other day if I'm not there every day. I like to pull the blanket(heated barn) and let them roll if possible. Otherwise just a good currying.

Rare times I cant bring him inside(like his asthma is acting up), I'll do my best to adjust the blanket and run a curry under the blanket along the hips and neck.
 

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I was taught to check morning and night if they're out 24/7 and I still do it that way.

It depends on how much time I have and the weather. It could be anything from a quick onceover to a full refitting.

I'll always run my hand under to check their temperature and occasionally I'll Quarter to freshen up, if they're not being groomed to ride.
 
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I found that more often than not places I boarded over rugged or left it on basically - or if the owner rugged staff still don't make an effort to change even if just for a few hours of sunshine. Hopefully yours is different. As a result I tend to rug lighter than what I would if I was available every day, especially if there is grazing/hay available round the clock and at night. So if its "warmer" day but the night needs a heavy.. I'd put a medium on and without neck. Hope that makes sense. I prefer to play it safer and they shiver a few hours than potentially get heatstroke. A good brushy every few days. When it is pouring I check the front, belly and run an arm down as far as I can - safety permitting. I learned not to do this in the field with a moody mare running at us.. tangled with an arm in a rug ahha. No thank you! Ah the bliss of being able to pop down and change. I don't think I can give this up..
 

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Mine wear turnouts off and on all winter. I check with the NWS web-site daily, and try to stay ahead of approaching storm systems/cold fronts. I don't generally blanket for just cold, but for cold + wind, and especially for warmer weather followed by rapidly falling temperatures and precipitation. (The norm on the Colorado Front Range.) I check and adjust morning and evening (at least) when they are wearing their turnouts, and pull them as soon as the weather clears. We only stock "heavy-weight" blankets; if I put them on to keep my Equines warm, I want them to do so, come what may. The critters seem to agree; I never get any arguments.
But of course this means that they blame me for the bad weather:
"Here comes that human with the blankets." "Yea, every time he gets them out, it gets cold and snows." "Well, I wish he'd just leave them in the barn, then . . ." ;-)
On the positive side, when it's real cold, and you can no longer feel your fingers, the warm space between equine and blanket is a welcome haven. Better than anything else, short of a hot mug of your favorite winter beverage.

Steve (Who is looking at just that scenario unfolding over the remainder of the week.)
 

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You're supposed to check daily... but I don't. And I think everyone who read my "Help me figure out Rusty's medication schedule" thread would agree that I tend to go above and beyond. Harley wears a blanket often in the winter, and does get rubs. We ride about 3 days a week at minimum, but lately, have not been able to keep that up for a variety of reasons (mostly stupid weather). So obviously, he gets a good brushing when we get him ready for a ride. Otherwise, I try to take it off every 2-3 days for a few hours, and just replace it with a fleece (he's gentle with his blankets so we can do that with him, but it's not recommended to turn out a horse with just a fleece cooler) for the warmer hours of the afternoon, especially on a sunny day. If the temps go above freezing, I will even take it off for a few hours and put it back on late afternoon.

Harley gets rubs. He never used to, but now he does. We got him a Bob's Bib, which goes on under his blankets and so far, it has worked wonderfully. It only protects his shoulder, withers, and chest, but that's where he would get rubs before. To be clear, the rubs never got too bad, just spots where the hair was shorter. This year, with the Bob's Bib, not a single rub.

The other thing you need to be concerned about if your horses are wearing blankets for extended periods of time is moisture. Some can get a type of rain rot from moisture getting trapped by the blanket. Just another good reason to take it off for a few hours and let the horses' skin breathe. Harley does get a bit of dander when he wears his winter blanket too long.
 
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