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I've been looking into buying a horse for a while, I've been riding on and off for 6 years but now I'm here to stay. I've been looking into nutrition and I'm currently at a border barn. I know never to go to an auction but that's as far as my knowledge goes, I've asked a few friends and they've said that they bought their horse from a friend. I've leased and am currently leasing, I'm looking to buy around the end of the year because I am showing the horse I'm leasing this year. I'm aware of all the expenses and I have basic knowledge about how to take care of worms, cuts, and just horse care in general. I've been looking online and I would like to ask my trainer at the end of the year since this is her horse I'm leasing. I would appreciate any advice on how to care/buy a horse and anything of the sort.
 

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Generally buying a local horse is better than having to pay someone to ship cross country, sight unseen. Do ask your trainer to help you look for the right horse and take her along to evaluate any prospects. When I got my last horse I had 4 more experienced horse people ride him and look him over before I bought. It really helps to have more eyes to help see things you might miss. And don't forget a vet check on any horse you are seriously considering.
 

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A trusted trainer/instructor to help you find and buy a horse suitable to your personality and ability of riding is worth the few dollars you will spend for their learned eye, contacts in the industry and insight of quality or not and compatible or not.
A vet who is going to do a exam, called a PPE{pre-purchase exam} to make sure at that time the horse is sound, healthy or you know if there are issues so you are prepared to deal with them...
A PPE can be very involved or just a wellness exam depending upon what level of riding you do and where you want to purchase a horse capable of doing...

Buying a horse who you can physically sit and ride, see in person to touch and handle is far better inmy opinion than buying a pretty picture and blurb written about it.
Unless you are a near expert in horseflesh, stay away from the auctions, especially for a first horse.
There are nice, lovely animals that go through them, but there are also those with issues you not want to get involved with.
Auction horses...just don't, not for this one.

Speak with your trainer now.
Give her a heads-up you are seriously considering purchasing by "???" and ask her if she would help you to find a horse in your price range.
You mentioned leasing her horse and would like to own it...just remember leasing does not tell you all the health concerns of the animal and for that reason to be a informed purchaser, that PPE is a good idea.
You just want to know what you face for a future in care if a vat can tell you, their guesstimate...
Since you don't own, you don't know what is being done to keep the animal sound/healthy for riders.

If your trainer is not available, then ask some trusted horsemen who know horses, are good custodians of care of their horses to give you some assistance.
By all means, read ads, the local for-sales...but right now not buy alone when you are more apt to be sold something you don't want/need than a steady partner for your abilities not riddled with complications.
Good luck and enjoy the journey toward ownership.
:runninghorse2:...
jmo...
 

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If you are thorough, it could take you a while to find the right horse for you. If you want a horse at the end of the year, you could start looking around November or even October. I don't know how nice of a horse you are looking to buy, or whether what I'm about to say applies to higher-end horses, but if you buy a lower-priced or mid-level horse in fall or early winter, you might get a better deal, as people are often looking to offload horses before they have to start buying a lot of hay for them. You might have more bargaining power. Ask if the seller will throw in the horse's tack for free, for instance.
 

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Besides the good advice above, I really recommend READING BOOKS. Your local library is full of information for free. The internet, with its itty bitty capsules of catchy prose and lots of pictures, is no substitute at all. Neither are random strangers about whom you have no clue about their experience (that would be us).
 
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