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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So remember when I butchered my horses mane? Well the groomer I had out to fix it was a professional body clipper as well. She told me that I should consider getting both of my horses body clipped because with the how hot it is here it can cause them respiratory issues, etc.

She said since I'm going to take them to some A-rated shows soon (fingers crossed) she recommends I get then full show clips which she normally does for $200 each but for us she would do $120, since I'm going to be working for her over the summer. She said that all the horses that compete at the show venue I'm going to get body clipped and she said we should try and schedule asap.

My question, is this just her way of trying to persuade me to spend money, or is it actually something I should be worried about? She scared my mom into it and my mom is now scheduling it for 2 weeks.
Also if this is something I end up doing, how do I prepare the horses for it and what extra maintenance will be required once they're clipped?
 

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My opinion....she is looking to make money off of you.
Your horses are thin skinned Thoroughbreds who shed out to glossy beautiful coats.
Your horses living here in Florida need the protection of their summer coats length to keep them from sunburning...
Yes, your horses can, will and could sunburn if the protection of their coat is taken away...
Unless you have wooly bears you don't need to be clipping them. {If your horses still have winter coats you need to call a vet cause they are sick!}
If you clip you will also lose the protection they have now to reduce the fly irritation they both will then encounter.
Add to that that their coat, short summer length as it is, also can be lofted {raised} so they can catch the tiniest breeze or air movement which helps them to cool themselves under our brutal sun exposure and heat.
To be honest, you are quite a ways away from being a team to ride the "A" circuit.
You need to learn the finer points of riding in your local events where proper turnout of horse and rider is needed...
However, with where you live and the huge step-up in competition level of horse and rider concerning appearances you will find at "A" shows...
Not all "snow-birds" go north this time of year...
In your area the elite of the riding and equestrian world inhabit and that takes you up several notches in everything needing to be just so...
"A" shows are the cream of the crop in horses and riders with near perfection very often presented in the show-ring.
Even on "local day" you will be competing against the best of the best in horses professionally schooled/trained and riders who have the very best in instruction 2 - 3 lessons per week...
Be very careful you not over-face yourself and your horses to much to soon or it could be disastrous in your progress...
Besides the entry fees are double what you pay per class so it will limit you to what you do.
Class sizes are often 25 - 30 or more riders...you sure you're ready for that?:|
Just because a "groomer" says does not make it so...
Live and be realistic in you and your horses abilities so you continue to grow and improve together, not become defeated and sour to horsemanship gains and goals.
jmo...
:runninghorse2:...
 

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You don't need to do it, but most of the A show horse will be fully body clipped from my experience.
Yes it sounds like they are looking for a client to make some money. There is no health need for it here. It's all fashion.
I haven't heard of respiratory issues caused by not clipping, that sounds false to me.
You will want to give your horse a bath and let dry before they are clipped.
If it gets cold you may opt to use a sheet at night, but it was never an issue here where it stays 50+ at night.
Some healthy horses will have such a nice summer coat it will shine more than a clipped one, so take that into consideration. This year I won't clip my horse, even for showing, because his coat is already short and super shiny, just as an example.
You should post a pic of the new mane!
 

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Well, the show world is very competitive. If your horse is still hanging on to their winter coat than yes you should clip. You want to be able to compete at that level. A well groomed horse is the norm, where a coated horse maybe over looked even if you perform well. It's all part of that world. As for after care what color is your horse? You may need to invest in a UV fly sheet to protect their skin if they're turned out at all. Fly spray but be careful because now it can get on their skin. Use a good conditioning shampoo on their skin the first few baths to moisturize and remove all the dander, and it doesn't have to be expensive just a good one. Most of all have fun enjoy the experience.
 

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LOL, I had to chuckle at the 'respiratory issues' part. She sounds like she's trying to make money. I get it, she has to make her money somehow, but that's a bunch of bologna.
You don't HAVE to clip. Most people do for shows, but it's not totally necessary. As long as he is cleaned up & doesn't have a raggedy coat, I don't seen an issue. But the again, I don't show anymore.
 

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Lol, if you want to pay $240 for something that isn't needed, go ahead. Your horses aren't going to get respiratory issues from not being clipped. That's a bunch of lies.



I wouldn't bother with it in Florida until you are competitive at the top of the A-rated level. For now, concentrate on your riding, tack fit, make sure you and your horse and neat and clean and properly trained, and worry about the rest later. Clip the bridle path, make sure your horse's mane is pulled and neat, and clip around the coronets and pasterns. For showing, you'll probably also need to clip the ears and face, which means your horses will need fly masks and fly protection for their ears if turned out. If they're out during the day, clipping is actually bad for them as it removes even the minimal coat they will get in the summer, and makes it more likely they will sunburn-- a clipped horse can't be out in the sun/insects without a fly/sun sheet and protection.


I think there are a lot more things you could spend that $240 on that will do a lot more good.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thats what I was thinking... Every horse I know doesn't get clipped, except a chunky Halflinger with hair 3 inches long.

My mother is still pressuring me to do it. She even scheduled in an appointment for the 19th.

I do love the aesthetic of clipped horses.... but I also love having money. I could get a new saddle instead.... I guess I'll have to see what happens.
 

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I do love the aesthetic of clipped horses....
Is mom then going to buy you UVA/UVB fly sheets to protect the horses from sunburn and the impossible flies they will be plagued with here in the state?

Also remember "aesthetics aside"...
Your horses summer coat is in...
Clip now and they will look dull coated for probably 3+ weeks easily since they have already shed out, maybe longer.
It will grow out but it could take as much as 6 weeks or more for any protection factor to naturally return as old hair sheds and new replaces...same as us with our hair or our dogs who either shed or get groomed...
Your horses shed...
Your gorgeous coated chestnut is going to get mousy looking and not be so stunning...be prepared.
I too like a nice clip job done when appropriate, right now though is not appropriate or needed...
They already did the shed out in your part of Florida..

Good luck convincing mom...

:runninghorse2:...
jmo...
 

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No, you don't need to clip just because it's getting warm. They'll be fully shed out in a month, it's a massive waste.

We don't clip in springtime in Australia (unless it's a show pony which are shown clipped year-round). We clip in June at the LATEST. And we have days over 100F as early as late September sometimes.

My horse needs to be clipped soon but it's coming up to winter here and she sweats heavily when worked. It takes her hours to dry when she's in full coat. I don't have hours, so she gets clipped for her own good.
 

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We only shave the cushing horses and not that short. The rest need the protection from the sun and the flies.
She is looking at the money, never heard of hairy horses having respiratory issues.
 

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That would be pure baloney. She's just after the money. Friends that attended Rolex this year sent back plenty of pics. None were clipped. Several train further south in Florida than you are. Unless your horse is a wooly bear, and from pics neither is, then dont clip. They'll fry.
 

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You have to separate a horse getting too hot and a horse getting actual heatstroke from overheating.
Horses can suffer respiratory breakdown if they get heatstroke - along with other associated serious and potential life threatening body function breakdowns,


I don't think that you're going to be working your horses hard enough to risk heat stroke though I see nothing wrong in clipping a working horse in a hot humid climate as long as you can provide the essential protections its going to need.
Clipping competition horses in the summer is commonplace and not restricted to horses at top level. It makes cooling them down and drying them off a lot easier but you do need to weigh up the pros and cons for your own horses and situation


I would suggest that for now you learn how to recognise the early symptoms of over heating and what to do if you suspect your horse is reaching the worrying point of it.
 

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I lived in Florida and clipped all of our horses all year round. $120 is a reasonable price for a full grown horse. I see nothing wrong with clipping horses in the summer, but re-read Jaydee’s Advice about learning to recognize early signs of over heating.
 
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