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They tuck them up where you can't easily see them. They've typically dropped outside the body cavity by birth and then within the first few weeks they pull them close where they may or may not be palpable and are not visible as there is a spot to pull them into that isn't in the scrotum.
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
Have been breeding horses for 40+ years and can find no good reason to leave testicles on a colt that is not breeding quality.
I'm not debating that at all, the colt will be gelded. My question is, isn't it better to wait a bit more for development since hormones in all animals play a big big role on healthy growth?

He won't be bred of course, and as with all my dogs that are not neutered (and non of them will reproduce because they are not quality dogs lol, I'm a purebred snob) I can manage him until the day he will be gelded.
 

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Accidents happen. Horses get loose. That drive to breed is strong. Gelding earlier does not have any negative growth impacts. Depending on his genetic makeup he may end up taller rather than more heavily muscled but you aren't losing anything gelding him now. Let me pull a photo of a father and son. Son was gelded at 2 months.
Working animal Tree Fawn Terrestrial animal Pack animal

Not much difference. Son was the only I've ever gelded that early. He's also the most stallion like in expected attitudes and behaviors. As much muscle as dad and a couple inches taller now that he's finished and matured.
 

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Gelding early has never seemed to "stunt" growth in mine. Why deal with hormones on a non breeding colt when you don't have to? He may be fine today and get hormones over night.
 

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I think people get all worked up too easy over this topic. I have known folks that have tried to stand yearlings, and 2 year olds, and they can't get the job done. They are just babies!
My family bred and raised horses over 100 years. We always ran our colts out until early spring of their 2 year old year and didn't have problems. We gelded when we got them in to brand in the early spring of their 2 year old year.
 
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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
Where I live most people geld at 2 -3 years old and consider it bad to do it earlier (that's why I'm asking and also because it made sense to wait for the colt to develop). I don't want a stallion even though all the stallions I know are amazing and well behaved (we have 3 from the neighbour we let him have some of his horses here to pasture). But I don't want to ride a stallion even if my mare might behave as bad as any bad behaved horse hahaha.

This colt is my next trail riding prospect and I need him to be energetic when working but chill when I ask. We started his training as soon as I got him at 6 months old and looks perfect at the moment.

I don't care if he's more muscular looking at the end or else but to know it's good to his health overall (genetics play a really big part on that in any species). I can have him off the mares if it's better for his health to wait. Or do it now if it's also better. He won't be bred (at least not intentionally // here we have the problem that random people ask for stallions they like for looks and just bring the mare. That's something my neighbour does every time).

Thanks Everyone for sharing your experiencie with me ❤.

I will start the process of independence next week :)
 

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I think people get all worked up too easy over this topic. I have known folks that have tried to stand yearlings, and 2 year olds, and they can't get the job done. They are just babies!
My family bred and raised horses over 100 years. We always ran our colts out until early spring of their 2 year old year and didn't have problems. We gelded when we got them in to brand in the early spring of their 2 year old year.
And I had a yearling draft that my mother in law turned back in with momma and grandma to watch them "play". Ended up with babies. While you may not get worked up and it didn't happen to you, it can happen and it isn't always stellar in results. The OP has momma and momma only. I personally wouldn't take a chance.
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
And I had a yearling draft that my mother in law turned back in with momma and grandma to watch them "play". Ended up with babies. While you may not get worked up and it didn't happen to you, it can happen and it isn't always stellar in results. The OP has momma and momma only. I personally wouldn't take a chance.
We have around 8 mares in our property (not counting feral ones that live on the hills that are around 12), that might make the problem with testosterone worst haha, but again around 3 stallions (5 - 8 years old). All horses are always separated (but foals that are allowed to run around). My colt still isn't used to be on a rope but we are working on it!

We actually have to move all the horses because we don't own them and are from the neighbour we lend him land for his animals!

I'm talking to the vet and we will do the procedure in early september (here we are on autumn, really cold weather).
 

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Oh basically because everyone around (including the vet) suggested to wait a bit for him to grow. We schedulled the procedure for march 2023.

Edit too add: his testicles are not down yet.

I can have him separated from the other mares when seasons come.

Still, isn't it better to wait for the animal to stop growing before this to be done? At least that's what I recommend with dogs (even though a dog can reproduce at 6-8 months). Hormones play a big role in growth and normal functioning.
Horses that are gelded younger actually grow taller than those that are gelded late! The testosterone stops the growth process earlier.
 

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Were those colts running by themselves in a "bachelor" herd or were they allowed to remain with their dams and sisters?
No, they were just typical kids. They played with each other, as their dams got to where while they were allowed to be in the area where they were, they were not allowed to play with them at all. LOL broodmares don't have much of a sense of humor. Imagine a group of boys around 10 years old. They wanted to rough house and be rowdy, but the dams were "get away from me, do it NOW".
 

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And I had a yearling draft that my mother in law turned back in with momma and grandma to watch them "play". Ended up with babies. While you may not get worked up and it didn't happen to you, it can happen and it isn't always stellar in results. The OP has momma and momma only. I personally wouldn't take a chance.
I have heard of cases such as this, but I have to admit, in over 40 years of breeding, I never saw an actual documented case of a yearling breeding. A yearling has the mentality of about a 6 year old human. They are babies.
Like I said,I have heard of such cases, but so far, not one was proven to be true.
 
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Horses that are gelded younger actually grow taller than those that are gelded late! The testosterone stops the growth process earlier.
Another very good reason to not geld them early.
 
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No, they were just typical kids. They played with each other, as their dams got to where while they were allowed to be in the area where they were, they were not allowed to play with them at all. LOL broodmares don't have much of a sense of humor. Imagine a group of boys around 10 years old. They wanted to rough house and be rowdy, but the dams were "get away from me, do it NOW".
As much as I appreciate you taking time out of your day to reply @Zimalia22 , you didn't actually answer my question.

When you raised horses did you house weaned, intact colts with their mothers or sisters? I'm just trying to assess whether your colts actually had opportunities to attempt to breed female horses or if they were kept isolated from their female counterparts.

Yearlings breeding can and does happen. It's not common no, I'd even say it's rare, but I've personally witnessed a yearling breed a fully grown mare. Not only did he breed her, but he overcame great challenges to do so.

Because the yearling in question was a Shetland Pony... and his "partner" was an Arabian! The mare was... uh, "very cooperative" to say the least. I told the owners of those animals what I witnessed, but they found the whole situation highly amusing and basically brushed off my concerns. Eleven months later they had the gall to act shocked when their Arab mare gave birth. Fortunately the resulting filly was surprisingly well put together and had a sweet-natured temperament at that. I hope she went on to make some kids' dreams come true.
 

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I assume your stallions also ran with the herd? That would make a difference or did in my observation of our little herds. Even gelded they weren't tolerated near the mares. This baby was on another property with three mares. He was turned in with one that was sterile and kept two pastures over from the other two. No competition and I don't know how often MIL allowed him to play but foaling dates suggest he was 12 months for one and closer to 14 for the other.
 

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Ok, let me try again.

The colts always ran with the mares and foals. People get all excited and think there's a ton of "unauthorized" breeding going on but they don't take the time to understand the dynamics of a herd situation. Horses are a matriarchal society. meaning, the mares rule with an iron fist. You have alpha mares, beta mares, and zeta mares. Alphas rule, betas are middle of the road, and zetas are the low end of the society. Colts and geldings are allowed to exist on the outer fringes.

That being said, what people are saying by saying that you can't let a colt run with the mares after weaning is the same as a kindergartner not being allowed to be with his female classmates cause he might get them pregnant. Nonsense. Those youngsters, no matter horse or kid, have no clue as to the facts of life. They are kids. They are interested in playing. Like I said, while they may be allowed around their dam the next year, their dams are NOT interested in them. Fillies tend to be different, dam and daughters will typically hang around each other, and an alpha mare will tend to have alpha daughters. You get too many alphas in a herd, and the herd will split and form a new herd of their own daughters, and their daughters.

I remember one year, I had a particular colt, oh what a nuisance! He was making life miserable for EVERYONE. I guess that's what happens when you raise extremely intelligent horses. Anyway, All the horses had run him off, so he decided playing with calves was fun. Not so much for the calf, or it's dam, but he was having a blast! I was SOOOO happy when I got him sold! He went on to have a very successful career as a team penner and sorter. Cowy to the MAX. But dang, in a herd situation, he was a pain. But, back to the talk, as much of a nuisance as he was, he was not interested in mares in a breeding way.

Another reason that you won't be seeing yearlings servicing mares is they are not fertile at that early age. I've watched a few try to stand those yearling colts, and most could not get the colt to get the job done. I talked to one fellow that claimed his colt had gotten the job done, but the mare would not settle to him. So he bred her to an older horse, she took right off the bat. As I said, I have never seen a documented case of a yearling settling a mare.

In all the years I was breeding, I had one catch colt. It was May of this colt's 2 year old year, he should have been cut in Feb. But life has a way of happening. So, we gelded him in May and I saw him out servicing a mare the next day. Yep, she took. So I filed a stud report on the colt, so the resulting foal could be papered. That proved my point to my hubby to not keep putting it off. So in over 40 years of breeding (my own breeding, it was over 100 years for the family), that was my only catch colt. but that was a 2 year old, not a yearling. I can honestly say, I never had any problems with yearlings, ever. They just are not mature enough to get the job done.

People need to remember, they are BABIES! They don't have any clue what the facts of life are. That takes time, and maturity.
 

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That being said, what people are saying by saying that you can't let a colt run with the mares after weaning is the same as a kindergartner not being allowed to be with his female classmates cause he might get them pregnant. Nonsense.
No. Just not your experience. I was guardian for a very troubled teen that had sex with a 12 year old. In the school bathroom. She was 14 had only started her womanhood a couple of months prior. Not regular. Well, 9 months later we were up walking the floors with a baby. Every one matures at their own rate. No matter the species there will be those that mature early and those that mature late. What worked for you won't work for others as the situations are different. You can't ignore the possibility. Especially here in the states in less rural situations where there are few privately managed herds.
 
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