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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

Almost each time I’m going to take the horse in the field for my lessons, he’s always have his ears on his back and try to jump on me. The trick is to move the halters around to scare the horse and make him run a bit until he stop moving for good, but how can I stop that from happening?

I’m trying to be the most gentle possible, but this horse just don’t like me or like to go to the lessons.

Another problem is when putting the saddle, always ears on his back and try to bite me. Same when tightening the strap the slowest possible.

Maybe a trauma from someone before me and my instructor before she owned it? How to reverse this?

Thank you
 

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Horses use body language as their main form of communication. Ears are a part of the body, and therefore can be used for communication. It's called "body language" - not "ear language". You have to look, listen, and read the entire horse; do not take something out of context. Ears back and ears flatly pinned are two very different things. For most horses, simply having their ears back is not really enough to warrant doing anything. The horse could be listening to something behind them, relaxing, standing in the wind, or in pain.

I do not understand what you mean by "try[ing] to jump on me." Do you mean the horse is moving forward and you just so happen to be in the way or that the horse is literally jumping on top of you, as in attacking? Perhaps you could clarify?

The trick is to move the halters around to scare the horse
Unless the horse is being extremely aggressive and/or trying to kill you, for most of the time, you should not be trying to purposefully scare the horse as a form of correction. The purpose is to redirect and teach the horse - not scare them; a horse cannot both respect and fear you.

I’m trying to be the most gentle possible
While it's good that you are trying to be gentle, if it's not working, then it's not working. Do not do the same thing over and over again and expect the horse to give you a different result. You either need to change the question, change the way you ask the question, or change the amount of pressure. "If the horse gives you the wrong answer, it means you asked the question wrong, for horses are (usually) a reflection of how they are handled." Set the horse up for success (not failure) and help them find the right answer.

this horse just don’t like me or like to go to the lessons.
Is this a lesson horse? Many lesson horses tend to be jaded, especially if they are teaching beginners, especially, especially if those said beginners only go out there and work the horse.

Another problem is when putting the saddle, always ears on his back and try to bite me.
This goes back to my previous comment. How is his health? Horses that are in pain, such as from ulcers, can get girthy. How does his tack fit? Ill fitting tack can be uncomfortable, and in more extreme cases or with sensitive horses, cause pain. How do you ride? If you're unbalanced, flopping, and bouncing around or ride like sack of potatoes, that can cause the horse's back to become sore, especially if coupled with ill fitting tack.

Has he had this problem before? If not, then it is likely to have been caused by one (or some) of the above factors or something else. If he has had this problem before, it could be because he never learned to accept that being girthed is okay.

ETA:
What do you do when he tries to bite you? If you flinch and yield, that is basically teaching the horse that biting, or the attempt of, is the right answer. If you do so, the more you do it, the lesson gets reaffirmed every time, and the behavior will be more difficult to adjust later on. If you correct sometimes and yield other times, that confuses the horse about whether or not biting, or the attempt of, is okay or not. Once you set your rules, you have to be consistent.

Do not be quick to blame the horse. Examine the above and get back to us.
 

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Helloo Nic,

It would help us find you a solution if we can know a little bit more about you and your horse. How old is your horse?? When did you get him?? When you bought him was he green or newly broke or rideable ect??
 

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This reminds me of the time I posted about a particular lesson horse and their 'attitudes'. I remember good advice, and not so good advice...something a long the lines of 'give up'. Well don't give up.

(I'm saying this in the assumption that the horse has no health problems that is making him/her act in a certain way. You should ask someone who knows the horse if he or she has any issues first and foremost).

Check for body language before you approach the horse, and when you do approach the horse, assess the situation. Horses will often try things like biting, running, etc because they do not respect you or are not wanting to do what you ask of them. That's any animal. The key is consistency. If you find something that works, keep doing it. As it was said, if you flinch or are acting afraid, you are teaching the horse it is okay to continue its behavior. I dealt with a horse that bit me due to girth issues (no health issues, just jaded..too many beginners). What worked for me was holding a lead rope. If the horse tried to bite, he'd get a little tap with the soft end of the rope and a sharp 'NO' or similar noise to grab his attention. It was such a light tap- but the action of standing my ground like that made him keep his distance. He never tried to do it again.

Now not everything is going to work for every horse, and it is up to you to find out what can work specifically. But I believe standing your ground (no fear) and being clear with your intent. Words mean nothing to animals. Body language and intent is key. Save the sweet talk for a reward.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Horses use body language as their main form of communication. Ears are a part of the body, and therefore can be used for communication. It's called "body language" - not "ear language". You have to look, listen, and read the entire horse; do not take something out of context. Ears back and ears flatly pinned are two very different things. For most horses, simply having their ears back is not really enough to warrant doing anything. The horse could be listening to something behind them, relaxing, standing in the wind, or in pain.

I do not understand what you mean by "try[ing] to jump on me." Do you mean the horse is moving forward and you just so happen to be in the way or that the horse is literally jumping on top of you, as in attacking? Perhaps you could clarify?

The trick is to move the halters around to scare the horse
Unless the horse is being extremely aggressive and/or trying to kill you, for most of the time, you should not be trying to purposefully scare the horse as a form of correction. The purpose is to redirect and teach the horse - not scare them; a horse cannot both respect and fear you.

I’m trying to be the most gentle possible
While it's good that you are trying to be gentle, if it's not working, then it's not working. Do not do the same thing over and over again and expect the horse to give you a different result. You either need to change the question, change the way you ask the question, or change the amount of pressure. "If the horse gives you the wrong answer, it means you asked the question wrong, for horses are (usually) a reflection of how they are handled." Set the horse up for success (not failure) and help them find the right answer.

this horse just don’t like me or like to go to the lessons.
Is this a lesson horse? Many lesson horses tend to be jaded, especially if they are teaching beginners, especially, especially if those said beginners only go out there and work the horse.

Another problem is when putting the saddle, always ears on his back and try to bite me.
This goes back to my previous comment. How is his health? Horses that are in pain, such as from ulcers, can get girthy. How does his tack fit? Ill fitting tack can be uncomfortable, and in more extreme cases or with sensitive horses, cause pain. How do you ride? If you're unbalanced, flopping, and bouncing around or ride like sack of potatoes, that can cause the horse's back to become sore, especially if coupled with ill fitting tack.

Has he had this problem before? If not, then it is likely to have been caused by one (or some) of the above factors or something else. If he has had this problem before, it could be because he never learned to accept that being girthed is okay.

ETA:
What do you do when he tries to bite you? If you flinch and yield, that is basically teaching the horse that biting, or the attempt of, is the right answer. If you do so, the more you do it, the lesson gets reaffirmed every time, and the behavior will be more difficult to adjust later on. If you correct sometimes and yield other times, that confuses the horse about whether or not biting, or the attempt of, is okay or not. Once you set your rules, you have to be consistent.

Do not be quick to blame the horse. Examine the above and get back to us.
The horse has the ears like this image
https://s.equimed.com/images/arch/2/2z/2zm.jpg

By trying to jump on me, I mean that like always, he is eating in the field with his friends. I’m approaching slowly and talk to the horse in a gentle way and try to be fun, but when I’m around 3-4 meters from the horses, he put his ears backward.

Here is where it’s complicated, because I need this horse for the lessons. If I start approaching to put halters on the horse, he run away or try to rush on me.

The horse, I don’t think it’s a stallion, but he seems very dominant, like if he runs away, all other horses start following him (or her).

So I’m running after the horse. Other horses seem to circle around saying like «*stop that and go to work*» and kind of protect me. When he tries to rush on me or show his ***, I’m moving the leash to scare the horse until he finally stop moving and that I can take him to the barn.

For the saddle part, the horse only see the saddle that he try has his ears backward and try to bite, but his head is attached to each side. When he try to buy me, I’m pushing his head away. When tightening the strap for the saddle, it start again.

Maybe it’s a very sensitive horse or a student in the past did something wrong with a past instructor, so the owner does lot know?

Other that those moments, the horse is calm and really good, but I want to find a way to make the horse have more confidence into humans and me.

Please consider that the OP might not be a native speaker of English. Thi might affect how one interpretes his/her post, and in how you write your response.
Thank you. I don’t know all technical terms in English and when I wrote that, I didn’t have time to use a dictionary.
Helloo Nic,

It would help us find you a solution if we can know a little bit more about you and your horse. How old is your horse?? When did you get him?? When you bought him was he green or newly broke or rideable ect??
It’s not my horse, it’s the horse of the owner of the place. As I know it’s an almost 15yo Quarter Horse which is good for lessons. I don’t really know the background but that one time the horse became more agressive. Maybe a student wasn’t good with the horse? The owner also don’t know.
This reminds me of the time I posted about a particular lesson horse and their 'attitudes'. I remember good advice, and not so good advice...something a long the lines of 'give up'. Well don't give up.

(I'm saying this in the assumption that the horse has no health problems that is making him/her act in a certain way. You should ask someone who knows the horse if he or she has any issues first and foremost).

Check for body language before you approach the horse, and when you do approach the horse, assess the situation. Horses will often try things like biting, running, etc because they do not respect you or are not wanting to do what you ask of them. That's any animal. The key is consistency. If you find something that works, keep doing it. As it was said, if you flinch or are acting afraid, you are teaching the horse it is okay to continue its behavior. I dealt with a horse that bit me due to girth issues (no health issues, just jaded..too many beginners). What worked for me was holding a lead rope. If the horse tried to bite, he'd get a little tap with the soft end of the rope and a sharp 'NO' or similar noise to grab his attention. It was such a light tap- but the action of standing my ground like that made him keep his distance. He never tried to do it again.

Now not everything is going to work for every horse, and it is up to you to find out what can work specifically. But I believe standing your ground (no fear) and being clear with your intent. Words mean nothing to animals. Body language and intent is key. Save the sweet talk for a reward.
Thank you will keep these advices in mind.
 

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There are many ways to make "friends" with a horse, all of which require unfettered access. They all involve spending time with the horse doing what the horse likes doing: grazing, brushing, just hanging out. I realize that you don't have that opportunity.

To me, this is a lesson-sour horse. The image of another beginner students arriving and the thought of another beginner lesson makes him (or her - your words) recoil. This is not your fault.

The only thing you can try is to come early and leave late, to give that horse some pamper time. As indicated above, you need to stand your ground, but don't take the horse to the lesson as reward for complying, give it a genuine reward. If you take the horse to its pasture after the lesson, spend some time. Take a brush with you, maybe some carrots, and give it some loving, so that's the last thing the horse experiences in any encounter with you.

Pinning ears and moving away sounds like a thoroughly defensive move, but defensive aggression is a fact. From what I gathered from the narrative, this horse's lesson program needs to be severely downsized, because he's had it.
 

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The horse has the ears like this image
https://s.equimed.com/images/arch/2/2z/2zm.jpg

By trying to jump on me, I mean that like always, he is eating in the field with his friends. I’m approaching slowly and talk to the horse in a gentle way and try to be fun, but when I’m around 3-4 meters from the horses, he put his ears backward.
Those are those ears are trying to tell you something, And usually, there are many other things with there body language that will communicate with you that they are trying to say. This is not a good thing for a lesson horse to be doing.

So I’m running after the horse. Other horses seem to circle around saying like «*stop that and go to work*» and kind of protect me. When he tries to rush on me or show his ***, I’m moving the leash to scare the horse until he finally stop moving and that I can take him to the barn.
Running after a horse, Especially one that does not know you is not a good idea. If you run after a horse you are scaring them as that movement will cause them to see you as a predator. It sounds to me from many of your responses that you were turned out to go get this horse on your own too soon. Without enough knowledge of this horse and how to approach him/her. You know have taught this horse to fear you. By running after it and swinging halters and ropes around it. You should be asking the owner/ Lesson instructor whichever it may be, to go out with you and teach you how to properly catch and handle a horse/ This horse. So that you can gain its trust.


For the saddle part, the horse only see the saddle that he try has his ears backward and try to bite, but his head is attached to each side. When he try to buy me, I’m pushing his head away. When tightening the strap for the saddle, it start again.
This horse could be in pain. when tightening the strap ( Cinch ) some horses get what they call cinchy do to ulcers or having the cinch over tightened which causes discomfort. So they anticipate that discomfort and can give you signs of upset letting you know they don't like that. The owner/ trainer should be able to look into this problem.

Maybe it’s a very sensitive horse or a student in the past did something wrong with a past instructor, so the owner does lot know?
This stament concerns me as the owner/ instructor should know about there own horse and if they don't they should not be allowing a beginner on said horse.

Other that those moments, the horse is calm and really good, but I want to find a way to make the horse have more confidence into humans and me.
It is wonderful that you want to work on giving this horse more confidence with you.. As said above first step for you to do would be change the way you approach this horse. Don't chase the horse when it runs from you. Slow your pace, Pay attintion to how you are feeling. ( When you go into the pen are you feeling Stressed, scared, Rushed etc...) Horses can tell when we are anything but calm and will react to the invisible signs we give off about how we are feeling inside. Maybe if you can have the owner/ instructor get the horse for you with you following and observing. (If this horse is doing these things for the owner as well then there is something more going on.) They need to be showing you how to approach and catch a horse without creating stress and fear in them.


It’s not my horse, it’s the horse of the owner of the place. As I know it’s an almost 15yo Quarter Horse which is good for lessons. I don’t really know the background but that one time the horse became more agressive. Maybe a student wasn’t good with the horse? The owner also don’t know.
How did you find this Horse and instructor? Is the ower your teacher? Is this person that is teaching you actually an instructor? This is odd to me that the person you have chosen to teach you does not know about there own horse that they are entrusting to teach beginners. How long has this person had said lesson horse? If the owner cannot give you good answers I personally would stop lessons with this person and horse and look for someone else to teach you that has a good reputation in your area.

Thank you will keep these advices in mind.[/QUOTE]


I wish you luck on your equine journey. I hope that you can get the proper instruction that you need. Be safe and if what you are doing now with this horse is not working, there needs to be a change in what you're doing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
There are many ways to make "friends" with a horse, all of which require unfettered access. They all involve spending time with the horse doing what the horse likes doing: grazing, brushing, just hanging out. I realize that you don't have that opportunity.

To me, this is a lesson-sour horse. The image of another beginner students arriving and the thought of another beginner lesson makes him (or her - your words) recoil. This is not your fault.

The only thing you can try is to come early and leave late, to give that horse some pamper time. As indicated above, you need to stand your ground, but don't take the horse to the lesson as reward for complying, give it a genuine reward. If you take the horse to its pasture after the lesson, spend some time. Take a brush with you, maybe some carrots, and give it some loving, so that's the last thing the horse experiences in any encounter with you.

Pinning ears and moving away sounds like a thoroughly defensive move, but defensive aggression is a fact. From what I gathered from the narrative, this horse's lesson program needs to be severely downsized, because he's had it.
Yeah I will try to be here early and get some time with the horse before my lessons. Will try to keep the halter and leash on the fence when entering for the horse to see me without them. I don't know if he will still try to run away. I'm not stressed when going in the pasture. I'm just going quietly and talking, but well... I'm also not the only person taking this horse. I think there is one or two more persons the day before and I don't know for the other days.


For the lesson program, we are just walking in circle, trotting and canter while practicing some patterns.

Those are those ears are trying to tell you something, And usually, there are many other things with there body language that will communicate with you that they are trying to say. This is not a good thing for a lesson horse to be doing.

Running after a horse, Especially one that does not know you is not a good idea. If you run after a horse you are scaring them as that movement will cause them to see you as a predator. It sounds to me from many of your responses that you were turned out to go get this horse on your own too soon. Without enough knowledge of this horse and how to approach him/her. You know have taught this horse to fear you. By running after it and swinging halters and ropes around it. You should be asking the owner/ Lesson instructor whichever it may be, to go out with you and teach you how to properly catch and handle a horse/ This horse. So that you can gain its trust.

This horse could be in pain. when tightening the strap ( Cinch ) some horses get what they call cinchy do to ulcers or having the cinch over tightened which causes discomfort. So they anticipate that discomfort and can give you signs of upset letting you know they don't like that. The owner/ trainer should be able to look into this problem.

This stament concerns me as the owner/ instructor should know about there own horse and if they don't they should not be allowing a beginner on said horse.

It is wonderful that you want to work on giving this horse more confidence with you.. As said above first step for you to do would be change the way you approach this horse. Don't chase the horse when it runs from you. Slow your pace, Pay attintion to how you are feeling. ( When you go into the pen are you feeling Stressed, scared, Rushed etc...) Horses can tell when we are anything but calm and will react to the invisible signs we give off about how we are feeling inside. Maybe if you can have the owner/ instructor get the horse for you with you following and observing. (If this horse is doing these things for the owner as well then there is something more going on.) They need to be showing you how to approach and catch a horse without creating stress and fear in them.

How did you find this Horse and instructor? Is the ower your teacher? Is this person that is teaching you actually an instructor? This is odd to me that the person you have chosen to teach you does not know about there own horse that they are entrusting to teach beginners. How long has this person had said lesson horse? If the owner cannot give you good answers I personally would stop lessons with this person and horse and look for someone else to teach you that has a good reputation in your area.


I wish you luck on your equine journey. I hope that you can get the proper instruction that you need. Be safe and if what you are doing now with this horse is not working, there needs to be a change in what you're doing.

Hahaha. I think by running you are seeing me running after the horse like crazy, but in fact I'm just following him or walking to him. But how should I do for the horse to not see me as a predator?


My instructor said me that the horse should not win and should have a consequence by not being gentle, but you need to do it calmly and not attack the horse. I think she is kinda right about it. The horse need to understand that I'm coming gently, taking him to the barn and that he will return in the field after some exercice. My instructor is the owner of the place and she knows what to do with horses. She have some horses in pension and she already has to get rid of some horses owners who were not taking care of their horses correctly. She is a good instructor too and she has been doing that for years now. For the horse in particular, she said that it was fine before, but for a couple of months or 2-3 years from now, the horse started doing that and she is giving the horse some drugs for the pain and some rests most of the days.


I actually think than an old student just did something wrong one time and nobody was here to see that and since then, the horse is scare of humans.


Well... That being said, I will take it more slowly this time.
 

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But how should I do for the horse to not see me as a predator?
Don't act like one.

Respect is a two way street. Show some respect to the horse and the horse will show some respect to you.

Be conscious of the way you approach the horse. Predators tend to focus, streamline, and move directly to and into their target's face. Horses don't talk that way unless they are challenging.

If you have the time:
Walk casually and gently (with purpose but not focusing and targeting) toward the horse's shoulder or flank (or hip). If the horse walks away, walk with him; do not move faster than an walk. If he stops and/or looks at you, stop, back up, and face somewhere else (do not directly stare at the horse). Teach him that stopping and/or looking is the correct answer by taking off your pressure. Wait a few seconds before starting to try again. Rinse and repeat. You go to him whenever he walks and/or looks away.
When you get near him, do something he likes, such at being pet, swat flies, or giving him a treat, then walk away. Rinse and repeat a few times. Once he gets used to that, try rubbing him (on the neck and/or shoulder) with the halter and walk away. Rinse and repeat a few times. Teach him that every time you go to him, you aren't going to catch him. Once he get used to that, halter him, walk him a few steps, unhalter him. and walk away. Teach him that every time you halter him, he isn't going to go far and work.

For now, stay out of the horse's face as much as possible; only go to his face to put on his halter.
 

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I look at it as two appooaches;


1. you are just wandering in to the herd, making ZERO demands, just wanting to see if that horse would like to sniff you hand, or let you scratch him, or give him a treat. The way you moves is in a way that has NO intention. This means you have no expectation that the horse will want to be near you, or to come to you. you are going out with a 'question' in your body, and you are 'listening' to the hroses. This is a freindly manner, but, it is NOT sneaking up on the horses.


Walk out as if you are one of them; looking down occasionally for a delcious bit of grass, paw the dirt a bit, pause, look away , check your phone . . .etc. this demonstrate that you are comfortable there, have no plan, and are just 'one of them'.



let them approach or leave.



HOWEVER . . . if they approach and start to push into you, or put their mouth on you, then you do just enough (as little as possible) to say 'no!' and make them stop doing that, and then you go right back to just hanging out.
This is approach #1.


Approach #2. This is where you WANT something from them. You are going in to their territory but you have an intention in your body. You WANT them to notice you, and to pay attention to you. You walk in with an upright body. I don't mean you 'stomp' in, but you do not creep in, either.
If your horse pins his ears at you, you IMMEDIATELY interrupt that thinking on his part. you do something that makes him do ANYTHING different. YOu make some noise, or swing the rope or kick some dirt sideways, or slap your thigh. Do just enough for him to move his ears forward. He will because he will be surprised.


Now he will be looking at you with interest, instead of contempt or anger. When he does. you stop moving, and just stand quietly. you horse will be thinking about you, and what to do.


If he moves toward you, you do nothing. allow him to approach. If he turns away, AFTER he has actually turned away, you makes some more noise such that he is agains surprised, and he turns his head to look at you again. Stop, wait. let him choose to either approach you, or walk awy.


If he approaches, do nothing, if he turns away, do something that surprises him enough that he turns around and looks at you. Eventually, he will realize that when he turns away , things are NOT good, but when he turns Toward you, things ARE good.


when he approaches you, pet him a bit, then turn and WALK AWAY. I bet he will follow you!
 

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I think it's down right dangerous for the owner to ask you to bring a horse in by yourself in the circumstances that you describe. Even worse, that after you have asked for help, she gives you a vague description of what to do, when she should go herself and teach you!! Horses are 1000 lb plus of muscle, hooves and teeth, and a person can get hurt even by a horse accidently , much less one that has flattened his ears and approaches you aggressively. I strongly encourage you to start studying 'Horsemanship', or 'Natural Horsemanship' to learn how to read a horse,and how to be safe around a horse, for starters. Pick any well known Clinician-Pat Parelli, Buck Brannamon, Clinton Anderson, Craig Cameron, Julie Goodnight, Chris Cox are some of the top ones. It will cost you to buy the DVD's, or better yet hire a local horsemanship instructor for yourself if one is available, but it is money well spent and much less expensive than Trauma Care at at hospital. I truly can't believe the irresponsiblity of your instructor, and frankly, I'd be looking for another lesson barn. Lots of good tips already given but my take is that you have very little experience around horses and your best bet would be in person lessons on how to be safe handling a horse supplemented by horsemanship DVDs (seeing is better than just reading, even the good advice on here) , second best choice would be DVDs, I don't really see a safe third choice. Good luck and stay safe!! Keep us updated on how things are going.

Fay
 

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Agree with Fay. Your instructor should be teaching you how to handle a horse before expecting you to go off on your own and catch him! There is a fine line between letting you take charge and putting you in danger, and I fear this could lean into the danger category.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Update:

Today I arrive a bit earlier, but not enough lol. Whatever, I entered with the leash but put it on the fence before going see the horse and her friends. They were all eating like always, so I approached slowly and she didn’t move. Maybe it’s because I didn’t have the leash first?

So I decided to give some hay to the horse. It worked. After 10 minutes I had to prepare the horse, so I took the leash and the horse wasn’t scare like always.

Next time I will start again but will try to arrive more earlier.

My teacher explained me that the horse was doing competition between 18 months and 3-4 years old and after that she bought it. My teacher did some pleasure competition, but not too much like before. Maybe it’s at this time the horse developed fears into humans and saddle plus other problems with her legs like bone spavin...

We try to reverse that fear, but I guess it takes a lot of time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I think it's down right dangerous for the owner to ask you to bring a horse in by yourself in the circumstances that you describe. Even worse, that after you have asked for help, she gives you a vague description of what to do, when she should go herself and teach you!! Horses are 1000 lb plus of muscle, hooves and teeth, and a person can get hurt even by a horse accidently , much less one that has flattened his ears and approaches you aggressively. I strongly encourage you to start studying 'Horsemanship', or 'Natural Horsemanship' to learn how to read a horse,and how to be safe around a horse, for starters. Pick any well known Clinician-Pat Parelli, Buck Brannamon, Clinton Anderson, Craig Cameron, Julie Goodnight, Chris Cox are some of the top ones. It will cost you to buy the DVD's, or better yet hire a local horsemanship instructor for yourself if one is available, but it is money well spent and much less expensive than Trauma Care at at hospital. I truly can't believe the irresponsiblity of your instructor, and frankly, I'd be looking for another lesson barn. Lots of good tips already given but my take is that you have very little experience around horses and your best bet would be in person lessons on how to be safe handling a horse supplemented by horsemanship DVDs (seeing is better than just reading, even the good advice on here) , second best choice would be DVDs, I don't really see a safe third choice. Good luck and stay safe!! Keep us updated on how things are going.

Fay
Agree with Fay. Your instructor should be teaching you how to handle a horse before expecting you to go off on your own and catch him! There is a fine line between letting you take charge and putting you in danger, and I fear this could lean into the danger category.
I agree with you. I had some help at the start. One time we were three people... Now I’m alone, but if I feel like the horse will be difficult, I always have the possibility to have some help from the groom here, since my teacher is teaching other people.

But now I’m going alone, because I want the horse to know me better.
 

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I'm glad you had a successful time with her.

Those moments, where we are 'with' the horse , without requiring anything of them, are really valuable, in the long run.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Now it's a bit better. Less annoying in the field and she got her injection to reduce pain and size of the bone spavin. She has more energy now, but the problem is that she started bucking me when galloping... I don't know if it's because she is angry about me, she doesn't want to gallop or that she has pain? We think it's just because she doesn't want to gallop and she try to win over me, but I will not let the horse win, because after she will just repeat that again and again... Complicated horse lol.
 

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Don't think of it as winner / loser. Lesson horses are taught to be that way because instructors teach their students they need to win. Riding horses shouldn't require the rider to win and the horse to lose. Look for small compromises that will allow the horse to "win" sometimes. Maybe just stop and let the horse rest a few minutes. Look to see if there is something you can do the horse likes.

Horses seem to understand "Do this for me and then we will do this for you." Give and take. Give me a good trot for a minute, and then show me how good you can walk. Or even watch the others.

Also, IMHO, beginning riders need to learn to stay out of the mouth and off the back. Practice standing in the stirrups at a trot. Good for your balance and easier on the horse. Whenever possible, loose reins. It is hard not to bounce around when learning. With slack reins, you can bounce and not hurt the horse's mouth.

Learning to ride on a lesson horse is tough. I own an ex-lesson horse. He is the sanest trail horse of my three. I trust him more than any other - on a trail ride.

Almost 5 years after I got him, he'll still buck and fight if you ask him to ride around an arena. He melts down if someone tries to do ground work with him. But out on a trail, he's an outstanding little mustang! My wife rides about 6 times a year. He's the horse I trust to keep her safe...but he's borderline dangerous in an arena. It is a shame what we do to lesson horses:

 

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Why isn't your trainer catching the horse BEFORE your lesson? I do that for all my students as a courtesy. I let them groom and saddle under supervision, and NEVER use a horse unfit for lessons.
 

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Respect

Why isn't your trainer catching the horse BEFORE your lesson? I do that for all my students as a courtesy. I let them groom and saddle under supervision, and NEVER use a horse unfit for lessons.
 
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