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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So in the next few months we’ll be getting a horse at our own farm and I am not quite sure how to feed. Should we put a whole round bale in the pasture with the horse? Or throw handfuls of hay over few times a day? Or use feeding nets? Also is it necessary to give them certain kinds of feed or supplements as well? We don’t have a pasture set up yet so I was thinking we could section off one part as a feeding spot with the hay bale in that section? I need some advice and opinions!
 

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It all depends on the horse. How old is the horse? How easy a keeper is it? Do you have lots of pasture grass? I have 11 horses that all require different things. One stays fat on pasture and has free choice round bale and is 11yrs old, gets no grain. Where I have a 20yr old who gets grain, hay, pasture grass, and a joint supplement. Then I also have a 33yr old that gets his nutrition from grain alone thats soaked due to him no longer having his back teeth to chew grass and hay.
 

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There are several ways to handle feeding, and it kinda just depends on your horse and your setup. What kind of horse? Is it a hard or an easy keeper? How heavy is the workload? Will you just be feeding hay? Has a feed test been done on the hay? Some places are deficient minerals in the soil and it will affect feed quality, so your horse could need supplements. Will your horse be kept just in the pasture, or will there be stall time? I like the use of round bales for free-choice feeding as long as the horse isn't eating more than they're working off and getting too fat. If that happens you can always try something else, like smaller amounts in a slow-feed net or separating the horse from the area where the bale is for a period of time each day. Our fatties get turned out on grassy pasture during the day, then kept on dry pasture overnight. During the winter they have free-choice clean, not-super-high-quality hay in a feeder and get fed good hay morning and night. Have fun with your new pony when you get it! It's such a wonderful feeling to have them right there at home. <3
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Well I don’t have a horse yet but it would either be a thoroughbred or quarter horse under the age of 12. I would be riding regularly on trails and fields and hope to eventually get into jumping or barrels. I’m more so worried about the winter months we get lots of snow so I was thinking of just putting a whole round bale in? We had horses a few years ago and our neighbour told us not to put a whole bale in and recommend to throw hay over the fence three times a day and then on top of that I was giving them a cup and a half of a specific feed they needed but I found that wasn’t as effective near spring my quarter horse was getting on the thin side but once the snow melted and pasture grew in we stopped giving hay and kept to their feed and they had pasture 24/7 they fattened up fast which was a relief
 

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If you get a TB be prepared for maintenance, it'll most likely need grain, hay, and pasture. A Quarter horse is more of an easy keeper. My quarter horse is fine on just pasture. In winter months we give them a round bale. If its only one horse you might need a hay net or grazing muzzle if the horse tries to over eat and gains lots of weight. Once you start jumping and barrel racing, then I'd add grain for extra nutrient.
 

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I agree with the post above, thoroughbreds need a lot of food, my 13 year old thoroughbred eats more food then my trainers 7 year old warmblood and still struggles with his weight! I feed my horse 2 biscuits of hay in the morning then he gets hard feed at night. It really just depends on the horse
 
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