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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey there!

I've been widing western for years, but have never been able to actually own my own horse. Recently, I was able to finally buy my first one! She is a very athletic 6 year old Missouri Fox Trotter mare. I am really wanting to do english with her, but like I said, I'm new to this area on horses. I don't know what discipline in english I should show her in.

I really like the thought of doing hunt seat with some jumping. I've heard that saddle seat is better for gaited breeds though. Fox trotters don't have high stepping action, so I'm a bit confused as to which one she would be better for.

Anybody could give me some insight, tips, or anything that might help me out, it would be greatly appreciated :) Thanks!
 

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Saddle seat is the typical english gaited horse disciplen that people use because it is specifically made for gaited horses. It dosen't really matter though. If you like jumping I'd say go for it!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Sunny! Also, would my horse be able to do her soft/fox trot in an equation class, or would she have to do a hard trot? She can do a hard trot, but it is more natural for her to do her gait. I was just wondering.

Is there a certain height that a hunter/jumper should be? She is 15 hands and I was wondering if that was maybe too small? Sorry for all the questions :S I've just always ridden western.
 

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^^ Would you be using the cut-back or jumping saddle?

Cut back = gait.

I think (but am not positive) that standard hunter heighth is 18 inches but I could be wrong.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yeah, I figured she would be way too small, haha.
I think I'll just be sticking to pleasure and equitation (oops, spelt it wrong above) ;)

I don't currently have an english saddle, but am in the process of buying one.
I figured it would be best to get s jumping saddle. What do you think?
 

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^^ It's always best to get a saddle especially made for your needs, but you don't always have to..Close contact and all purpose saddles work fine, but of course, if you are going to be showing, a jumping saddle would be best. DO NOT use the cut-back! lol. It has no support.
 

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Gaits - look up WIKIPEDIA and search for horse gaits. There is a good section which describes the differences between them. In Europe the only real gaited horses are trotters which pace and Icelandics which have an unusual fast walk called a "tolt". Well worth reading.
Saddles. At first buy a "general purpose" saddle which is cut to allow either general hacking, small fence jumping or early stage dressage.
Mostly the difference in types is in the cut of the knee rolls as required by the bend of the knee of the rider's leg.
Height of horse. At junior levels the height of the horse makes no difference rather it is the attitude and aptitude of the horse that counts.
Some small horses jump well naturally with in-born enthusiasm.
In jumping size doesn't matter but technique does.
Start the horse off with modest jumps - as little as 1 foot high and steadily work upwards. Don't over face the novice horse at the beginning.
I suggest you first learn to trot.
Then learn to trot over poles laid on the ground.

Oh and make sure you wear a padded jacket and a good riding hat.

Have fun
B G
 

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I know a 15 hand horse that can jump better than any of the 16 hands in our barn. I say try her out jumping and see if she has the knack for it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks a ton BG! The info you gave me helped quite a bit.
I started working with Charisma (my horse) on trotting on que today.
Like I said, she can trot, it's just more natural for her to fox trot.
I think with some work, we'll be able to get it down.
I'm going to start working with a trainer next week. Hopefully she'll be able to help with her training too.
I think we're going to try this out :)
 

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^^ You're teaching your gaited horse to trot? Not a good idea. Believe me. For many reasons.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Yeah, I've been thinking about that the last couple hours.... >.>
I would do saddle seat, but I'm afraid that we wouldn't compete very well because fox trotters are not high-stepping horses.
Meh.... any ideas??
 
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