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Discussion Starter #1
How do you ask for a flying change? I'm showing in May and am having problems picking up the correct lead after going over a jump diagonally across the ring. Any tips?
 

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Work with your trainer. A flying change is very hard to do, and very hard to make it look effortless. There is ALOT of work that goes into it with both horse and rider. And all horses can be asked differently. My trainer's GP dressage horse, all you have to do is change the distributation of your weight on his back and you get a flying change. So have your trainer work on it with you
 

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I agree, talk to a trainer. But I will tell you how I do it when I'm riding english....

So when I'm going to pick up the right lead I will use my left leg to slide back and push the hip in, and use the opposite rein to tip the nose in. Then ask for the lope. Now that you are loping ont he right lead, slide right leg back to push that hip in and the opposite rein for the nose. I'm a western rider and that has always been the technique I have taught my horses, only with reiners you jut have to change direction and they do it on their own :)
 

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Keep yourself balanced(step into your outside leg), get the horse collected under you and keep his head to the inside. A well trained horse should do it automatically
 

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I've never ridden a horse that does it when you just sit there and put their head in a bend.... I've always had to ask.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the advice everyone! I'll try that—outside leg, inside rein. He's pretty well trained, I just don't think I'm asking properly.
 

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I think you have asked the wrong question. I would ask "how do I tell the horse what lead to come OFF the jump with so I don't have to do a lead change". That is what I teach my students to aim for. Lead changes are a distraction on a jump course and usually unnecessary if the rider is doing their job.

That being said, since I also do dressage I would train my flying changes totally differently that a hunter rider would, so I probably won't go there.
 

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It seems to me like that would be kind of hard considering the fact I only jump about 2'3''. There's not much "hang time" to ask for a new lead in the air, so usually the horse lands on the same one it started on and you ask for the change after.
 

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My horse changes leads over 18" jumps. 2' and 2'3" should be a piece of cake for a horse.
 

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It seems to me like that would be kind of hard considering the fact I only jump about 2'3''. There's not much "hang time" to ask for a new lead in the air, so usually the horse lands on the same one it started on and you ask for the change after.
You don't wait until you're in the air to cue him. I start this training by cantering over a ground pole. It is all about what you are doing on your approach. If you wait until you are "in the air", about all you could do is duck, which is a no-no.
 

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It seems to me like that would be kind of hard considering the fact I only jump about 2'3''. There's not much "hang time" to ask for a new lead in the air, so usually the horse lands on the same one it started on and you ask for the change after.
I jump 2'3" also and if I'm asking properly (I'm still getting the hang of asking properly consistently) over the jump, most horses that I ride will pick up the correct lead. There is one horse that we have though, who isn't very bright (sweet as anything though), very stiff (we either call him a 2 by 4 or the freight train) and very off balance so he has problems changing leads over jumps, partly because he's not capable of doing it and partly because he gets confused as to what we're asking. And some of our horses are just really lazy and don't change leads over jumps unless you REALLY focus on it and kick the fire out of them.
 

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Also,
Always look where your going (you should be doing this even if your not trying to change leads) and if your looking where your going some horses (we have one like this) who will change leads just from that. But asking for the lead over the jump is different for different horses (at least at my barn). Some require kicking with the outside leg over the jump, others require lifting the inside rein. But before you get to the jump (like Allison said) you need to let the horse know where your going by giving a little pressure with your outside leg and a little pressure with your inside rein.
That's just what I do with the horses I ride
 

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The reason the horse changes when you look over a jump is because you put pressure with your legs and your center of gravity changes. Sit straight up, and turn your head to one side. Your shoulders automatically try to follow, turning your upper body, and when you are in a saddle, pressuer is put on with your outside thigh.
 
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