The Horse Forum banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
99 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was at a horse show this summer and this woman was riding a beautiful Arabian with the shiniest coat I had ever seen. We started chatting and I asked her what sort of shampoo/conditioner/magic potion she used on her horse for such a shiny coat. She told me that she never uses any special soaps, etc and that it was all due to his feed. She says she feeds him a 10/6 horse feed. Does it really come down to the feed for a horse to have a shiny coat?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,541 Posts
Does it really come down to the feed for a horse to have a shiny coat?
"It soitanly does, Ollie" :)

The Arab on the left was 25 and the TWH wearing the grazing muzzle was 23-1/2, when this was taken on 05-26-11.

The TWH has Equine Metabolic Syndrome, a/k/a "Peripheal Cushings Disease".

One might expect both of these Mid-20's fellas to look like crap. Proper diet goes a long long way.


This pic was taken the same day. This horse is 16 and insulin resistant; he might also be expected to look crappy.


The fourth horse, directly in frontof this fella, has an equally glowing coat.

No one gets bagged feed or grains of any sort. I hand mix everything because of the metabolic issues and because of the two seniors. That gives me the ability to adjust rations and or dosages of something, if I need to.

I also get my hay tested so I know where the mineral deficiencies might be:)

I don't do anything arbitrarily, just because someone thinks "Product A" should be the popular flavor of the month. Each of my horses is treated/fed individually, according to their own personal needs.

The vet was just here to grind points off two back teeth my 24 yr old TWH. With no prompting from me, he shook his head an commented three times how great everyone looked - even their winter coats glisten under the lights and in the sun.

Yes it is a LOT of work:-|
 
  • Like
Reactions: lacyloo

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,405 Posts
Some things to look for in supplements are Omega-3 and 6 fatty acids:) I've heard Nu-Image is good, as well as SmartShine and Glänzen

Best of luck to ye!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,021 Posts
I give my horse Curragh Carron Oil in his feed once a day, I know people who swear by it, and people have stopped me while out hacking and complimented on his coat.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22,320 Posts
Yes, a healthy shine comes from the inside out. You can't have a healthy coat without a healthy body.

Beyond that, the best thing that you can do is never shampoo. Shampooing strips the natural oils out of the coat and makes it look dull and fuzzy.

These horses are turned out to pasture and therefore, seldom groomed. Never bathed and never blanketed...






 

·
Registered
Joined
·
99 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Where is a good starting point for me to learn about mixing my own feed? And thanks for everyone's responses :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,541 Posts
If you Google "understanding horse nutrition", you will get a lot of hits. Some credible, others not-so-much.

"My Horse University" thru Michigan State Unitiversity, has a great on-line nutrition course but I don't know if one has to pay money to enroll.

I had help from three equine nutritionist when my senior TWH was diagnosed with EMS. From there I just started researching and sorting out what made sense and what didn't; not always easy:-(

None of my horses get grain because two are metabolic and its easier to keep everyone on that same base diet. The two healthy horses don't do anything anyway - lol

The area we live in and my horses' living conditions also play a huge part in what goes into their feed pans:)

Our soil is very high in iron for example; not good for metabolic horses as iron over-rides copper and zinc. Along with being necessary for healthy immune systems, metabolic horses need copper and zinc to help stabilize their insulin.

Even though I recognize the copper/zinc shortfall, I still asked my vet if the amount in the vit/min supplement I feed would be sufficient; I don't like upsetting the mineral balance because I "think" something:)

Horses in hard work/training can handle grain because they burn it all up. By hard work, I mean eventers, reiners, ranch horses that are working cattle all day long, etc.

In this day and age of pollution and mineral deficiencies in the soil, every horse can benefit from a quality vitamin/mineral supplement or a quality ration balancer which comes with vitamins/minerals added in.

A bag of vitamins & minerals, and ration balancers are not for horses that eat bagged feed; they are meant for horses that eat only grass and hay as supplements.

If your vet is easy to talk to, I would ask for a recommendation of an equine nutritionist. It has been my experience that nutritionists from feed companies don't listen to everything you say. They are only interested in selling you one of their products, whether it's the right thing or not and that really gets my eye twitching - lol

Hope this helps:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
264 Posts
While nutrition is vital to growing a beautiful coat grooming is part of the equation. I worked for a veterinarian who swore by "rubbing your horse." In his showing days the trainer he showed with was known for the shiny coats his horses had. While he gave them good nutrition he didn't feed anything specifically to promote a shiny coat, instead he had his horses rubbed down thoroughly with baby blankets twice a day everyday to bring the natural oils in the skin into the horse's hair, he also kept shampoo at a minimum. Last year I tried rubbing my horse with a towel each day, I didn't change anything else, and he had the shiniest and softest coat he's ever grown.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
99 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
While nutrition is vital to growing a beautiful coat grooming is part of the equation. I worked for a veterinarian who swore by "rubbing your horse." In his showing days the trainer he showed with was known for the shiny coats his horses had. While he gave them good nutrition he didn't feed anything specifically to promote a shiny coat, instead he had his horses rubbed down thoroughly with baby blankets twice a day everyday to bring the natural oils in the skin into the horse's hair, he also kept shampoo at a minimum. Last year I tried rubbing my horse with a towel each day, I didn't change anything else, and he had the shiniest and softest coat he's ever grown.
I will certainly try the towel thing. I'm sure the horses will love it too. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
582 Posts
For the last few months per my chiro/accupunture vet treating both my horses I am feeding 45% barley,45% rolled oats, 10% cracked corn and lastly 1/4 cup flax seeds.

Just wonder your thoughts on this blend and if anyone here feeds anything similiar to this? He says they will not overeat on it and can have as much as they will eat in 15-20 minutes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
99 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
For the last few months per my chiro/accupunture vet treating both my horses I am feeding 45% barley,45% rolled oats, 10% cracked corn and lastly 1/4 cup flax seeds.

Just wonder your thoughts on this blend and if anyone here feeds anything similiar to this? He says they will not overeat on it and can have as much as they will eat in 15-20 minutes.
Where do you pick up bulk items like that? I think one feed store in another town carries those items but not 100% sure.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22,320 Posts
Honestly, I don't think it really matters what you feed them, so long as it is good horse quality food. The horses that I pictured are fed grass hay only along with free choice mineral block (though they may have been getting alfalfa at the time, I can't be sure). Either way, they look the same on grass as they did on alfalfa because it is just good quality feed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
99 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Honestly, I don't think it really matters what you feed them, so long as it is good horse quality food. The horses that I pictured are fed grass hay only along with free choice mineral block (though they may have been getting alfalfa at the time, I can't be sure). Either way, they look the same on grass as they did on alfalfa because it is just good quality feed.
They are gorgeous animals, for sure!
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top