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I am a 13 yr old girl who's been wanting a horse since I was 5. I have been riding horses since I was very young.
Now, I want one even more. There is a mare about 11 hours away from me, an Icelandic. She's $4,000, so she's not exactly cheap, but a good price for an Icelandic.
My local barn is 15/20 minutes away, field board is $360 per month. This includes grain, holding for the farrier, holding for the vet, blanketing, stall cleaning, hay and water, minor vet care.
I'm find with half leasing to the riding school, it depends on the animal your half leasing but it's usually around $410.
Im not sure if tack is included with the purchase of the mare. :faceshot:
Also, I wouldn't be doing lots of showing so I could probably lease a trailer, or have my aunt bring hers to help pick up the mare.
If I did want to go to occasional shows it would be with my aunt, and she has a trailer for 2 horses.
By the way, I only have about $300/$400, do I would have to find a way to pay my parent's back.

If you have any advice, please tell me.
 

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I do not want to kill your dreams but being a straight talker I would tell you tomforget it!

Seeing pictures and a video of a horse is definitely NOT the same as in the flesh. You need to go try the animal, then have it vettedmand try umpteen other horses before you consider buying anything.

That is theneasy part, the not so easy is persuading your parents to buy you a horse. Do you have siblings? If so then surely they should also have the same amount of money spent on them? That is only fair.

Unless it states 'including tack' then it is doubtful anything except a halter will come with the animal. More expense.

Half leasing is all very well but how would you feel about turning up to ride and your horse is needed for a lesson? This could easily happen at weekends and in the holidays.

No doubt you would expect your parents to take you more frequently to the barn and either wait for you or, return later. More expense.

I was much the same as you in being horse crazy. I could walk/cycle to the stables, (neither of my parents ever drove) but I had to wait until I was actually working at the stables, had the chance to buy a horse I had just broken and could keep it for free.

You are expecting a lot, parents to pay out, Aunt to drive there and back to pick the horse up, all are significant costs. What little you have saved would not cover the haulage with wear and tear on the vehicle and trailer. Just to add, an eleven hour drive in a car is way faster than hauling a trailer and horse.
 
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Thank you Foxhunter. It's more important to hear that from someone other than my parents, seeing as they were never with me on this anyway. I don't think it'll be that easy to forget about the mare, though.
 

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I'm just going to start this out with saying that I'm only a couple years older than you, so my advice probably isn't the mature adult advice you're looking for but I'm going to give it a go with my thoughts. Taking that into consideration you might want to take it with a grain of salt.

Not knowing your skill level, I'm going to go off where I was at thirteen, and where one of show friends are at thirteen to kinda shape the advice I give.

Before going into consideration of purchase price, why the icelandic mare? Is it a thing of that being your favorite breed and wanting the horse you've always imagined? I'm not bashing the breed, I'd ask the same question if you were looking into an OTTB or AQHA.

Do your skill levels match up? I probably don't need to add upon this but the rhyme 'green and green equals black and blue' comes to mind. A little skill difference might be good, but too much and you both might be frustrated.

Do the goals you have suit the horse you're looking at? As if you want to do hunter jumpers or barrel racing she wouldn't be the horse for it above schooling shows. However if you are focusing on endurance or trail riding then it's another story.

Also with it being a smaller horse breed will you outgrow her soon? I'm not trying to say that she's a bad idea, I'm just trying to make sure that she'd be a fit for you and isn't just something you want due to her price.

We've all at least thought about getting a horse that isn't a good idea at some point, I'm not saying that she is a bad idea, but I'm speaking in terms of even though something is good deal it may not be right for you. I mean I almost went 13 hours last summer to buy an older gelding who needed corrective shoeing to stay sound as he was in my price range and could compete on the level I was trying to move up into. Looking back that would have been a stupid decision on my part. As a couple months later a horse came along in my budget and with the training needed to compete on a higher level. I could go on about my stupid decision however I think the one gets the point across.

I've bought more than a dozen horses over the years, some rescue type cases, some prospects, some show horses that have been put on the back burner, and I've had two come with more than a halter and lead rope. Some actually didn't even come with that. But for the two that did, one came with her bridle, another came with his bridle, turnout blanket, halter, splint boots, and bell boots. I've never had one come with their full set of tack and when shopping or browsing the only ones that do normally cost extra to buy the tack too.

Upon boarding you're also looking at other costs, some that aren't so easy to predict. For example you're looking at dropping $30-$75+ dollars every six to eight weeks depending on your farrier needs. You need a coggins test pulled yearly along with vaccines given. Upon that one bout of colic and you could be looking at thousands of dollars worth of vet bills. Horses dont exactly give you a phone call telling that they'll be colicing on the last Sunday of the month at 2pm, vet bills aren't routine.

I'm not even going to get into show fees, and the cost of tack and attire as it's a sky is the limit conversation and one that makes me realize how much money I'd have without horses.

In no way I'm I trying to be rude, but $300/$400 isn't a lot of money in general, but especially when dealing with horses. You'd be able to buy an okay set of tack with it and that's about it. Or maybe pay for the trip to the horse, and that all depends on the rig.

Would it be possible to do lessons and perhaps lease a local horse? I'm not sure about your area but I've seen a ton of onsite leases in my area around the $200 range or even free leases if you're paying for the horses care offsite. Theres still a lot of money going into this however not as much as owning, plus if you outgrow the horse, you can end your lease and not have to go through the process of selling.

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I am not clear how you would be paying for this horse? Not just the purchase price, but the board, vet, farrier, etc. Would it be your parents who are paying? If so, you need to talk to them to find out if they are willing. If they aren't, then you might as well stop thinking about it. It's extremely unlikely that you yourself would be able to pay all of these costs.

I can't speak for anyone else, but my barn supposedly had a program where they would half lease my horses, and it never worked out. I wouldn't count on that happening.
 
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For what it's worth, if I could add my 2 cents (I'm 68) all my life I've seen passion/desire for something is more profound than once obtained in most cases.
One example is people I know who have young daughters who wanted horses which they got, along with land, barn, paddock, tack, and all necessary clothes, equipment, fencing...list goes on. It was a dream come true...for a short while, then they lost interest.
When I met my wife 1/2 Century ago she had a horse, my Dad had a couple. Wife's dream was one day to again have a horse which we now have along with new stable, pastures, equipment, etc. but the excitement/passion isn't like it was years ago.
I certainly don't mean to discourage you but maybe walk before you run. Maybe friends your age that have horses close by you could ride with?
In a few years you'll want a car. Most people's first car is inexpensive. Certainly you may see and like a $50,000 one, but you have to take things in reasonable steps realizing all of the expenses involved and how you'll pay while at the same time the pride that comes with working and paying for things on your own.

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@Fuddyduddy1952 I remember my riding instructor gave me this speech about how you have to feed the horses in the cold and the heat, on holidays, and when your sick. She said you can't go on vacations without planning etc. I was mad at her. I thought she was being a jerk. She also talked about how you have to be able to cover vet bills and farrier, barn and maintenance, tack etc. I still thought she was being a jerk. She just wanted my money for lessons and her lesson horses...

I bought my horse. Then realized I still needed lessons. Owning a horse does not make an expert! And everything you think you know, well... you don't know nothing!

She thought my fire would fizzle but it didn't. I still have my horses and love it but I have a lot of friends that either got completely out of it, stuck their parents with their rides, or kept the horses but don't do anything with them....

So I agree with you on the not rushing into ownership thing for a lot of reasons. A million reasons....
 
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