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Discussion Starter #1
And done for a long long time.



My new toy (the lens, not camera). I've been wanting a 70-200 f2.8 for years. With Tamrons newest offering the (G2), and lots of reading and watching reviews and comparisons to it and the Nikon (which is $1000+ CDN more), I was sold that to get it.

This will replace 2 of my lens so selling them should eat up most of the cost and will be my main workhorse for equine shows and portraiture. It's big, it's 4lbs but I can't wait to put it to use!

After shooting my second horse show this past weekend, I got tired of all the lens swapping. This lens will save me a lot on the lens swapping. I can go from action, to portraiture and back to action with this one lens because it's such an amazing all round performer for everything.
 

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Very nice, I want one!!!
 
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Thanks. Finally, no more complaining on here from others that my gear is not good enough. It's most definitely is now.

Hoofpic...a nice addition to your equipment. Enjoy it.

As for complaints from those on this forum regarding your choice of equipment...
It is no ones business to tell you what to buy, what the quality of your equipment is or not.
Those are choices that you need to make for your benefit.
How you handle, are able to capture subject matter and what you are able to make those photos speak of is all the person behind the cameras skill.

Please, make sure you don't get dragged into debate with anyone giving you grief about your choices.
With the exception of very few, most here are not professionals.
If you truly want the input of professionals on the quality of equipment, your skills taking photos than go to photography sites, go take classes and work with those whose passion is photography.
We here are horse-lovers....some take cute, nice pictures but with few exceptions I have seen nothing I would of spent a dime for...they were just nice snapshots.
There are some very gifted amateurs who take fabulous images with not top-of-the-line equipment...
If you have skill and a eye you can make great memories.
If you are of average creativity, then you still make great memories.
But it takes a very special combination to make those memories that others want to purchase.

Enjoy what you have purchased because you wanted it, period.
Learn to use it to the best of your ability.
Don't worry so much what others think....
You, are the only one who has to please you.
:runninghorse2:....
jmo...
 

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I'm not sure you can call them complaints when you ask for advice on a public forum and people give it. Sometimes we get advice that's not relevant, that's not what we're looking for, or that we read as a personal insult to our endeavors or skills. It is what it is.

Either way, enjoy your new lens! <3
 

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You, are the only one who has to please you.
:runninghorse2:....
Slightly off topic but that goes for horses too. I learned years ago there will always be someone who doesn't like my choice of breed, my horse's level of training, manners, my tack choices or whatever else they think needs to be changed. After a while you just have to learn to take the advice you want and ignore the rest. Because you can't please all the people all the time. I decided my horse only has to please ME, not them. If I am happy with my breed, my tack, my horse's manners, then it doesn't matter what anyone else thinks. I thought it was worth mentioning. :smile:
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Hoofpic...a nice addition to your equipment. Enjoy it.

As for complaints from those on this forum regarding your choice of equipment...
It is no ones business to tell you what to buy, what the quality of your equipment is or not.
Those are choices that you need to make for your benefit.
How you handle, are able to capture subject matter and what you are able to make those photos speak of is all the person behind the cameras skill.

Please, make sure you don't get dragged into debate with anyone giving you grief about your choices.
With the exception of very few, most here are not professionals.
If you truly want the input of professionals on the quality of equipment, your skills taking photos than go to photography sites, go take classes and work with those whose passion is photography.
We here are horse-lovers....some take cute, nice pictures but with few exceptions I have seen nothing I would of spent a dime for...they were just nice snapshots.
There are some very gifted amateurs who take fabulous images with not top-of-the-line equipment...
If you have skill and a eye you can make great memories.
If you are of average creativity, then you still make great memories.
But it takes a very special combination to make those memories that others want to purchase.

Enjoy what you have purchased because you wanted it, period.
Learn to use it to the best of your ability.
Don't worry so much what others think....
You, are the only one who has to please you.
:runninghorse2:....
jmo...
What others on here have said had no influence on my decision to get it. After 2.5 months of using the 70-300 lens, it didn't take long for me to realize that it's my main shooter for horses. I was very happy with it until I found out how easy it is to get dust inside the lens. So I wanted to go with a weather sealed lens that doesn't have a retractable barrel. Pro lenses can just handle a lot tougher environmental conditions long term and this is a big reason why I upgraded.

This past weekend when shooting my second show, it was when it hit me that I need to think twice on whether or not I have the best lens choices for my needs. After a day of thinking, I realized that I don't. I would be much better off with the 70-200.

The 70-200 f2.8 is the mother of all lenses, it's so popular and in demand by pros for a reason. Because it's such a great lens for everything including portraiture and action.

The biggest drawback of my 70-300 was that I would never use it for portraiture so when I go from shooting action to portraits I would have to change to my prime, the back to the telephoto when I am done. I don't want to be changing lenses at horse shows or barns if I can avoid it. It drove me bonkers this past weekend.

The 70-200 is so good for portraits that I can use it for everything and it will greatly cut back on the amount of times I have to swap lenses. This is a HUGE plus for me.

I do still plan on getting a second DSLR body, but at least now I rarely will have to reach over for another lens.

There are probably only two lenses that I will ever use for horse stuff, and having one on each body would be amazing. I would never have to change lenses ever.

I wanted better glass because I am confident I can take full advantage of it. Look at the shots that I got from the telephoto kit lens, now I am on all Pro glass. I wanted the faster aperture, and a lens that just brings in much more light and is capable handling low light situations when need to be (because we all know I will eventually have those times). Therefore my telephoto kit lens will not cut it and I am not going to use a 85mm prime for shooting horse shows.

That is when I knew I didn't have the right lens for my needs and that the 70-300 kit lens was not a long term solution.

It's not an additional cost for me since I will be selling other lenses that don't suit my needs for this. So I am essentially just swapping gear for much more appropriate gear.
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
What is the range of focus of that lens?
200mm but 300mm on my camera cause crop bodies have 1.5x crop factor.

I am sacrificing 150mm, going from 450mm to 300mm, but it will be a temporary sacrifice as I will be getting a 1.4x teleconvertor down the road. You lose a handful of stops of light when using a TC, but I truly do believe that this is the way to go for my needs. A 70-200 f2.8 with a TC will still bring in significantly more light than my 70-300. So I basically have a low light performer and will change into a telephoto once I put the teleconvertor on.

But for now, yes it sucks giving up the extra 150mm of reach but I will just have to adapt and somehow find ways to get closer to the subject. I definitely will not be able to shoot in tight across full arenas anymore, but again I will adapt and get a 1.4xTC down the road.

70-200 f2.8 with 1.4x teleconvertor
85mm 1.8g Nikon prime.

I'm 100% confident this small kit would exceed my horse photo needs.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I should also mention that this past week I went to hang out and watch with one of the top photographers who shoots the shows Spruce Meadows hosts here in AB and he basically said that I will eventually need a 70-200 f2.8 regardless of me thinking otherwise, it's not if, but when I want to get it.

There are going to be days where I won't have an over abundance of light, so what am I going to do if I don't have the right gear for the situation? Turn down the job? Not good.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Well, you exceeded my knowledge of cameras , right there. I hope you get some great shots.
Thanks.

I will still keep my Sigma 18-35 f1.8 as well.

70-200 f2.8
85mm 1.8
18-35 f1.8

Is going to be a killer trio of pro glass. I need nothing more.
 

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I have a 70-200 myself and when I am playing around with taking photos at shows, it works great.
 
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Discussion Starter #14
I have a 70-200 myself and when I am playing around with taking photos at shows, it works great.
Awesome. I am going to finally put mine to good use this Sunday, shooting a driving event for A.E.F. (first driving event for me so I'm trying to find out how to take good photos of them).
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I put the new lens to the first this yesterday but I don't think it was a legit test since I made errors. I also ordered the Tamron Tap-in console and should be here for Friday as I want to tune the lens with (I do this with all my lenses as I want the best out of it with no back or front focus issues). My lens is slightly off but tuning it will get it perfect.

Shooting indoors is not easy! Shooting mini's is not easy.

I'm not at all surprised but it's a very valuable learning experience for me moving forward. Shooting indoors gives you so many more obstacles to deal with especially when you have inconsistent lighting, hot spots, reflections, not a great choice of backdrops, too many random items in the back, tight framing, etc.

Also shooting mini's is a lot more difficult than I thought especially when they are black with shiny white manes and wear black patches over their eyes with black shiny tack.
 

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Just be glad that zebras are not the "in"thing for everyone to ride indoors ;)

But yes indoors is a huge challenge that will push your gear to the limit in equine. Honestly indoors is when I wish had a top end fullframe camera body with the best ISO performance there is; esp when its a cloudy day and the skylights are not giving much light.

Exposure on dark horses indoors can be a challenge, sometimes you just have to work out the one or two spots that have good lighting and focus on them, ignoring most other areas as whilst you might get a shot the resulting exposure will be a nightmare.



The 70-200mm is also a fantastic workhorse of a lens for this kind of work; indeed 70-200mm tend to fit into nearly everything very easily. The improved optical performance and aperture range are sure to be a great help for you.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Just be glad that zebras are not the "in"thing for everyone to ride indoors ;)

But yes indoors is a huge challenge that will push your gear to the limit in equine. Honestly indoors is when I wish had a top end fullframe camera body with the best ISO performance there is; esp when its a cloudy day and the skylights are not giving much light.

Exposure on dark horses indoors can be a challenge, sometimes you just have to work out the one or two spots that have good lighting and focus on them, ignoring most other areas as whilst you might get a shot the resulting exposure will be a nightmare.



The 70-200mm is also a fantastic workhorse of a lens for this kind of work; indeed 70-200mm tend to fit into nearly everything very easily. The improved optical performance and aperture range are sure to be a great help for you.
Last Sunday in my very first indoor show was a real good challenge and eye opener for sure. I learned a lot from it. It probably couldn't have had anymore barriers to work with, I had everything from cluttered and uninteresting backgrounds, inconsistent lighting, mirrors, reflections, too much misc junk sitting around the arena, black and shiny tack, and of course black minis with white manes with black tack and because it was a driving class, the horses had the eye patches on. Then you factor in just how fast the minis move and it's much harder to shoot them than full sized horses. But I still managed to get them in the pose in terms of catching them in their trot.

Also, I ordered a Tamron Tap-in console last week and got it yesterday. I just spent most of the night calibrating my new lens. It was off and I could tell when shooting with it last Sunday at the show, back and front focusing issues at various FL's. So I tuned it tonight and it's perfect. I've held off in using the lens until I got the tap-in console for me to tune it because I knew something wasn't right with the lens out of the box, it was way off.
 

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Pretty sure he's talking about blinders, greentree.


It's going to be tough for him not knowing the correct terminology if he wants people to think highly enough of him to photo/video their animals. Knowing the sport and athletes is key to getting good stills and action shots. Not knowing the correct names for things comes off as unprofessional and amateurish. People spend a LOT of money on their show horses and tack, and expect a knowledgeable professional when paying for photography.


I've also never seen a black horse with a white mane and tail. Pintos/paints that are black and white of course, but never a solid black horse with a completely white mane/tail.
 
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