The Horse Forum banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 20 of 113 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
120 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have been aroound horses my whole life, and ridden my whole life. but i only have started to really get into horses and really start to learn about 3 years ago. i am 13 now, and can learn faster and easier now. but anyway, i have a cousin who just got interested in horses. she never really liked them because one killed her dog. (all the dogs fault really but never mind that)
she is a real beginner, and i want to help her with her horse. ...but i dont know how... she just turned 10 BTW. do you know any good ways for me to help her with this? her horse is a dapple quarter horse thats 14. he has very bad thresh so he cant canter or trot at all, but i figured we wouldnt start with that, lol.
do you know any good training techiques for begginers, so i could teach her?
-Petlover
 
  • Like
Reactions: LyraFreedom

·
Registered
Joined
·
120 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
Any one? ;D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
120 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
It's probably best to get a qualified riding instructor because no offence meant at all but if you don't know where to start your not the right person to teach her.
Who bought her a horse if she can't ride?


Sent from Petguide.com Free App
I found that quite rude.

She got a horse for her birthday.
And she wants to know how to ride.
Everyone has to start at one point or another.
And teachers, well that can't just go off and teach! They have to learn the right way to do it.
 
  • Like
Reactions: LyraFreedom

·
Registered
Joined
·
120 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
You need to get the thrush under control before you do anything with this horse since it's apparently lame.

I agree on having an instructor teach her. Even once every other week is better than nothing.

Yeh, we are trying with the thrush.
He isn't exactaly lame, just is sore after a ride soonetimes, and can't trot hard or canter.

What is they can't pay for an instructor???
That's why I was asking about it. :)

Thanx guys.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
199 Posts
I don't think they were being rude, just real with you, I've been riding for 2 years and I absolutely am not ready for my own horse.
Has any adult got horse experience around you ? Such as parents, aunts/uncles? If so, let them help you guys, if not.. Well, I wouldn't ride the horse until the thrush is better, but start of with basics, rein aids, leg aids, balancing in the saddle, walking, halting, etc etc, depending on if you ride western or English the commands will differ but yeah, that's it.

Also, teach her how to take care of her horse, this is what I would start of with actually, grooming, tacking up, and all that.

Good luck :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
899 Posts
Yeh, we are trying with the thrush.
He isn't exactaly lame, just is sore after a ride soonetimes, and can't trot hard or canter.

What is they can't pay for an instructor???
That's why I was asking about it. :)

Thanx guys.
I don't think anyone was rude or insulting, but to ask why she got a horse before she could ride is a fair question Thr posters were just looking out for all three of you ( including the horse). The response regarding an instructor was also fair as you made no mention of finances in your post and one would naturally assume that probably isn't an issue since she can afford the upkeep of a horse
I personally thought they were simply trying to help based on the information you gave .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
941 Posts
Rude? You asked a question and got an answer..... welcome to the world of big folks. At 13 you have no business taking on the role of instructor. Esspecially if you cant take a little bit of advice you dont like. Folks are killed by horses every day.

My assumption is that someone taught you to ride..... where is that person? I would say your cousins first lessons should be in the care and maintenance of her horse and vetting comfortable around her horse. Once the thrush is cleared up she MIGHT be ready to start riding.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
89 Posts
Gosh, a 13 yr old wanting to teach a 10 yr old to ride? Not a good idea. No offence but you're 13 and you've been around horses your "whole life"...which is no time at all. I'm ancient - 48 yrs old - and I bought my first horse 15 mths ago. I learnt to ride and care for horses during my teenage years. I saved up pocket money, I got jobs and I paid for a professional riding instructor to teach me. Not just riding but safety around horses, correct use and care of tack and equipment, tacking up, feeding, rugging, etc etc.

I'm still learning and I probably won't stop. Horses are a great teacher but the handler really has to have their wits about them when they're still a novice. That means horse handling under adult supervision in my opinion.

Horses are expensive. If there is no room in the parent's budget for lessons, I wonder why they purchased a horse for their child in the first place? This isn't being rude, but it seems a little short-sighted to me.

I would not be working this horse until the thrush has been remedied. It's a pretty painful infection in the hoof that can make the horse lame in the long term. Has a vet been out to prescribe a course of treatment as yet? If not, I'd strongly suggest that happens, and the sooner the better. Also, any infection can weaken the hoof's structures over time, which leads to all sorts of issues for the horse and can also mean permanent lameness.

Best of luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts
I found that quite rude.

She got a horse for her birthday.
And she wants to know how to ride.
Everyone has to start at one point or another.
And teachers, well that can't just go off and teach! They have to learn the right way to do it.
I'm sorry you thought I was being rude but I wasn't. Maybe a bit blunt with you about the situation yes. If she can't afford an instructor then she shouldn't have a horse end of.... What happens if the vet needs to be called out in an emergency??? Horses are expensive to keep and the fact that she is even riding it when it's suffering from thrush is very very cruel in itself. The infection could flare up into full blown canker if she isn't careful and that would result in a vet bill of at least £1000. Her parents are irresponsible for thinking she can take care of a horse and your poor knowledge of horse care yourself makes you a terrible instructor for her and I feel sorry for the poor horse.

Yes this was probably quite rude but you need to see sense!!


Sent from Petguide.com Free App
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
120 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Thanx guys :)
You all really helped.
Sorry if i was being rude :/
I had a bad day yesterday.
You all were very helpful and I thank you for it! :p
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49,245 Posts
I think a 13 year old can teach a 10 year old. I learned a LOT from my older sister, who has only 3 years on me. You are not saying that you are going to take the place of an instructor, only that in what ever capascity you can, you wish to help your cousin. Bully for you!

Just keep in mind that you ARENT an instructor, so stick with what you really know well, and stay very, very basic, so that your cousin can benefit.

like someone said, horse handling skills , reading horse body language, correct and safe leading, backing, mounting.

Watch your cousin ride (when the horse is READY, though) and take note of what she might need help with. Just have her walk. a TON can be done at a walk.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
120 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
I think a 13 year old can teach a 10 year old. I learned a LOT from my older sister, who has only 3 years on me. You are not saying that you are going to take the place of an instructor, only that in what ever capascity you can, you wish to help your cousin. Bully for you!

Just keep in mind that you ARENT an instructor, so stick with what you really know well, and stay very, very basic, so that your cousin can benefit.

like someone said, horse handling skills , reading horse body language, correct and safe leading, backing, mounting.

Watch your cousin ride (when the horse is READY, though) and take note of what she might need help with. Just have her walk. a TON can be done at a walk.
EXACTALY!!!! Thank you!
Ok I will start slow, once her horse is better :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
120 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
Gosh, a 13 yr old wanting to teach a 10 yr old to ride? Not a good idea. No offence but you're 13 and you've been around horses your "whole life"...which is no time at all. I'm ancient - 48 yrs old - and I bought my first horse 15 mths ago. I learnt to ride and care for horses during my teenage years. I saved up pocket money, I got jobs and I paid for a professional riding instructor to teach me. Not just riding but safety around horses, correct use and care of tack and equipment, tacking up, feeding, rugging, etc etc.

I'm still learning and I probably won't stop. Horses are a great teacher but the handler really has to have their wits about them when they're still a novice. That means horse handling under adult supervision in my opinion.

Horses are expensive. If there is no room in the parent's budget for lessons, I wonder why they purchased a horse for their child in the first place? This isn't being rude, but it seems a little short-sighted to me.

I would not be working this horse until the thrush has been remedied. It's a pretty painful infection in the hoof that can make the horse lame in the long term. Has a vet been out to prescribe a course of treatment as yet? If not, I'd strongly suggest that happens, and the sooner the better. Also, any infection can weaken the hoof's structures over time, which leads to all sorts of issues for the horse and can also mean permanent lameness.

Best of luck.
Thank you for your reccomendations :)

Just saying, a 14 year old could know more about Horses than a 50 year old. It just depends what you know and what you do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
811 Posts
If you want to give her some pointers on her riding or show her how to pick out hooves and muck stalls properly or whatever, okay. I think by enough people have said it so that you realize that you (no matter how much you know, even if you do know a lot) cannot take the place of a qualified instructor.

As far as her parents giving her a horse for her birthday and not budgeting for things like lessons, I'm missing the logic there. However, I'm sure something can be arranged. Do you take lessons? Who taught you to ride? Could that person teach her in exchange for work at the barn, etc?

I would say, when showing her how to do things, try not to be condescending or a know it all. You're probably going to have to be quite patient and have to show her things again and again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,228 Posts
I'm a little confused about why your cousin can afford a horse, but not lessons? The latter is far less expensive!

Like many have said, definitely seek out a trainer. Get that thrush taken care of. He really shouldn't be ridden until it is....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
Maybe a good place to start would be to let her ride behind you while she is clearing up the thrush. She can get a feel for the balance and movement of a horse that way, and develop some confidence.
Just don't try that if you are not sure it can be done safely. A bad wreck would probably turn her off to horses for good.

And FYI to the rest of you, there are horses out there for next to nothing. That is what my signature is about. I watch people get hurt, horses get ruined, and every winter I see horses starve because the market is so depressed that a kid can go out and buy a horse for a couple weeks allowance or less.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
330 Posts
As far as thrush goes, have her put apple cider vinegar in a spray bottle and spray it on 1-2 times daily. It should help it heal. TBH I wouldn't ride at all if thrush is causing pain, but that's just me.

As far as helping her, first she needs to gain balance on a horse. It's not as easy as it sounds or looks. I learned balance best bareback at a walk, with someone leading my horse. You could definitely do that. After she is comfortable with that, lunge her in a circle around you (turning is the hardest part!) and eventually have her do it with her hands straight out to her side.
Are you teaching her English or Western. If English you can show her how to post, while at a walk until she picks it up. You can even teach posting if she's Western. I actually like to post in my western saddle. It makes a trot a lot easier on my bum. Good luck with your cousin! And let us know how you are doing.
 
1 - 20 of 113 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top