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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
as much as they should. i work at a riding stable and so a lot of customers that want to ride MOST of them, are quite large. our weight limit is 240 and youd be surprised how many 240+ people want to ride. (the obesity in this country has gotten to be rediculous) the weight limit is very very strict - no exceptions. and we have the right horses for heavier people. but it seems like when i go to shows or just seeing people that come out to ride with their own horses on the trails - 70% of them are too big for their horses. theres quite a few older women that have finely built walking horses but the women are 200 lbs and up and they ride for a good 2-3 hours. and girls that are barrel racing but are too heavy for their lighter built QH's. and i also understand that if you only ride like an hour a day - some extra weight is not going to hurt your horse but if youre going to be running and going up and down hills and jumping and doing tight turns and just any sort of physically demanding activity on your horse- am i wrong to think that you should have an appropriately sized horse?
 

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am i wrong to think that you should have an appropriately sized horse?
A fit horse with a good rider, even a large one, is probably having a better experience than the out of shape horse with the beginner who weighs 180lbs.

I do agree that some people have not realized that their size has increased to the point that it might affect their horse.

But I also think that you can not jump to any conclusions simply because of weight.

The weight limit you have excludes lots of not very over weight tall men. You are saying they should not ride at all?
 

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I find your post pretty judgmental and somewhat rude... but I digress, let's just touch on the facts here.

I COMPLETELY agree with what AlwaysBehind posted. A big part of riding is fitness and balance. If a rider is 180lbs/200lbs, and if they are an accomplished rider who knows how to place their mass in the saddle, then I guarantee that horse is going to get a better ride out of it then with a 120lb novice bouncing in and out of the seat. Often I find that plus sized riders are MORE conscious about their weight/mass/placement then lithe riders.

"70% of them are too big for their horses" --> According to who? According to you? You know neither the horse being ridden nor the rider. Give me concrete evidence of the 20% rule being violated, and then maybe I would be a bit more understanding re: this specific comment. Unfortunately, people come in all different sizes, and I don't think it's fair of us to "judge from afar" when we really have no idea what the situation is. Would you insult a Prix St. Georges rider for being 180lbs?

"(the obesity in this country has gotten to be rIdiculous)" -->
I don't disagree. Obesity is definitely an issue across North America, no doubt. I guarantee that most of those people out there would love to be in shape, or at least be carrying a little bit less weight to make their lives a bit easier.


In closing, I am just not a believer in the mantra "people who weigh over 170lbs have to buy/own/ride a draft cross". I DO believe that everyone should make the right decision according to THEIR specific situation - a responsible decision at that. Good bone structure and appropriate length of back should absolutely be taken into consideration when looking for a mount if you are in the higher weight ranges. As well as a myriad of other things, some of which I've touched on above - rider fitness, horse fitness, rider experience, fit of tack, and so on.

I wouldn't mind hearing your answer to what AlwaysBehind asked you. What about men who are taller and of a solid build? Are you saying that they shouldn't have the opportunity to enjoy the sport as much as we do?



Note: For the record, I am in no way saying that weight limits at trail riding stables should not be respected - they are there for a reason I am sure and are appropriate for the mounts that are available for riding. I am just trying to address the tone of the post and am hoping that you can look at it from the other side of the looking glass.



Think about it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
im saying that people who are heavy should have heavy hauler horses for the well being of the horse. i think a lot of the people that come out to ride (the people that bring their own horses) are horse owners and not horsemen. they just think a horse can carry however much weight because they are a horse. and that is not correct. i posted this somewhere else too which is why im not replying to to this post anymore. seeing a 240+ lb woman who cant ride a stick horse on an 800 lb arab breaks my heart.
 

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. seeing a 240+ lb woman who cant ride a stick horse on an 800 lb arab breaks my heart.
How is it any different for those who are lighter, but still have no clue how to really sit a horse? our horses can't talk for themselves, so how do we know that a person 120lbs bouncing around on a horse's back isn't hurting him? You keep going back to the same bias...injury to a horse comes from both sides of the spectrum and it has to do with rider seat and balance, not necessarily weight alone.

Now, back to the topic at hand :wink:
 

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I agree, tho i am 5"7 and 120lb. Dont judge what you dont know.
Meh...I'm 5'5 and 155, but don't look it, as it's pretty much all muscle...:shock: Doesn't seem to matter how much I exercise, I never lose anything, because what 'fat' i have turns to muscle...and of course, muscle is heavier than fat!!!! :lol:
 

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Dead weight is different from live weight. Live weight can work with the horse's body to minimize concussion on the horse's legs. Dead weight is just there. Like your saddle.

However, most horses can carry 20% of their body weight. So a 1,000 lb horse can carry about 200 pounds, saddle included....just a rough estimate taking into account live and dead weight. It also depends a LOT on the horse's bone structure, conformation, breeding, muscling, fitness level....

Also remember that when a horse is over 16hh, their weight carrying ability usually decreases because their hooves are too small for their bodies. They retain the small hooves of a light horse coupled with the large, heavy bodies of draft ancestry.

But yes, I do think it's quite annoying when large riders expect so much from small horses
 

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Yeah I know but there was also like a long thread started by the same person which was the exact topic and everyone had quite a discussion about it, or have I gone offically insane??
 

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She said she posted somewhere else, but I had assumed she meant another forum. Can you find the link? I'd be interested in the outcome.
 
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