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I think I have a bay dun Exmoor pony...am I right?

6731 Views 21 Replies 17 Participants Last post by  verona1016
Hi, completely new to the forum, was just hoping I could get some help with the colour of my Exmoor pony. We're pretty sure the little fella is a pure breed, but he's just not like the other kids! :) He has all the traditional Exmoor features - mealy muzzle, fleshy eyes with outlining, but Toby is also a honey colour with dark feet rather than the usual dark bay, and he has a dorsal stripe in all seasons, zebra stripes on the backs of his legs above the knee joint, and light, body-coloured 'frosting' on a dark mane and tail. I think he might be bay dun but, since the Exmoor is a primitive native breed anyway, it's been difficult to separate his Exmoor traits from dun ones! Can anybody else take a look at him and give an opinion? Thanks, I'd be grateful for any input.

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Looks dun to me, and I have read that dun is acceptable within the breed, so he is probably pure too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Is it really common for them to have this colouring then? Never had an Exmoor before and this is what I'm used to as 'typical' Exmoor colouring (see below). I know they sometimes have markings anyway, so here is where my confusion lies...are his markings to do with the dun, or just that he's an Exmoor?
 

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Is it really common for them to have this colouring then? Never had an Exmoor before and this is what I'm used to as 'typical' Exmoor colouring (see below). I know they sometimes have markings anyway, so here is where my confusion lies...are his markings to do with the dun, or just that he's an Exmoor?
From what I just looked up on them, many of them have pangare, which gives them the mealy appearance. Dorsal stripe, zebra striping, etc are all markings associated with the dun gene. If Exmoor ponies are a more primitive breed like you mentioned, then dun is most likely common within the breed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thank you so much for your help guys! It would make sense for dun to be common in a primitive breed I guess, I've just never seen another Exmoor this colour. If anyone else has one or knows of any, I'd love to see pictures.
 

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English Rose although your pony looks dun I can tell you he is absolutely 100% NOT an Exmoor . Firstly the colour dun is NEVER found in Exmoors, what is called dun in all the books is in fact buckskin ( the same cream gene that causes palomino in a chestnut). Secondly your pony definitely does NOT have a mealy muzzle or toad eye (called pangare ) He may be an Exmoor cross but he isn't pure bred. It's possible he may be part New Forest or Dartmoor Hill Pony but from the shape of him I'd put my money on a cross-bred Highland or Fjord.
 

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He's a cutie--are you sure about the "Dun?" Unless the breed has this color with black points, I'm leaning towards buckskin. My 5 yo QH is a Red Dunn. He has that funny back stripe with some on the shoulders--like a donkey, and I still shake my head at the zebra striping on his forearms! (pretty, but WEIRD!!)
 

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This horse is dun. Being so primitive, I am not surprised about Exmoors having dun gene. If it was cream, we would hear of double dilute Exmoors, which I have never heard of.
 
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