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I don't know much about hyper mobility in horses, but I have heard that it is becoming an increasing issue especially in Warmbloods bred for dressage. Does anyone have any more information or insight on this?
 

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I am not familiar with this issue so I googled it and found this article. I’m sure there are other credible articles.


QUOTE:
In the past 20-30 years our beloved horse has developed into a tall, elegant, long legged, supple, long lined, spectacular moving machine. This has been possible by strategic breeding, selecting horses that exhibited the characteristics mentioned above. Our horses have turned into elastic athletes who are capable of doing spectacular half passes and extended trot. But what does this actually mean for the horse?
END QUOTE

It seems we humans are forever hael-bent on destroying what we love for the sake of trophies, ribbons, and accolades — shame on us ——
 

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I guess you can chalk that up with breeding QH with feet too small to support their weight, Arabs with faces so dished they can't breathe properly, race horses to leggy their pasterns collapse, minis so small , with dwarfism, they are very unhealthy, etc, etc,
 

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I think there is a theory that HERDA in Quarter Horses makes the horses super flexible (with only one copy of the gene) and that is why they are such great athletes and thus the disease continues to be perpetuated especially in cutting lines......

I am unable to relocate where I read that though. But basically what makes the skin fall apart with two copies of the gene may give the horse an athletic advantage with only one copy of the gene. I don't know if that's actually true though, or just a theory. (And nothing to do with dressage I guess, sorry!).
 

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Although not always, hypermobility can be an early sign of DSLD (degenerative suspensory ligament desmitis), which is thought to be a genetic condition affecting all connective tissues in the body. Widely spreading among all different breeds. Speaking as someone who has a horse with DSLD, it is a pretty devastating disease to have any horse go through, especially those with early onset.

Besides that, hypermobility can be tough on the ligaments, tendons and joints, as mentioned in the article walkinthewalk has posted. It can predispose a horse to injuries and certainly is not the ideal for longevity.
 

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I was trying to find the videos I've seen of Tennessee Walking horses with hypermobile tendons in the hind legs. Supposedly this makes Big Lick gaiting possible. I've read there is a related very high incidence of locking stifles and other stifle and hock issues related to this.

Someone not long ago posted a video on the forum of a young horse with lax tendons and hind legs that bowed out frequently (TWH). Most who saw the video described her as lame.
 

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I consider any sort of hypermobility to be related to DSLD. The fetlocks sink towards the ground or may touch the ground during movement. These pictures are cropped because the images aren't mine, just pictures from around the internet. I'm not certain any of these horses are clinically normal.
 

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I don't know much about hyper mobility in horses, but I have heard that it is becoming an increasing issue especially in Warmbloods bred for dressage. Does anyone have any more information or insight on this?
I spoke to a vet I found on Greatvet - greatvet.com regarding hypermobility in horses and this is what I understood - It’s caused by an increased elasticity of the connective tissue, hypermobile horses don’t usually reach 15 years of age. It can be easily recognized in horses by increased movement possibilities of his four legs, neck, and back. Also, to lessen the pain, Glucosamine and NSAID Firocoxib will work, and try Bowen therapy that works wonders. However, permanent retirement with physical therapy is what most vets recommended.I am sure you can find the nearest animal hospital to get a second opinion as well. There are online portals where you can reach out to the vets. I have mentioned greatvet as I have used it but I am sure you can find others as well.
 
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