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I have a long time client I adore her as a person but her horses aren’t great.
I explained back in December that I need to start thinning out horses due to some chronic issues.
I brought the numbers of three farriers for her to try and find a new one.

She wouldn’t take the numbers and I didn’t hear from her again until May when her horse was lame from growing out 5.5 months.

I went to do them and finally snapped at her son (in his late 30’s at least, not a child) because he wasn’t doing anything useful.
He was just holding the rope and ignoring the horse slamming his feet down after about 30 seconds.
I told him “your job isn’t to stand there and look pretty” not my best moment. I’ve never spoken badly to a client before but I was beyond frustrated.

He was unhappy and I truly hoped he would talk his mom into finding someone else.

I’m scheduled to go back tomorrow and I’ve been trying to think of a way to make this the final time. I know she’ll talk me into setting up the next appointment.

I’ve never in 18 years intentionally skipped out on someone but I’ve been tempted all day to block her number and just not show up!
I won’t. It isn’t right, neither is lying to cancel which a few people suggested. I just don’t know a good way to say I won’t come back without her pleading until I give in.

She literally suggested I work until I need surgery then to do it and continue trimming!

I don’t want to tell her I’m retiring because (it’s not true) I’m still doing horses she knows.
 

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"I'm no longer available to trim your horses."

If you want, add "Thank you for your past business."

She may wail and gnash her teeth. She may say mean things about you. But so what?

You get hurt and she'll replace you like a dead battery and with as much concern.

And, if you get hurt by her ill-mannered horses, I promise you, she will make it your fault anyway.
 

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"I'm no longer available to trim your horses."

If you want, add "Thank you for your past business."

She may wail and gnash her teeth. She may say mean things about you. But so what?

You get hurt and she'll replace you like a dead battery and with as much concern.

And, if you get hurt by her ill-mannered horses, I promise you, she will make it your fault anyway.
This ^^^

Well said:clap::clap:
 
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Agree with the above post, but make sure she pays you first! Then get in your vehicle and leave. If she calls you, simply do not answer and do not respond to any message she may leave.
In addition to this quote make a new voice mail that says" I've cut back on my work load due to health reason and not taking anymore clients than those. Thank for you interest."
 

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The farrier that comes to trim my girls also tried to trim another persons two horses that had pretty unacceptable behavior. She just told the owner that she won't trim horses who act that way. Choices given to owner were better training, sedation or she wasn't doing them.
 

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You have told her, many months ago, that you were 'thinning out', so I'd probably just say this will be my last visit, as I'd explained previously. Let that be the end of the story. I would go tomorrow, as you've arranged it already, you should honour that. But just tell her straight & don't let her talk you into another visit. It's up to you whether you want to make some non-personal excuse as it sounds like you did in Dec, or whether you tell her the truth and say you're 'thinning out' the clients with difficult horses... and perhaps let her know that if she works on training(if that's the issue) and gets her horses good to handle, then you will reconsider her.

I just don’t know a good way to say I won’t come back without her pleading until I give in.

She literally suggested I work until I need surgery then to do it and continue trimming!
Don't give in, and I'd let her know that her pleading and esp the surgery comment is totally unreasonable. Make it clear to her that this is a hard job anyway and her horses(I'm assuming due to behaviour) make it a lot harder than it has to be, so you are no longer willing to put yourself at so much risk. Surgery or not, no one's going to give you a new back, so look after yourself! You don't want to be a cripple, for the sake of people like this.

I also do tell people on day 1 that I'm in it for the horse, so while I appreciate 'life happens' sometimes, if the owner won't put in any necessary effort for their horse or getting me regularly enough, or training their horse to ensure the job can be done properly(not to mention making a hard job as safe & easy as possible), then I won't be interested in continuing to service their horses. I do also train horses, and if that's the issue, I do also say I'm happy to take the time it takes to do some training, get them good about the job first, if they would like to employ me for my extra time on that note.

As for your snapping at the son, yeah, we're all human & appreciate muchly that it can get very frustrating dealing with some people & their horses. But I feel that if an owner is going to hold the horse, then, short of them preventing the horse walking away, they should NOT be doing anything to 'correct' the horse for that sort of thing. 'Standing there looking pretty' certainly beats jerking on or hitting the horse when I'm underneath it IMO!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Well, my arm was given me trouble last week and it got bad today too.

I trimmed two if the three, the last one has the best feet and will be okay going longer. She is finally going to look for someone else.

As far as correcting these aren’t poorly trained horses as much as very spoiled ones. After he slams his foot down if they would just say ‘Knock it off. Stand’ the horse would straighten up and stand pretty well. No need to snap the lead or do anything beyond asking them to focus and letting them know which behavior we don’t want.
Sometimes they’re really good but when they aren’t the owner is oblivious.

Hopefully not my problem anymore no matter how they behave.
 

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—-
well, my arm was given me

trouble last week and it got bad today too.

I trimmed two if the three, the last one has

the best feet and will be

okay going longer. She is finally going to look

for someone else.

As far as correcting these aren’t poorly

trained horses as much as

very spoiled ones. After he slams his

foot down if they would just

say ‘knock it off. Stand’ the horse would

straighten up and stand

pretty well. No need to snap the lead or do

anything beyond asking

them to focus and letting them know which

behavior we don’t want.

Sometimes they’re really good but when they

aren’t the owner is

oblivious.

Hopefully not my problem anymore no matter

how they behave.
—-


This ^^^ should never happen to a farrier - NEVV-ERR.

The two things that stand out are “-not poorly trained” and “-spoiled”.

This sort of stuff really frosts me and is partly why I have cut my posting down to near zero.

It is the responsibility of the owner to keep their horse(s) well mannered for the professional caregivers.. If you are Not capable of doing that, far as I’m concerned you shouldn’t own the cute little horse.

When a horse decides to slam its hoof down while the farrier is working on it, it will only be a matter of time before that horse starts misbehaving in other areas and the owner loses complete control.

I have a horse that used to slam his hooves down. “Used to” being the operative, years ago. He’s also not poorly trained but he is a con artist and has received 30 seconds of verbal and physical “I am going to kill you” more times than all the rest of my keeper horses put together.

He’s been with me 24 of his 26 years and this is how my current farrier trims him - gee I wonder how he got to be this well mannered.
CDE6022F-701B-4B72-88D1-EF9DEA9E4335.jpg

There are no “but but but’s” when it comes to mannerly horses. My Other horse is IR/Cushings and has foundered terribly in the past. He also has fractured his sacrum twice and is lucky to be alive. He is spoiled to the hilt yet his manners are always impeccable - always - even though it takes the farrier a good three hours to work on his hooves his excellent manners never waiver.

I am sorry to vent on your thread @farrieremily. I hear similar stories from my farrier, who is barely 40, has already had neck surgery and has left some unruly horses behind because their owners won’t correct them.

This kind of rude-no-excuse-for-such-shabby-farrier-treatment really infuriates me———
 

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You need to take care of you.

Our long term farrier retired end of last year. He’s in his 40s and is a sore mess.

Our farriers, who is in it for the past 20yrs said that good horses he charges $45/horse, hard ones are more and dangerous he doesn’t do. Fully respect that as I know I wouldn’t want to get under an unruly horse.
 

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I had one riding instructor, years ago, who rather than having to directly "fire" students, would send invitation letters out every spring to the students she wanted to teach again that year. Maybe you could "invite" the clients you want to keep, in a similar way, and let the others go.
 

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It is my understanding in some European countries, (Germany?), that it is still customary for the client to hold the horse's foot. I won't be trimming anybody's horses, but if I were, that would be a requirement.
 

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It is my understanding in some European countries, (Germany?), that it is still customary for the client to hold the horse's foot. I won't be trimming anybody's horses, but if I were, that would be a requirement.
Wouldn't that get crowded? Where would everyone stand? How do they not get in the way of each other, with one person's hands on the hooves and the other trying to work on them?

It seems like a potentially good idea for some horses, but I'm just wondering how it would work out.
 

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When I get a new farrier (much as I hate to, I've had a couple retire and had to fire a couple), we always have "the talk". It consists of, "My horses are trained well and are polite. If they are ever not, then I don't expect you to train them or reprimand them unless I physically cannot or it would be dangerous for me to do it instead of you. If I have a horse who is not good for the farrier, I will tell you so and we'll work on it however we have to. If the horse is young and learning, we'll work through it. If the horse is a spaz and just having a snit, I'LL fix it or either one of us is free to say, "Let's not work on that one today.". In the event that a horse needs it, I have Dormosedan in the house and we can use it as necessary. I NEVER expect the farrier to put him/herself in danger over one of my horses.".

Horses who do not behave and/or horses who get to "3 Strikes" on the spaz rule, get to find new homes, QUICKLY. I don't deal with them either, if it proves to be a chronic issue rather than just a bad day. I would not blame a farrier who fired me as a client if I couldn't/wouldn't make my horses behave. That job is hard enough without having to deal with bratty horses and clueless owners.

I would tell her that it's my last visit due to the horses behavioral issues and that I would not be back. I'd leave the numbers for the farriers I was referring her to somewhere in the barn if she wouldn't take the numbers. And then I'd give those farriers a heads up so they could have "full" schedules should they choose not to accept her.

I have a friend who's a hauler and I've referred a lot of people to him because he's really good with the horses and totally puts their needs first. He gets hired to fly overseas with the horses, a lot. Once I've given the referral, I send him a quick email and tell them my experience with the individual and the horse. It's up to him whether he takes them on as a client. I certainly don't blame him if he turns a couple of them down. Anytime I start my email off with, "You may not thank me for this referral if you accept it.", he knows that the person or the horse has issues and it's not going to hurt our relationship if he's not able to accommodate the customer.

I meant to add, my current farrier who's been with me for several years now, also gave me the talk when I was booking my horses for the first time. He told me straight out that if I had problem horses, crazy horses or horses that were dangerous, he would literally drop the hoof and walk away and get in his truck and leave. I don't blame him at all for that and appreciate that we're both on the same page.
 

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Please don’t go back. You’re going to get hurt. That was one of the first things I worked on with the horse I was training was to be good when handled by farriers and vets. Its not hard, it takes some effort initially but its worth it. Too many people own horses and have no idea what they are doing, its scary.
 

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Yeah, that's unacceptable. Farriers and vets should not have to deal with horses that have no manners, sorry. A rescue, rehab, maybe occasionally, but only if they know what they're getting into. And are getting paid extra! Sorry, just no. Owners need to take some responsibility. Even the horse I BOUGHT from my trimmer who had terrible manners when getting trimmed gets corrected if he doesn't hold still for her. I am at his head the whole time keeping him from leaning on her. That job is hard enough without having to deal with a horse that can't stand still.
 
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