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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Do
  • Take a side profile of your horse.
  • Place your horse's entire body, including its head, at a 90-degree angle to the camera. This, and standing your horse on level ground, will ensure that its proportions appear accurate in the photo.
  • Consider banding, braiding, or combing your horse's mane over if it falls on the left side and is particularly long. This will give the judge a clearer view of the neck.
  • Place your horse in a well-lit, simple setting with little distractions.
  • Fit your horse's entire body in the picture, but make sure your horse isn't so far away that it's hard to see.
  • Be intentional. A candid shot of your horse in the pasture won't follow these guidelines. You want your horse to look its best!


Don't

  • Place your horse in a distracting setting.
  • Include the handler in the photo. Again, it distracts attention away from the horse.
  • Take a picture where your horse has its leg cocked.
  • Put your horse in a halter that's too big or otherwise ill fitted. It looks sloppy and can alter the appearance of your horse's features.
  • Stand your horse on a slope.
  • Take a picture of your horse at an angle--it skews your horse's proportions.
  • Outfit your horse in bell boots or any other kind of tack.
  • Include any other horses in the photo.

Basic list is from - How to Take a Good Conformation Clinic Photo - but I have edited to fit what is needed here.

If anyone wants to post examples of good and bad conformation pictures that they have taken, that would be wonderful, or if anyone has anything else to add to this list. :D:lol:
 

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If anyone wants to post examples of good and bad conformation pictures that they have taken, that would be wonderful, or if anyone has anything else to add to this list. :D:lol:
Here is an example of a bad(but frequently posted) conformation shot.


I have tons of bad, but not a whole lot of good one lol
 

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Here is an example of a bad(but frequently posted) conformation shot.


I have tons of bad, but not a whole lot of good one lol
It's especially hard to get good conformation shots on Appys. Setting them up so that all their spots line up properly is a nightmare...:wink:
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Taking the side picture you need to be even with the middle of the horse and pointing straight at them. You need to have you camera level with their barrel so as to not be to high or to low (distorting up or down)

Example of a side picture.




Example of a rear picture



I need to find my front view of her.


Anyone else have any pictures to add?
 

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I give you pictures of my horses :


This one is a little bit too near the front of the horse, but rather exploitable



On this kind of picture too, you can see lot of things. Having the horse stay on this kind of ground is great help, because you know it's flat.

This last picture of him, without grass and just in front of him, would have been perfect!



This other one :



Is OK.

That :


With a rider on, you can see a lot of things already... But it's not the best way to get an idear...

 

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Also, being slightly off in the angle while taking the picture can make your horse look much different than it actually does. Also shown in these two pictures: the difference squared legs makes. In the first picture, Abby's legs are under her and it throws off her entire shoulder angle.

For example:
In this picture, I am slightly to the right and it makes Abby look like a Dachshund and all out of proportion.


While she does actually have a long back, it's not nearly as awkward when I am standing correctly.


And for a good hind shot, it makes it easier to critique if the tail is either braided like MN's picture or put into a quick knot like this (forgive my tilted angle):
 

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This would be a decent picture if his back legs were even. Those durn Thoroughbreds just never want to stand square! :wink:
Horse Mammal Vertebrate Mare Stallion


This picture of the Claiborne stallion Pulpit is something I see too often: partial side view, legs cut off, only thing really visible being the chest and face.
Horse Mammal Vertebrate Stallion Mane


Obviously over-exaggerated, but you can see how a slant can make a nice horse look wonky:
Horse Mammal Vertebrate Mane Mare
 

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Here is an example of how even a slight change in angle can cause a drastic changein conformation:

Good photo


bad photo
 

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Taking the side picture you need to be even with the middle of the horse and pointing straight at them. You need to have you camera level with their barrel so as to not be to high or to low (distorting up or down)

Example of a side picture.




Example of a rear picture



I need to find my front view of her.


Anyone else have any pictures to add?
Agree the pic needs to be taken dead center of the horse's barrel, but this horse is not set up square on the photo. It's important to get the horse ABSOLUTELY square.....with the front legs straight down from the shoulder, and the back legs with the hocks just below to the point of buttock.
 

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Agree the pic needs to be taken dead center of the horse's barrel, but this horse is not set up square on the photo. It's important to get the horse ABSOLUTELY square.....with the front legs straight down from the shoulder, and the back legs with the hocks just below to the point of buttock.
I disagree, the first photo I posted he is not 100% square but he is stood up perfectly to judge conformation. Infact in the showring in the UK that is how you should stand them when the judge is looking at conformation.
 

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This needs to be stickied! I'm still seeing threads with poor pictures.

Remember that legs need to be shot from the front/rear straight on. I keep seeing a few that are still at a slight angle. Also be sure there's good lighting in the photo and make sure the background doesn't blend into the horse (such as a black horse partially standing in front of a black doorway). Crouching also helps from taking the photo at too high of an angle.

Helpful website too: http://www.equisearch.com/horses_care/health/anatomy/conformation_clinic_photo_120808/

And also when taking a picture of the rear legs, take it from the back of the horse where the tail is viewable. I've seen a few where people stick the camera between the horses front leg so you get a leg/sheath view. The POB is an important reference point that can't be seen unless taken from the rear. Haha.
 
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