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crab creek ----CC

O-Carrol -----OC (oh see)

interesting reading

O'Carroll (Irish: Ó Cearbhaill), also known as simply Carroll or Carrell, is a Gaelic Irish clan which is the most prominent sept of the Ciannachta (also known as Clan Cian).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/O'Carroll
 

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Because over across the pond they also call them Drum Horses.
Drum horses of the Household Cavalry have to be over 16.2 and they like them to be skewbald. The right type are hard to find and I have seen Clydesdales with a lot of white belly markings used. Most are either Shire or Clyde crosses.

Drum horses are controlled by the reins being attached to the rider's stirrups.
 

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@Foxhunter, you made me do some research as I really didn't know that much other than hearing people call them that and have seen some pictures. This is what I found.

Standard | The International Drum Horse Association
Most people in the UK would just refer to that type as a Cob, as they are so common. You almost never hear the term "Vanner" let alone Drum horse, but is someone was being more descriptive they might say a Gypsy Cob.

Lovely colour, I would call him Ozzy.
 

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His color reminds me of a Buckskin, just very very light....so Bucky for a name. Or.....Gypsies (people) in some parts of the world call themselves 'Travelers', so maybe call him Traveler.

I once visited a prominent Gypsy Horse breeding farm in Tennessee and they explained that the smallest version is the Vanner (used to pull the Vans)(Although all sizes are used, so that was confusing to me) , the middle size are Cobs, and the largest ones are the Drum Horses, ie Gypsy Drum Horse. Maybe it's different in different areas. They didn't specify exact standards for each as in hands, just a general statement.

He's gorgeous!!
Has his mustache been shaved off ?
 

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His color reminds me of a Buckskin, just very very light....so Bucky for a name. Or.....Gypsies (people) in some parts of the world call themselves 'Travelers', so maybe call him Traveler.

I once visited a prominent Gypsy Horse breeding farm in Tennessee and they explained that the smallest version is the Vanner (used to pull the Vans)(Although all sizes are used, so that was confusing to me) , the middle size are Cobs, and the largest ones are the Drum Horses, ie Gypsy Drum Horse. Maybe it's different in different areas. They didn't specify exact standards for each as in hands, just a general statement.

He's gorgeous!!
Has his mustache been shaved off ?
I like the name Traveler! In the UK, you can have anthing from a 13hh cob (sometimes jokingly called a coblet) or a16hh+ cob, I guess we can be pretty basic in our generalising.
 

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Traveler was the name of General Robert E. Lee's gray horse he rode through out the Civil War.

The iron gray horse was born in 1857 in Greenbrier County, which is now in West Virginia. He was first called Jeff Davis by Andrew Johnston, who raised him.

He was a grey American Saddlebred of 16 hands (64 inches, 163 cm), notable for speed, strength and courage in combat. Lee acquired him in February 1862, and rode him in many battles. Traveller outlived Lee by only a few months, and had to be shot when he contracted untreatable tetanus.
 
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