The Horse Forum banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 20 of 44 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,010 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I bought a colt at a silent auction. Now, this isn't a standard sized colt. No, he's a miniature from a huge breeding farm. Mistake 1! Mistake 2, I didn't really get a good look at him from behind, but he's cow hocked. My mistake. But other than that, he seemed like a pretty good citizen. I've been very nice and calm with this horse, and I just can't seem to get through to him.

He's terrible at leading. This is the second day in the row I've taken him back into the barn because he refuses to take another step forward. I've carried a whip to egg him on, and then he just fricking blows into tantrums, rears, gallops around and just generally spazzes.

He's been rearing non stop lately. I've tried all means to get this colt to just freaking chill. I laid him down yesterday, had him nice and relaxed (the most relaxed I've ever seen him!), hooves resting on one another, he almost looked dead. Got him back up and said Hello to Mr. Spazz Attack again. Then I'm over visiting with the other mini, and the little crack head is trying to bite me 8|

What is just absolutely frustrating is that I have three other weanlings; one miniature and two paints - one of the paints is spoiled rotten and had terrible manners, and she NEVER gave me this much trouble. I'm getting out done by a colt that weighs LESS than I do!

At this point, I've gotta get him sold. He doesn't even fit into the breeding program we're starting over with - especially not with his FABULOUS disposition, he causes me undue stress, and I just really do not want to deal with some colt that I can't seem to get through to. The problem is, is that what happens when someone comes to look at him? No one's going to want to buy that!

I'm at a loss, and I'm open to any suggestions anyone might throw out there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,113 Posts
Get a trainer. Poor guy it would be terrible for him to have to move to yet another home because you made a lax judgment when you bought him. Maybe he just needs time to get to know you? Maybe he has little man syndrome? maybe he has been abused? Maybe he is terrified of his new surroundings?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,010 Posts
Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Oh he'll be gelded/sold with a gelding contract, but that's not the root of his problem I don't think. I believe the root of his problem is lack of handling on part of the breeder.

Edit for Add; I am not and WILL not get a trainer for a mini for anything else than driving. He's been here since September, he's had more than plenty of time to adjust. I never even started his 'show halter' training because I wanted to give him time to adjust. Abused? I think not.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,113 Posts
So you are going to sell/geld him over that? Even though you seem to realize that it is a training and not personality issue?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,010 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
His hind legs are CROOKED, he does not deserve his testicles in part of both conformational faults and disposition.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,076 Posts
That sucks! If you sell him, please be sure the new owner is aware of his dangerous behavior.

Other then that... have you worked with him at all? Lunging and teaching basic ground manners such as moving off pressure and backing might instill some respect in him.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,010 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
1dog,etc.; He's a weanling with bad back legs, longing him right now is not a good idea. He's a mini. He's not exactly 'dangerous', while it could still hurt if he 'attacked' the chances of it killing someone are very very very low.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,113 Posts
HEHE, he is a little mini terror!!

Not trying to be petulant, bu in a weanling the legs do often look wonky, they could straighten out as he grows. Not trying to change your mind but I just wanted to add that.
Good luck with him, do you have nay pics? I would like to see this mini terror. lol
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,010 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
No his legs are BAD. They look like this: )( .. LOL That kinda looks like a butt.

Even our farrier gave him a trim to try and help him out but nothing improved. I thought he might grow out of it, but he's definitely not straightening out u__u I don't have great pictures of him, but here's a head shot.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,113 Posts
AWW, he is a cute mini terror! Does not look too vicious in the pic, lol.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,010 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
He was worn out after figuring out clippers didn't kill him, lol
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
957 Posts
Why did you plan on getting him in the first place? Just a "on the spot purchase"?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
296 Posts
Deep down - do you want to get rid of him or do you want to keep him? If you want to get rid of him either give him away to someone who knows his temperment and can use him for something (even a lawn ornament), or sell him accordingly, someone might want him.
I've heard of some people training their babies to lead by somehow tieing them to donkeys. The donkeys apparently be themselves and don't budge and the horse learns that freaking out doesn't work. (I've never done this, but I thought it might be an idea). Also I've known a few people in Bovine 4H (cattle 4H or whatever, not sure what it's exactly called) and to get the calves to learn to be lead they tie them to a quad and teach them that way (again just a suggestion) I would be equally frustrated and deflated by his attitude.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,010 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
I loathe long ears. That's a story in itself.

I am not giving him away. Someone will pay money for him simply because of his breeding.

I bought him because he had an awesome bloodline, one I otherwise would not have been able to afford. He was merely an investment into a breeding program, which he has been deemed unsuitable for.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
191 Posts
Well it sounds like you had your mind made up before you even started this post. Unfortunately, the economy is bad, and nothing is selling. You would be LUCKY to sell this colt for 300 dollars since he is not of breeding standard or handleable. If you are willing to sell him to someone who has no clue about breeding ethics or conformation and you don't care if they breed him, then that's how you are going to get money for him. Really, he needs to be gelded and needs you to not get fed up with him and keep leading him every day until he gets better.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
310 Posts
Hes just a weanling?? and you want to get rid of him because he doesnt know anything or have manners?? horses arent born with manners. Crooked back legs or not, he is capable of learning. It would be very unfair for him to be sold, again... unless he goes to someone who understands his issues completely and is willing to take the time to actually work with him. Its not his fault he has the issues. Sounds like you already had your mind made up before you even posted so I am not sure what you want everyone to tell you?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
886 Posts
i just cant believe you want to start a "breeding program".... when really... you didnt even look well at a candidate for it before buying him.... :-|
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,061 Posts
Just because he hasn't been abused by you, doesn't mean his behavior isn't the result of someone else's mishandling.

As far as his behavior, to be honest, it sounds like he is confused; a horse that rears is a horse that feels he has no other option...most of the time it is just plain confusion.

You said you tap him with the whip to get him to move forward, well, how about getting him to simply yield his hind end, and lunge when he doesn't want to move forward with you? Rather than argue with him to GO forward, why not just have him move his feet? Where doesn't matter, he needs to learn that YOU control his feet, even if he doesn't want to go where you want him to, rather than nag him to go foward, causing him to become further agitated.

For the biting in the pasture, he is probabyl trying to make you get out of his space in the pasture, so carry a crop or lead rope, and when he moves uncomfortably into your space, flick the lead or tap his chest with the crop; teach him when HE is in YOUR space, and that you control that space, not him. Right now, he's comfortable impeding your space, and that needs to be put to rest.

If you do try to rehome him, you need to be upfront in your ad, that he is not for an inexperienced handler, that he has training\respect issues, that need to be dealt with. When I got my girl this fall, her owners were really upfront with her bucking\bolting and confidence issues, so I knew before I got her what I was getting. You didn't know what you are getting when you took him on (it could be he just was never handled enough either), but you HAVE to let potential buyers know what they are getting.
 
1 - 20 of 44 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top