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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My mare has bed sores on her hocks and I can't get them to go away. Vet suggested more stall mats in her run, which I did. I tried hock boots specially made for hock sores and she ripped them off in about 3 minutes. I tried duct tape and I can't get it to stay on. So is there another way to heal these up? Wound ointments don't seem to help although I keep trying. Any suggestions? Would vet wrap over wound dressing work? What brand of duct tape might stick?
 

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When I get a horse with this problem, I use dressings made for humans. Optifoam, held on with vetwrap helps.

Is there any more you can do to pad his living area? Mats won't be much cushion. The pressure will translate through to his hocks easily.

Do other horses where yours is develop pressure sores?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
When I get a horse with this problem, I use dressings made for humans. Optifoam, held on with vetwrap helps.

Is there any more you can do to pad his living area? Mats won't be much cushion. The pressure will translate through to his hocks easily.

Do other horses where yours is develop pressure sores?
Yes, it's a sandy/rocky soil and a lot of horses develop pastern and hock sores. I will try the optifoam. I was worried that wrapping her hocks in vet wrap would constrict her hocks and make it worse.
 

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Yes, it's a sandy/rocky soil and a lot of horses develop pastern and hock sores. I will try the optifoam. I was worried that wrapping her hocks in vet wrap would constrict her hocks and make it worse.
Yeah. You don't want to wrap as tight as those technicians who draw your blood do. It's like they are doing a second tourniquet! But you can do a sort of figure 8 wrap that isn't terribly tight.
 

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Hock and elbow sores come about from laying on hard ground so, the answer is to give a deeper bedding.

Rubber mats are goodmand fine but they are still hard.

Give her an area that has a lot softer area where she can lie down and roll. This can be straw, shavings or and this is what I would use, bark peelings especially if outside. This needs to be several inches deep.

The reason I suggest bark is because it weathers better outside, it absorbs urine well so no need to remove the wet on a daily basis.

Some years ago I was course building when the ground was very hard. Bark had been used in an outside arena and as it was beginning to break down afterma long heavy useage, and had been piled to one side. I carted this to the jump arena and placed it on the landing side ofmeach fence for a softer landing.

When the horses were turned back out in that area you would see them all lying down on these heaps of bark. They knew where they were more comfortable! .
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Hock and elbow sores come about from laying on hard ground so, the answer is to give a deeper bedding.

Rubber mats are goodmand fine but they are still hard.

Give her an area that has a lot softer area where she can lie down and roll. This can be straw, shavings or and this is what I would use, bark peelings especially if outside. This needs to be several inches deep.
The problem is she's outside most of the time and it will probably just blow away. If she were inside I would put lots of bedding down but that won't work in her run, hence the rubber mats. Where would I buy shredded bark? Will it blow away like shavings do?
 

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You can get shredded bark from landscaping places. It doesn't tend to blow away like shavings.

You may need to watch to see if your horse wants to eat them. A grazing muzzle would stop that.

I agree with fox hunter. The only real fix is to pad that run.
 

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Is there an area you could box off to put down shavings where they won't blow away?

I've used duct tape but I much prefer just bedding the stall.
 

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Only other thing I can think might slow her down destroying is a neck cradle cause she won't be able to bend around to grab and yank/tear at the dressings.
If you can't dump in about 6" deep of soft sand for her to lie down on over the entire area...
Then putting down a few inches thick layer of bark is probably where you are going to need to go.
Bark shreds and ground trees are not going to blow away unless you have winds in excessive mph for sustained times.
Its ground covering landscapers use all the time..ever see it all over sidewalks after put down...I don't.
I don't see just doing a small location but the entire paddock area otherwise she may exercise her option of laying on the hard ground again worsening the condition.
You need to take away her choice, lie down sure..but it will be on softer ground.

By me, tree removal companies give away by the truckload ground up residue...
What you must be concerned with is no trees were in this load that could hurt the horse...
RED MAPLE, OAK, BOX ELDER, CHOKECHERRY and BLACK WALNUT are all lethal.
Those companies know what kind of tree work they just completed, so they know if safe a load or not.
Sap will be something you will contend with on her coat from fresh ground no doubt about it.
And so is possible skin reaction to sap and woods of a tree species, aka allergic reaction.
And a concern for sharp pieces impaling her as she gets up or down, stuck in a hoof between shoe and sole or piercing a sole is true shards are present.
Much to think about...
Think I might try a neck cradle first...
:runninghorse2:...
 

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The problem is she's outside most of the time and it will probably just blow away. If she were inside I would put lots of bedding down but that won't work in her run, hence the rubber mats. Where would I buy shredded bark? Will it blow away like shavings do?

If you have a lumber yard around they would probably have some.

It is heavier than shavings and will not blow away.

Of all the bedding I have tries and that is most of them, I would use the bark peelings every time. I always bedded very deep, at least a foot. The bark could be left without removing the pee places for at least two weeks, it was never wet on the top and never gave off the ammonia smell when removed.

Give them a soft area and they will use it every time.

Unless you are experi need in bandaging places like hocks you can domway more damage than good. The point of the hock should NEVER be strapped over. Also, I would say if a hock ismbandaged then the horse should be confined as the risk of the bandage slipping down, adding more pressure to the point of the hock is to great.
 
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