The Horse Forum banner
21 - 28 of 28 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
24,112 Posts
Boy, sounds like you're lucky to not have had these type issues in the past... Around here, and with most people I've spoken to, 'reliably unreliable' is a normal 'farriers disease', and being uncommunicative & rude is also quite common.

While not answering calls, forgetting bookings etc, doesn't sound like he's at all professional, do also realise that working with horses, there are always things that happen that can throw out your schedule. So if he's late, I wouldn't necessarily hold that against him. Still, I always tell my clients that I will be there within half an hour max of the time we schedule, or I will ring them.

Oh well, best wishes finding a good farrier soon!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49,544 Posts
I am going out on a limb I should have gone out on earlier in agreeing with @dogpatch ; you should not have texted that email . You should have waited, reread what you typed, or called, or more waiting. I sooooo agree that the use of text and email makes all of us more vulnerable to emotional impulses that we would have curbed in a face to face conversation. It's possible, just possible, that there was some misunderstanding , somewhere, that caused this, and a real conversation, without leading with ann accusation, would have rectified it.

However, I will also say that I am SOOOO likely to text something similar, Thus my agreeing with @dogpatch that it's a dangerously easy way to text yourself right out of a decent working releationship.

in any case, I do wish you the best and if have , like I said, empathy with your very human reaction.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
So, perhaps in conclusion, it would certainly 'behoove' a savvy horse person to educate and empower themselves and become somewhat proficient at trimming their own horses and if you can't find anything nice to say to an 'irregular' farrier, just say thanks anyways and move on confidently with your new-found abilities.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
TrainedByMares has it right. education being the key. Watching a few youtube videos is not education. Take a course from a responsible teacher and continue from there. Don't allow yourself to work in a vacuum after that. Make connections to ride along a day here and there with a local trimmer. every one of us needs to be a lifelong student We're very fortunate in the number of learning opportunities we have now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,873 Posts
I have had the same farrier for 31 years, never a problem. He has taught me how to trim, how to shoe and has been a promoter of my business to his clients. I have 2 other good farrier friends, one has helped me learn to balance hooves and both promote my equine based business to their clients. Then there is a really nice young farrier in my area, whose work just is terrible, but buys all my used farrier tools at asking price. He ain't hard to look at, if I was younger, I would have to teach him a few things. About hoof balance, among other things, lol.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
951 Posts
I would go back to the Amish or try out the new recommendation.

But do note that 24-48hrs to return a text is NORMAL. People have LIVES to live.
A week to return an email is also normal.
They also sleep at night, so usually between 9pm and 8am, don't bother them. Ask them what hours you can contact them and if emergency messages are allowed and if so, what hours.
 

·
Registered
Nico is my darling QH gelding, register name of “Coronas Sadiewood.”
Joined
·
3 Posts
I work as an OR RN but it’s my second career, first I was a farrier. I simply LOVED being a farrier, and the only reason I stopped (now just do my own horses) is because I saw how hard it was on the body. In my 20’s I was looking at my colleagues who were only in their 40’s, but looked and acted like they were in their 90’s.

Reading your posts makes me frustrated on two fronts:

First, it’s sad that the complaints of farriers never change: not showing up, poor communication, and just unprofessional behavior overall. Shoddy work actually seems to be down the list.

When I first started out I was floored at why so many of my clients praised me - I showed up ON TIME, didn’t abuse their horses, and did decent work. To me these should have been givens, not something that makes a good farrier stand out!

Secondly, I’m frustrated that clients would ever expect a farrier to teach them to trim, much less shoe their own horses. I am a professional, I went to a proper farrier school for several months to learn the trade. You would never ask a surgeon to teach you how to do your own surgery, or a dentist to teach you how to make your own crown. I have only been asked once if I could teach someone to trim their miniature ponies because my prices were too high. I was insulted and told them that if they can’t afford to properly care for their ponies then they shouldn’t have them.

However, I think the key difference is the word PROFESSIONAL - if some farriers don’t act like a true professional, then their trade will not be treated as such. Therefore it would make logical sense why a client would expect to just learn how to be a farrier in an hour.

Bottom line, interview prospective farriers. You’re hiring them for a job afterall. Ask their credentials and training. I am not a licensed farrier, but I did go to a proper school. Don’t be afraid if someone learned the trade on a ranch or from their father. Some of the best farriers I know didn’t go to an official trade school, but they apprenticed with master farriers for YEARS before going out in their own.

If you don’t get a call back, easy choice - that one isn’t hired by you. Good farriers who are true professionals are good communicators and businessmen/women.

There were certain areas that I didn’t travel to because they were too far. However, if I got a call from a client in those areas, I always called them back to communicate this and when possible recommend someone who did travel to their area. I also did not offer certain services such as shoeing drafts, but again I’d call those clients back and recommend someone.

Take care and good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,636 Posts
Just went through this myself and after having the same farrier family for years (dad from the time he started as an apprentice until he retired and then his son), I had a new farrier out today. He talks like he will be reliable, was a nice kid (keeping in my mind I'm old so anyone under 40 is a kid LOL), was good with the herd and looks like he did a good job but I'm reserving judgement on that until I see how they are all moving tomorrow.
 
21 - 28 of 28 Posts
Top