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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Okays.

So this summer's the summer. I'm going to buy a horse and keep him at my trainer's stable. She's going to help me learn to take care of him. I'm looking for a more beginner-ish horse, but with potential..

I'm not looking for for anybody's offers, I'm just trying to get an opinion.

With physical disability, my trainer says I should get something smaller. 14.1, 14.2-ish..which is the size of the horses I ride. I can almost get on without any stool now, which is a lot better than I was before. She also said then I can classify in hunter pony and have an advantage over the real pony ponies. She says in this economy I shouldn't buy anything over 1000, and she's the type of person that can find a good horse with good potential that's just in bad health. I'm just not sure where to look.

I know a lot of people don't use horse classifieds, around here anyways. I've been looking on craigslist, and she's warned me about people drugging horses. I'm going to attack with questions. Personally, I just don't know where to look. If auctions are a good thing, if I should work through friends, or if I can find a sale barn that's offering a good horse. I'm fine spending a little extra money for a good horse, but I really don't want to go over 5000, although I'm thinking I do want to get a more beginner-ish horse and then move up if it's necessary for my skill level.

So, just for anyone who has opinions. If anyone /wants/ to offer me a sale, I'm only doing things locally, because I want to ride and get to know the horse, and vet check and etc. (Locally being Clear Lake, TX, area).

Anyways, for now I'm just working up my money and helping my trainer with her horses (and of course with my lessons). My plan is for when I get this horse to break him in a bit and get him used to the stable, which will just provide me even more time to get better. But idk, she's the expert, and I'm just following on what people are saying and what books say,.

Does anone have any suggestion, especially on where to look? I'm still unsure about breeds, though I do have preferences (although these include warmbloods--which are too tall and too hot for my trainer's liking for me), although I do see myself getting an everyday horse now and then when/if I get better I can get my dream horse. I'm one of those believers that if I have faith everything will work out, I just don't know what sort of sources to go to.
 

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Also try dreamhorse.com and equine.com. I agree about Craigslist......I don't think I would trust anything listed there. Another great resource is feed stores, equine vets, and farriers. They often know who has horses for sale and have a good idea which people and stables would be honest and reputable to buy from.
 

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To offer an opinion about buying at an auction or a horse in poor health, you might get a great deal on the horse but end up spending so much in getting the horse back to health that it's not worth it in the long run. Most horses in poor health need shots, teeth floating, lots of farrier visits to get their feet in good shape, etc. Sometimes, once the horse gets back to eating and some weight on them, they are full of energy and end up being too much horse for a novice or intermediate rider. I would definitely suggest getting a horse that you can be confident riding and is sound and in good health from the start.
 

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I like Dreamhorse. Horsetopia.com is another. Have your trainer and all your horsey friends contact there horsey friends and put the word out. Many people have horses they love but may have out grown and would sell if they found the right home but not necessarily actively try and sell on a website.
 

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I think you are going about this in the right way. I wouldn't discount Craigslist but I certainly would be careful, as I would with any horse I went to see.

What I recommend is to show up an hour early and expect to see the horse in it's stall or in the pasture - not tacked up or preworked. I want to see the horse caught, groomed, and tacked. Since you are new to horses, relatively at least to purchasing one, always bring a very knowledgeable horseman with you - not a "friend who is a good rider and 'knows' about horses".

Remember the cheapest part of owning a horse is the purchase price. Care, training, feed, vet bills, farrier, etc will far out distance the initial purchase price. Also remember that is costs just as much to take care of a bad horse as it does a good one - probably more.

Use your head and not your heart - don't buy a horse just to take it away from it's "horrible" conditions or the people who own him. If the horse is in such bad conditions, call Animal Control. One last thing, don't be afraid to admit that you made a mistake if you bought a horse that doesn't fit your purpose. Rehome the horse and find another. Too many buyers spend money that shouldn't be spent trying to make a bad fit work.

Good luck!
 

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I never let my clients see potential horses till I get it narrowed down to a handful, mainly because once they decide they want a horse, they fall in love with each and every one they look at, lol. Before you even start to search, write out a list of EXACTY what you want, even down to the littlest nit-picky detail, then limit yourself to those criteria. If you don't find something right away, DON'T branch outside of those limits until you've given it some time. It may take a while to find just the right one, but you'll end up with what you wanted in the first place, not just the first "kinda-sorta suitable" horse to come along.
 

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And above all, MAKE SURE YOU'RE COMFORTABLE WITH THE HORSE YOU GET. I see so many people buy horses that have too big of a trot for them to handle, or seem too out-of-control at the canter, or whatever the uneasiness is derived from. Only buy a horse you feel comfortable with--you'll thank yourself later.
 

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What I recommend is to show up an hour early and expect to see the horse in it's stall or in the pasture - not tacked up or preworked.
I disagree with this - If I am showing a horse I only arrive ten or so minutes before the arranged time. My horse is on private property and the person who owns the property would be very unimpressed by a stranger wandering around on his property unnanounced and unacompanied.

Trust needs to go both ways - I don't know if I would be comfortable selling my horse to someone who was actively trying to 'catch me out' - I do my best when selling a horse to be honest and accomodatiing and it would be offensive that the buyer wasn't the same.
 

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I found my new horse on Craigslist. But my trainer did comment it was odd they posted exclusively on there. But it turned out she was just inexperienced in trying to find a new home for a horse, and she had had him for the last 7 years.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Thanks for all of the advice.

I have lots of bookexperience and know a lot of what's in the books, but ultimately I'm going to go with my common sense and trust my trainer (who will always be going with me). Almost everything I completely agree with, and I would NEVER go to a horse that's already caught and tacked up. I don't want to have a horse I'm not comfortable with, especially with a disability.

As for Brazoria county, I think it is fairly close. I live about thirty minutes away from Galveston. I am not expecting to find a horse ridiculously close to where I live, especially since my community is more boaty than horsey.

I'm learning every day a little more. I want a horse that I can train. I know basic principles of training, but I in no way want a horse that's green, just a horse that maybe with some help I can fine tune to what I want.

Since I'm getting closer and closer to this, I was wondering if somebody could help me make some sort of list as to things that will be needed and the pricing for it. I'm boarding at my trainer's, and she's giving me 1/2 off if I let her use my horse as a lesson horse. I'm also planning on buying her saddle, but I am not sure for certain yet if this will fit the horse I buy, namely because I don't know what horse I'm buying! So tack, cleaners, any equipment and fees, I'm still a bit green to this and I want to be 80% prepared before I step into this.
 

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Guys, unfortunately many many sellers are not like you. I've bought and sold quite a few horses over the past 30 years and I've seen too many that were worked hard before I showed up so that you didn't know what you were getting into. Same as a horse that was ready to go - no one could see the difficulty there was in getting that horse saddled or groomed.

I've also seen cases were the horse was drugged just before a buyer got there. Not all sellers are as honest as you folks so I try to be as careful as I can. Frankly, I don't usually put a lot of trust in a person selling a horse because of all the things I've seen sellers do.

Showing up early may be rude to you but I've turned down a lot of horses because of what I saw when I got there early.
 

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You really do want to be cautious doing the whole "half off board if she can use my horse for lessons" thing. You may find out quickly that she plans to use your horse more than you think, or on days you planned to ride. Also, you will have any number of different people riding your horse, which may not be such a good idea. They can pick up all sorts of bad training by being lesson horses with random inexperienced riders. You may spend all your time "fixing" what everyone else has done. If you go that route, may sure you have an agreement in writing just how much she can use your horse and for what kinds of riders.
 
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